NC - Greenville: Greenville City Council Meeting

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Greenville City Council Meeting

City Council Chambers 200 West Fifth Street

Assistive listening devices are available upon request for meetings held in the Council Chambers. If an interpreter is needed for deaf or hearing impaired citizens, please call 252-329-4422 (voice) or 252-329-4060 (TDD) no later than two business days prior to the meeting.

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I.
Call Meeting To Order

No additional detail provided

II.
Invocation - Council Member Meyerhoeffer

No additional detail provided

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III.
Pledge of Allegiance

No additional detail provided

IV.
Roll Call

V. Approval of Agenda l Public Comment Period The Public Comment Period is a period reserved for comments by the public. Items that were or are scheduled to be the subject of public hearings conducted at the same meeting or another meeting during the same week shall not be discussed. A total of 30 minutes is allocated with each individual being allowed no more than 3 minutes. Individuals who registered with the City Clerk to speak will speak in the order registered until the allocated 30 minutes expires. If time remains after all persons who registered have spoken, individuals who did not register will have an opportunity to speak until the allocated 30 minutes expires.

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VI.
Consent Agenda

1. Minutes from the November 13 and December 11, 2017 and January 8 and January 11, 2018 City Council meetings
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2.
Resolution accepting dedication of rights-of-way and easements for Langston West Sections 8 and 9

3. Request by Wells Fargo Bank to donate property located at 507 Roosevelt Avenue to the City of Greenville
Tagged Passions:property and easement

4.
Resolution declaring certain Police equipment as surplus and authorizing its disposition to the Ayden Police Department

5. Approval of the purchase of a new 911 Telephone System in the Police Department's Communications Center and back-up equipment for the Emergency Operations Center 6. Approval of the purchase of 35 vehicles for the Police Department 7. Approval of the purchase and installation of equipment and lights for Police Department Vehicles 8. Approval of the purchase of five vehicles for the Public Works Department Sanitation Division 9. Approval of the purchase of a Backhoe for the Recreation and Parks Department

Tagged Passions:public safety, purchasing, Public Works, Communications, Tony Taylor Custom, surplus, equipment, communications, emergency, parks, 911, recreation, solid waste, and public works

10.
Report on Bids and Contracts Awarded

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:rfp, RFP, and contract

11.
Various tax refunds greater than 100

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

VII.
New Business

12. Presentations by Boards and Commissions:

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a.
Board of Adjustment

No additional detail provided

b.
Community Appearance Commission

No additional detail provided

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c.
Neighborhood Advisory Board

No additional detail provided

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13.
City of Greenville's participation in economic development feasibility study and strategic plan development

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:development, strategic, Development, and economic development

14.
Amendment to the 2018 Schedule of City Council Meetings to add monthly workshop meetings

No additional detail provided

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VIII.
Review of February 8, 2018 City Council Agenda

No additional detail provided

IX.
City Manager's Report

X. Comments from Mayor and City Council

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, and council

XI.
Adjournment

No additional detail provided

City of Greenville, North Carolina

Title of Item: Minutes from the November 13 and December 11, 2017 and January 8 and January 11, 2018 City Council meetings

Explanation: Proposed minutes from City Council meetings held on November 13 and December 11, 2017 and January 8 and January 11, 2018 are presented for review and approval
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Fiscal Note: There is no direct cost to the City.

Recommendation: Review and approve proposed minutes from City Council meetings held on November 13 and December 11, 2017 and January 8 and January 11, 2018 Viewing Attachments Requires Adobe Acrobat. Click here to download. Attachments / click to download Proposed_Minutes_for_December_11_2017_City_Council_Meeting_Installation_of_Mayor_and_City_Council_1070592 Proposed_Minutes_of_the_January_11,_2018_City_Council_Meeting_1069667
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PROPOSED MINUTES MEETING OF THE CITY COUNCIL

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CITY OF GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2017

The Greenville City Council met in a regular meeting on the above date at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers, third floor of City Hall, with Mayor Kandie D. Smith presiding. The meeting was called to order, followed by the invocation by Mayor Pro-Tem Rose H. Glover and the Pledge of Allegiance. Those Present: Mayor Kandie D. Smith; Mayor Pro-Tem Rose H. Glover; Council Member Shawan M. Barr; Council Member Rick Smiley; Council Member P. J. Connelly; and Council Member Calvin R. Mercer Those Absent: Also Present:

Ann E. Wall, City Manager; Emanuel D. McGirt, City Attorney; Carol L. Barwick, City Clerk; and Polly W. Jones, Deputy City Clerk

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator, legal, and manager

APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA

Motion was made by Council Member Mercer and seconded by Mayor Pro-Tem Glover to approve the agenda. Motion carried unanimously.

PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD
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John Drew Ligon, District 3 Mr. Ligon spoke in opposition of the proposed management services contract for the Bradford Creek Public Golf Course (Bradford Creek). He asked that the matter be delayed for discussion and no action be taken until the City Council has received input from the residents of Greenville and the golfing community. Other Recreation and Parks Department projects have had an opportunity for public input such as the West Pointe Plaza Park and Sycamore Hill Baptist Memorial Plaza in Town Common. Bradford Creek is the only recreation and parks facility that has been excluded from the public input process by the City of Greenville.

Tagged Passions:services, contract, council, golf, parks, recreation, and facility

Mr. Ligon stated that he is confused by the City Council s vision for the future of the City of Greenville, when it relates to the City Council Members phrases about quality of life and economic development. If growth is a long-term goal of Greenville, the City Council must

Attachment number 1 Page 1 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 2 of 26 look at what the larger cities are doing, including Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Greensboro, Durham, Winston-Salem and High Point. All of these cities have municipal golf courses and only one of them that he knows of makes a profit. All of these cities feel that the golf course is an integral part of their total recreation and parks program, the quality of life of the residents, and economic development initiatives. These cities provide adequate budgetary funding between 15,000- 300,000 for operations and capital improvements, based on their long-term vision for their city.

Tagged Passions:budget, capital spending, Capital Spending, development, golf, strategic, funding, parks, Development, recreation, growth, program, and economic development

Mr. Ligon stated that he has not seen how Billy Casper plans to carry through its promises of increasing revenue substantially to meet the financial objectives of the contract. He is skeptical and would like to see the details of the magic wand that Billy Casper would use to make this happen.

John Joseph Laffiteau Rodeway Inn and Suites, Room 253, 301 Greenville Blvd. SE Mr. Laffiteau read what appears on his public comment form as follows: COPY John Joseph Laffiteau is a student at PCC currently enrolled in an Intermediate Accounting Course, a course in Personal Income Taxes, and a Sociology Course in social problems. A personnel matter arose at the East Branch of Sheppard Memorial Library. Camera evidence, testimony of other patrons, and past patterns of Mr. Laffiteau s conduct do not support the staff s allegations of a violation of the Patrons Code of Conduct by him. Therefore, to more precisely resolve these inherent conflicts, Mr. Laffiteau would like to voluntarily and mutually agree with the staff to take polygraph tests as an untapped source of evidence - again, all done on a voluntary truth-seeking endeavor. John Joseph Laffiteau END COPY

Tagged Passions:taxes, personnel, Taxes, contract, hotel, finance, and library

Dr. Yoshi Newman 214 Quail Hollow Road re recognition, lighting Dr. Newman commended and thanked Council Member Calvin Mercer for his 10 years of honorable and dedicated services to the citizens of Greenville. She admires the impeccable way that he conducted his campaign and the impeccable and honorable way in which he engaged in that process.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, recognition, services, and council

Dr. Newman made comments about the City s update on street lighting, stating she would like to hear the specifics of the type of lighting that is going to be used. An accomplished local astrophotographer, Tim Christensen, said in an interview with The Daily Reflector that he cannot point his camera toward Greenville because improper lighting has obscured the night sky. He commented that this is particularly sad for children growing up in the City where they will never see a clear night sky. She feels that it is important to consider the environmental implications of the City s lighting choices. She would like to see focused

Attachment number 1 Page 2 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 3 of 26

Tagged Passions:streets, traffic, environment, and streetscape

caps and sheltered light for the neighborhoods and streets, and not LED lights. There is a number of advantages to this lighting 1) environmental issues and the impact that LED lighting has on humans and animals 2) the cost savings by using a much more energy- efficient source of lighting. More information about those and other issues related to proper lighting can be found at darksky.org.

Tagged Passions:streets, energy, neighborhood, and environment

Dr. Newman proposed that the citizens should have an interactive process with the City Council. In the City s current forum, citizens can express their concerns during a public comment period, but it is not an interactive forum for citizens. She feels that the City Council listens thoughtfully to the things that people say, but to have an interactive forum would be helpful and beneficial.

Cheryl Waters No Address Given Ms. Waters commended Council Member Barr for her services to the City of Greenville, stating that the citizens are proud of the efforts made by Council Member Barr. She allowed the citizens of District 1 to express their views and concerns and responded as best as she could. They are pinpointing her exclusively, but the citizens are not saying that no one else has done a great job, because of the responsibility and task that Council Member Barr took on and she did a phenomenal job. Ms. Waters stated the citizens want to make sure that Council Member Barr s efforts are not undeserved and unacknowledged. SPECIAL RECOGNITIONS Mayor Smith commended Council Member Barr for her service to the City of Greenville since August 2017 and presented a plaque to Council Member Barr. Mayor Smith acknowledged Council Member Godley s service to the City of Greenville since 2015 and provided a plaque for his term of service. Mayor Smith commended Council Member At-Large Mercer s service (2007-2017) to the City of Greenville and presented him a plaque.

Tagged Passions:recognition, services, council, Utility, utility, and water

Minutes from the City Council Planning Session held on January 27-28, 2017

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Attachment number 1 Page 3 of 26

Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 4 of 26

Ordinance Amending the Fee for an Application for Distributed Antenna System (DAS) Equipment - (Ordinance No. 17-060)

Tagged Passions:ordinance, distributed antenna system, equipment, and Distributed antenna system

Resolution authorizing the purchase and sale of property for Greenville Utilities Commission s Hudson s Crossroads 115 kV Substation Site - (Resolution No. 058-17)

Agreement with Billy Casper Golf for Management and Operation of Bradford Creek Public Golf Course Contract Award for the Purchase of Four Transit Buses

Tagged Passions:property, purchasing, boards and commissions, contract, Utility, Public Transit, golf, sale, and utility

Report on Bids and Contracts Awarded

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Various tax refunds greater than 100

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Motion was made by Council Member Mercer and seconded by Council Member Barr to approve the items under the Consent Agenda. Motion carried unanimously.

NEW BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS BY BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS Human Relations Council Chairperson Joyce Mitchell gave a detailed report of the Human Relations Council s accomplishments, events, and activities for the past year. COPY HUMAN RELATIONS COUNCIL Annual Report Presented by Joyce Mitchell, Chairperson
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, council, events, and business

Ordinance No. 382 on February 10, 1972 established the Greenville Human Relations Council. It s Mission:

The Human Relations Council Mission is to serve as advocate for all people in pursuit of human and economic relationships, to promote activities, education and programs, which enhance human dignity, equal opportunity, mutual respect and harmony among the many different residents of Greenville. Attachment number 1 Page 4 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 5 of 26 The Council s Vision is for an inclusive community where trust, acceptance, fairness, and equity are community norms. The ROLE OF THE COUNCIL is to: Develop and strengthen ties among organizations working in the area of human rights.
Tagged Passions:education, ordinance, human rights, strategic, and program

Study any conditions that present prejudice or discrimination against protected classes.

Work to prevent discrimination by developing educational materials and programs to promote equal rights, understanding, inclusiveness, and acceptance. Continue to partner and consult with state, federal, and other governmental authorities on any matters, disputes, and controversies within the City s jurisdiction regarding fair housing complaints. Make recommendations to City Council on procedures, programs, or policies that promote diversity, acceptance, equal right, understanding, and inclusion.

Tagged Passions:council, discrimination, diversity, civil rights, materials, housing, procedure, and program

Provide information and referral resources on human rights issues to members of the community.

Foster open communication about human rights issues in Greenville. The Council is responsible for a number of projects and activities aligned with its mission. In order to accomplish our work, the Council depends on:

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1.
Internal Work Group: A group primarily comprised of Human Relations Council members and city staff, which collaborate on coordinating projects.

No additional detail provided

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2.
External Work Group: A group comprised of both Council members and members of community groups/agencies who share information and collaborate on projects related to shared goals and objectives.

No additional detail provided

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3.
Coordinator: The Human Relations Council staff liaison oversees and coordinates

activities and all events. The staff liaison works with the Council and members of the community to accomplish the Council goals. INITIATIVES The Human Relations Council annual events and activities include: 1. Fair Housing Initiative: The Council believes a vital step in building better neighborhoods, is to eliminate housing discrimination, allowing all residents equal opportunities. April is National Fair Housing Month. The Council and City partners sponsored to Fair Housing seminars this year: Fair Housing Laws and Practices Tuesday, April 11th Attachment number 1 Page 5 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 6 of 26 Fair Housing Accessibility: Design and Construction Tuesday, April 18th

Tagged Passions:discrimination, housing, neighborhood, events, and construction

2.
The City s Inclusive Community Breakfast is held annually on the fourth Thursday in September. September 2017 theme Cops and Barbers provided an opportunity for the community to learn more about the program.

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3.
Human Relations Month is observed annually in February. In celebration of outstanding achievement and diligent work in improving the equality and diverse environment o the City, the awards ceremony recognize and promote residents who are dedicated for their humanitarian and volunteerism efforts.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:recognition, equality, Conservation, and environment

4.
Senior Citizens Christmas Celebration is held annually on the first Thursday of

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December. The celebration will take place at the Drew Steele Center. Volunteers are: Greenville Police Department, Pitt County Sheriff s Office, City Council, County Commissioners, and city staff.

Tagged Passions:public safety, council, and volunteer

5.
Bringing People Together from all Walks of Life: Dismantling Racism. The Council and their partners sponsor community dialogues throughout the year. The purpose is to develop positive ways the community can work together to unify and embrace the city s culturally diverse community. The Council believes it is all about planting seeds of change that will transform us individually and collectively as a community and lead us to a path of acceptance, understanding, and peace. In 2017, four community dialogues were held: January, March, July, and October.

6. Assisted with the Sister City Initiative (South Korea) The Council reviewed information regarding the membership and attendance policy for boards and commission. The Human Relations Council is a diverse board with a membership of 18 representatives. We have one vacancy for a regular member and a vacancy for a Pitt Community College representative. Currently, the Council does not have an issue with having our monthly meetings or having to cancel due to lack of a quorum. The Council does not meet in July (vacation month). Council meetings are held the fourth Thursday of the month at 6:00 pm. In conclusion, we live in times of great opportunities and challenges and both require civic character and conduct that respects and honors the civil and human rights of all residents. The Council is entrusted with a noble charge of improving the relationships within our city by planting seeds of change, by cultivating an atmosphere of mutual appreciation, and by respecting our diverse community. We thank you for your time and especially for your continued support and leadership in all our efforts, including the allocation of funds to carry out our mission. END COPY Attachment number 1 Page 6 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 7 of 26

Tagged Passions:policy, boards and commissions, university, discrimination, human rights, plant, sister city, civil rights, and funding

Youth Council Chairperson Allison Chiancone gave a detailed report of the activities and accomplishments of the Youth Council for the past year.

COPY GREENVILLE YOUTH COUNCIL Annual Report Presented by Allison Chiancone The Greenville Youth Council was created on August 11, 2005 for high school students who are interested in providing a voice on city-wide issues. The Council is composed of twenty (20) members and currently have nine (12) members with additional members (approximately 3 or more) being appointed in December. The Council s Mission is to enrich the lives of the youth by encouraging involvement in the community and local government; and, the Vision is for empowered and engaged young people, working for a better community. The Council s purpose is to give youth an opportunity to become knowledgeable of local government, to develop leadership skills, to become involved in community service projects, and to make recommendations to City Council on issues that affect youth. At the Council s orientation meeting on Monday, September 25th, the Council discussed the attendance policy, the by-laws, dress code, recruiting of new members and the possibility of being chartered by the State Youth Council.

Tagged Passions:education, policy, appointments, council, Tony Taylor Custom, youth, strategic, and students

For more than a year, a goal for the Youth Council has been to organize, coordinate, and launch an annual community Youth Fest. Creating the Fest has been challenging, but the Council is determined for it to materialize. The initiative has progressed with the development of food vendor applications, information booth applications, and promotional materials.

Tagged Passions:council, development, youth, materials, and Development

It is the Youth Council s hope that the City Council will support this effort. A Youth Fest in Greenville will provide opportunities for young people to showcase their unique talent. The fest will include art, music, dance, the spoken word, games, and various vendors (food, art, etc.). Hopefully, by 2019, the City of Greenville would have supported and assisted the Youth Council in developing this platform.

The Youth Council continues to support and become involved in initiatives that increase our understanding of the importance of volunteering and being involved. We have attended the Focused Deterrence Violence Reduction Initiative; participated in community dialogues sponsored by the Human Relations Council; volunteered at Relay for Life and The Boys and Girls Club; and, partnered with the Greenville Police Department to provide an opportunity for young people to discuss How to Legally Demonstrate . Deputy Chief of Attachment number 1 Page 7 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 8 of 26 Police Ted Sauls presentation included: legal demonstrations; how not to incite a riot; and, using appropriate language. Recruiting New Members In the Council s 2016 Annual Report, it is stated that when the Council was first established, there was an incentive that encouraged students to get involved . Students were allowed to attend the National League of Cities Conference. This is not a request for that particular incentive; however, there is a need for incentives to keep the youth interested and to get more involved. At our September 2017 meeting, the possibility for us to be chartered under the State Youth Council was briefly discussed. If the Council was chartered under the State Youth Council, it would provide opportunities for Council members to attend youth leadership conferences across the state.
Tagged Passions:arts, legal, public safety, Tony Taylor Custom, youth, volunteer, students, and incentive

In conclusion, the Youth Council is a great opportunity for youth to get involved in both their community and local government. Past and current members want the Council to be successful. However, our Council needs your help in providing us with the right tools and resources to bring it to fruition.

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If there are no questions, the Youth Council appreciates your time and our opportunity to serve.

END COPY Historic Preservation Commission Chairperson Candace Pearce reported that the Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) submitted a 14-page document, Historic Preservation Commission Overview, to the City Council. Over the years, starting in 2008, the HPC has asked the City Council to consider the adoption of several resolutions or ordinances related to 1) preservation of Cherry Hill Cemetery, 2) enacting anti-demolition by neglect, 3) preservation of easement on the Imperial site, 4) historical markers funding, and 5) FIG (Fa ade Improvement Grant) boundaries for site improvement grant boundary extensions. The City Council has not had any discussions at its meetings about these requests from the members of the HPC, who are talented and spend a lot of time doing this kind of work hoping to make Greenville a historical and more significant place.

Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, ordinance, council, youth, demolition, historical, funding, historic, easement, grant, and preservation

Chairperson Pearce reported that the HPC is doing well with the FIGs, but is having problems in other areas of its responsibilities. The HPC has a problem with people standing in line to do good things to the buildings in the City. A whole new addition to the site improvement grant area is wanted which would extend down from the Imperial Tobacco Warehouse site and further into West Greenville. Not only could there be existing buildings, historical markers could be placed where buildings once were.

No additional detail provided

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Chairperson Pearce stated that the College View Historic District is in bad condition. It is the only overlay district in the City even though there are five historic districts. The number of stockade fences, which are higher than mostly eight feet, are supposed to be six

Attachment number 1 Page 8 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 9 of 26 on the back, five on the side and three in the front. They have tripled in the past 10 years and there are reasons for that. The whole neighborhood was designed as an open air (people knew what people were doing) neighborhood. The residents of this district requested to have the neighborhood brought into a zoning overlay because they wanted to maintain the character of that neighborhood.

Tagged Passions:university, historic, zoning, and neighborhood

Chairperson Pearce stated that the HPC is still approving and denying Certificates of Appropriateness. The HPC fee schedule was once 0, but now a Certificate of Appropriateness is 50 and 20 for a Minor Works Certificate of Appropriateness. She would be thrilled to have conversations with any of the City Council Members about some of the problems the HPC is facing.

FINANCIAL AUDIT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2017 - (Resolution No. 059-17)

Tagged Passions:audit, council, and finance

Director of Financial Services Bernita Demery introduced April Adams of Cherry Bekaert LLP, the City's independent auditor, and explained the results of the City of Greenville's 2016-2017 external audit. The City has received an unmodified opinion on compliance for all federal and state programs, which is the highest opinion that can be received on financial statements and a single audit. There was no management letter or findings on the City s financial statements for the second year. Four major programs were tested: 1) Clean Water State Revolving Fund Cluster, 2) Powell Bill Grant, 3) Community Development Block Grant, and 4) Federal Transit Cluster and State Match. Non-material and non- compliance were the two findings on the Federal Transit Cluster and State Match.

Tagged Passions:compliance, audit, services, Utility, development, financial report, finance, utility, Development, cdbg, program, grant, community development, and water

Director Demery reported that the City s fund balance available for the General Fund is 25,824,799 in 2017. The available amount in 2016 was 24,897,233, a decrease of 927,566. In both years, the City s available general fund balance percentage of expenditures is the same, which is 32 . The total revenues are 80,855,029 and expenses are 81,876,066 with a difference of ( 1,021,037). Expenses are within 3 of revenues. The City s total revenue increase is 4 because of the tax rate decrease from .53 to .52, the City s inspection fees increased substantially, and there was a 10 increase in sales tax.

Director Demery reported that property tax and sales tax make up 65 of the City s total revenue whereas last year, property tax made up 43 of the total revenue. For every dollar spent, 46 was spent on public safety, which includes police and fire/rescue. Director Demery summarized the General Fund information stating that revenues are up 4 (increased sales tax and motor vehicle collection), expenses are up 5 (General Fund Capital Improvement Program projects transferred to their respective Capital Project Funds), and the City remained within the 14 Unassigned Fund Balance Policy. The ending fund balance for 2016 was 32,442,111 and it was at 31,421,084 for 2017 with a decrease of ( 1,021,027). The total fund balance is 31,421,084 and the following table illustrates the -3 decrease. Attachment number 1 Page 9 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 10 of 26 Director Demery reported that in 2017, the City s available fund balance is at 29.17 compared to other municipalities 2016 numbers. Director Demery reported that one of the major shifts in the restricted fund balance was the City s decrease in accounts receivable at June 30, 2017, which is outstanding. The City s unassigned fund balance percentage is still within 14 . Attachment number 1 Page 10 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 11 of 26

Tagged Passions:taxes, property, Taxes, capital spending, public safety, policy, Capital Spending, funding, sale, program, and property tax

Director Demery reported that the following are budget amendments that have been before the City Council as appropriations and commitments. The calculated unassigned fund balance is less the appropriations. The 14 represents the 11,071,362.

Attachment number 1 Page 11 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 12 of 26

Tagged Passions:budget and funding

Director Demery stated that the City Council adopted a long range debt plan in August 2017 to fund approximately 10.4 million in priority projects over the next two fiscal years. The following is information about the projects being funded through debt financing or on a pay-as-you-go basis:

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council

Director Demery reported that regarding the NCDOT commitments on current unfunded projects, if the City leverages the 3,123,807 that the City Council discussed previously, the total amount of the projects completed in the City of Greenville over the next 3-5 years would be 121,980,377. This funding includes fund balance appropriated and some projected Capital Improvement Program budget appropriation, which is yet to be determined.

Director Demery stated the next steps are to have the Local Government Commission approve the audit and staff plans to submit this report for the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the 29th consecutive year.

Tagged Passions:budget, audit, capital spending, boards and commissions, council, Capital Spending, financial report, funding, finance, and program

Director Demery responded that the City Council will receive a transmittal letter in the CAFR (Comprehensive Annual Financial Report) and that will include an executive summary.

Mayor Smith thanked and commended staff for its hard work. She always likes to hear about reports with no findings. She appreciates staff managing the City s money and doing whatever is necessary for the City to receive the highest ratings on the audit. They deserve recognition.

Tagged Passions:audit, recognition, council, financial report, and finance

Council Member Smiley stated that the City s accounts receivable has dropped consistently over the last few years and that is powerful evidence that staff has been getting the accounting done, sending out the invoices, and the City is paid. For every dollar the City has in accounts receivable, the State makes the City reserve that dollar to another dollar in a bank account in case the City is not paid. When the City staff drops that number down to 7 million from 13 million, essentially the City is making 5 million available to the

Attachment number 1 Page 12 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 13 of 26

citizens of the City for the use in projects that will benefit them. That was not available before and that is all because of the strong work seen over the last few years. The auditors have spoken highly of this work.

Mayor Pro-Tem Glover commended City staff for their hard work and good relationship with the City s auditors.
Tagged Passions:audit and recognition

Motion was made by Mayor Pro-Tem Glover and seconded by Council Member Smiley to accept the Fiscal Year 2017 Audit Opinion and Audited Financial Statements. Motion carried unanimously.

REIMBURSEMENT RESOLUTION FOR THE CITY S STORMWATER REVENUE BONDS, SERIES 2018 (Resolution No. 059-17)
Tagged Passions:audit, council, financial report, finance, stormwater, and bond

Director of Financial Services Bernita Demery explained that this resolution is for the Town Creek Culvert project. The contract has been before the City Council and this reimbursement resolution will allow the City to be able to reimburse itself for costs expended prior to the bond sale. The bond sale is scheduled for February 2018. The reimbursement resolution is not to exceed 15 million.

Tagged Passions:services, contract, council, finance, stormwater, sale, and bond

Motion was made by Council Member Connelly and seconded by Mayor Pro-Tem Glover to adopt the reimbursement resolution. Motion carried unanimously.

Tagged Passions:council

UPDATE ON STREET LIGHTING AND CAMERAS

Tagged Passions:streets, traffic, and streetscape

Chief of Police Mark Holtzman gave an update on the progress and future plans for street lighting and cameras in the City. The safe neighborhoods concept means working at the neighborhood level to reduce the fear of crime and to improve safety and quality of life. The Greenville Police Department (GPD) uses both data-driven and community input to develop top priorities where lighting and public safety cameras are installed. The GPD operates under the belief that, through a focused effort, solutions can be found to long- standing issues and reputations of neighborhoods can be changed.

Public Works Director Kevin Mulligan stated that the City s approach to this concept consists of the following: Convert existing street lights to LED Install new public safety cameras Infill additional LED street lights/poles in neighborhoods New LED lighting on major roadways and area of high pedestrian traffic Director Mulligan reported that about 800 lights were done in the West Greenville area and some infill will be done in that area and other areas. New LED lighting was installed on Stantonsburg Road last year from Memorial Drive to Arlington Boulevard and Phase 2 of that project is to install LED lighting on Arlington Boulevard out to Allen Road. Attachment number 1 Page 13 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 14 of 26
Tagged Passions:streets, public safety, Public Works, Pedestrian, pole, neighborhood, traffic, public works, crime, and streetscape

Director Mulligan gave some street lighting facts, stating that the City has approximately 7,300 street lights and approximately 1,500 of those were converted to LED lighting. The City Manager s Office, GPD, and the Public Works Department met with the Greenville Utilities Commission (GUC) about converting the remaining street lights in the City to LED lighting. As part of its budget, the GUC staff discussed a multi-year plan to convert the remaining street lights in the City to LED and the City staff is working with the GUC to get a schedule. The annual City street light bill is approximately 1.5 million. As the City converts the remaining 6,000 lights, with each conversion, the City s street light bill goes up about 7 monthly.

Council Member Smiley asked in spite of it being understood that LED lights use less electricity, why does the cost go up when the lights are converted.
Tagged Passions:streets, budget, administrator, manager, boards and commissions, council, Utility, Public Works, utility, traffic, public works, and streetscape

Director Mulligan responded that LED lights are more expensive than the high pressure sodium or mercury vapor lights, but the prices are coming down. Regarding discussions on dark sky lights, the City is seeing some advantage of these LED lights. There is a lot of discussion about the blue light. The City is in Phase 1 of its LEDs transition. As the City moves forward over the next five years, the City will be looking at SMART street lights. Some examples are as one walks by a light it would come on automatically, emergency strobe lighting alerting people that emergency vehicles are coming down a road, and shot spotters are also used on some of the street lights. High pressure sodium lights are the yellow 30/60 globe lighting. The LED lights implemented by the City are focused downward.

Director Mulligan stated that a perfect example is what has happened to the 10th Street lighting, east of Greenville Boulevard where there were pedestrian and vehicular accidents. Half of those lights were converted to LED, stopping at Oxford Road and there are still high pressure sodium lights in the area. Installing LED lights have made a big difference.

Tagged Passions:streets, Pedestrian, emergency, traffic, and streetscape

Director Mulligan stated that beginning in 2016, Phase 1 of the LED lighting included the conversion of existing street lights that also included neighborhoods such as Kristin Drive, Riverbluff Road, and Wespointe Drive.

Chief Holtzman displayed the Phase 1 focused area in West Greenville, and stated that the results are impressive. Basically, Memorial Drive up to Dickinson Avenue and to the River were done. Citywide, total Part 1 crimes (violent and property crimes together) drop to 2 , but in the target area where LED lighting was installed, there was a 21 drop in total crime. Unfortunately, violent crime citywide is up 8 but property crime is down 10 in in that area. Attachment number 1 Page 14 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 15 of 26

Tagged Passions:streets, property, grocery, watershed, neighborhood, traffic, crime, and streetscape

Chief Holtzman stated that the drop in crime in West Greenville is not attributed all to the lighting. The GPD has staff working in this area daily. There has been a slight increase in calls for service regarding suspicious persons, which is wanted so that the community and the GPD can work together on solving problems.

Attachment number 1 Page 15 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 16 of 26

Tagged Passions:crime

Director Mulligan stated that regarding the new street lights for Stantonsburg Road between Arlington Boulevard and Memorial Drive, there is capital cost for these. If the new lights are installed on existing timber poles, there is not a capital cost. Usually in the City s major thoroughfares, either concrete poles or the decorated poles have be installed and if there is underground wire, there will be a linear footage cost. The cost is 83,000 for the new lights and poles to be installed on Stantonsburg Road between Arlington Boulevard and Memorial Drive.

Chief Holtzman gave information about the 100 existing public safety camera coverage in areas of Greenville, and stated that last year, there was a budget of 250,000 for street lighting and cameras. 76,225 was encumbered forward to the 2018 budget of 200,000. 56,400 was spent for lighting and 128,591 was spent for cameras, with a remainder of 102,347.

Tagged Passions:streets, budget, public safety, pole, traffic, and streetscape

Director Mulligan stated that certainly as some of the major North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) major corridors are being done such as Evans Street, Allen Road, or Firetower Road, the City will be looking at installing the street lights in those areas.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, corridor, traffic, transportation, and streetscape

Chief Holtzman stated that 11 cameras were placed midblock in the downtown area. Traditionally, cameras were installed by the NCDOT on major highways at intersections. The GPD is moving cameras closer to neighborhoods. Some cameras were done last year and at least a second camera will be installed along with blue LED lights at Sterling Pointe, Riverbluff Road, Kristen Drive, and West Pointe Drive. Some of the existing cameras are good enough to detect vehicular tag numbers. Some of the money was used by the Information Technology Department to purchase additional servers.

Chief Holtzman stated that about 400 lights will be installed in the uptown area with about 190 being decorative styled and the remainder being LED lights. That project is underway currently. This week the GUC reported that they are around 40 finished with that transition for the uptown area. The next project will include going back to West Greenville from Dickinson Avenue to Evans Street bordering somewhere along Arlington Boulevard. Some new wooden telephone poles will be needed to fill out specific neighborhoods with poorer lighting.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, pole, and neighborhood

Chief Holtzman stated that the third area is towards The Grid where five safety cameras were installed last year and some positive results were seen from a crime perspective. Willow Street is close to the River where there are almost no street lights and there is a lot of pedestrian traffic through the area. First Street has been done. He met with Mr. Williams at the Housing Authority about installing cameras and street lights in the public housing areas (Dubber-Laney Woods, Hopkins Park, East and West Meadowbrook, Moyewood, Newtown, and Kearney Park). They can be done with the current Phase 2.

Mayor Smith asked about the plans for lighting in the area across the River on Belvoir Road where an unfortunate death occurred. Attachment number 1 Page 16 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 17 of 26

Tagged Passions:streets, Pedestrian, watershed, housing, parks, traffic, crime, and streetscape

Director Mulligan responded that there would be a 3/5-year conversion of all existing lights to LED street lights. There will be a plan to put lighting in that area.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, traffic, and streetscape

Mayor Smith stated that waiting 3-5 years to address this concern is not appropriate especially since there has been a death where there are also no lights and sidewalks.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets and Pedestrian

City Manager Wall stated that she will work with staff where some lighting can be installed North of the River.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, and watershed

Chief Holtzman stated there are also plans for cameras to be spread across the City. For instance, they will be installed North of the River in Greenfield Terrace because there have been some vehicle break-ins in that area. Having cameras will make a big difference covering that in and out traffic.

Chief Holtzman stated that in working with the GPD Lieutenants at the police substations, he asked them to come up with locations for 20 cameras in each one of their zones by priority. It is known where the cameras are needed based on the zone commanders. Along with the new cameras, new white lights are required in order for them to work well. Mayor Smith asked if the City could benefit from installing cameras where there is lighting from the FoodLion near Easy Street. She does not want the GPD to look at only crime while some of the safety issues should be addressed as well. The City could use the lighting that is already there and would not pay additional funds.

Tagged Passions:streets, public safety, watershed, funding, traffic, and crime

Chief Holtzman stated that makes perfect sense.

No additional detail provided

Director Mulligan stated that the following are some of the costs for Capital Improvement Projects listed under Phase 3:

Attachment number 1 Page 17 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 18 of 26

Tagged Passions:capital spending and Capital Spending

Chief Holtzman stated that 115 cameras as well as servers would be installed at locations recommended by the zone commanders. Some of the City s major corridors could also be covered under the 525,000 for neighborhood cameras. Those cameras could be used for pattern type crime such as the last series of robberies in Greenville around Memorial Drive as well as where pedestrian fatalities have occurred. Having cameras in those areas are going to be helpful.

Director Mulligan explained how Memorial Drive and Stantonsburg Road were prioritized for LED lights due to traffic and pedestrian and vehicle accidents, and stated that doing all of Memorial Drive would cost close to 1 million.

Tagged Passions:streets, corridor, Pedestrian, neighborhood, traffic, and crime

Director Mulligan responded that Memorial Drive is the only NCDOT street that is not under design or construction. As they design Memorial Drive, there will be sidewalks and street lights on both sides and the turning lane issue will be addressed, making the City of Greenville a much safer environment. The cost would be above 1 million.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, Pedestrian, Conservation, construction, traffic, environment, and streetscape

Chief Holtzman stated that the exploration phase is partnering with certain neighborhoods to see if they want to match some dollars to purchase cameras. Of course, the City s priority is always going to be the hotspots, crime, and pedestrian areas, but a portion of the money could be used for cameras and a 50 match would be required from the neighborhoods. The GPD will look at other communities and see what they are doing. The GPD will use a similar data-driven approach to prioritize camera requests under this program. Also, GPD will explore a policy and bring that back to the City Council.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:purchasing, policy, council, Pedestrian, neighborhood, program, and crime

Chief Holtzman stated that last year, the GPD partnered with the University Neighborhood Association and they put up money for at least one camera and then ended up with five cameras. Some students had problems with getting downtown back to The Grid so cameras were installed at selected spots.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:downtown, university, students, and neighborhood

Chief Holtzman responded that they are 5,800 each.

No additional detail provided

Council Connelly asked whether the cameras are wireless whereby they can be moved around or are they hard wired.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council, wireless, and Wireless

Chief Holtzman responded that they are not wireless and the best ones are hard wired in and they do not have any cellphone coverage carrier costs and there is much better connectivity.

Chief Holtzman stated the GPD does have a handful of wireless that are moved around. They carry a monthly cellphone bill and the high definition is not there. Attachment number 1 Page 18 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 19 of 26

Tagged Passions:wireless and Wireless

Chief Holtzman explained that the camera would be the City s and it goes on the City s network and replacement clause. It is just a way to stretch some dollars further, and it must make sense from a community perspective and crime perspective. The GPD cannot partner with an affluent neighborhood that is not having a crime problem. That is something that would be addressed in the policy.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:policy, neighborhood, and crime

Chief Holtzman stated that is correct. Many of the GPD s new cameras are quad cameras looking in four directions at once and they are great for an intersection. If they are placed in the middle of the intersection, then not only the main corridor is covered but the in and out of a neighborhood is covered as well. That is a great way to use one.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:corridor and neighborhood

Infrastructure Manager Robert Hudson of the City s Information Technology Department responded that 6-8 years is the economic age for the new cameras.

Tagged Passions:manager, Technology, information technology, technology, and Information Technology

Council Member Connelly stated that probably when the City decides to budget next year, it would be in the City s best interest to give the GUC a number of street light locations early in the year.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, budget, council, traffic, and streetscape

Director Mulligan responded that staff would do that over the next month or two to agree on how many lights that the City and GUC can do in a year.

No additional detail provided

City Manager Wall stated that part of the purpose of staff s meeting with the GUC was to really map that strategy out for the next several years. That way both will know the target areas and what is planned. That way the GUC could plan and there is some predictability on the City s part.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, and strategic

Chief Holtzman stated that while the GUC is looking to do a larger scale as they move around the City and get it all done, they were very open to the idea that as a Police Chief he has crime hotspot areas. They are going to pop up and are not going to be on that map and the GUC understands that he needs help at jumping ahead and getting those done. The GUC said that they would save a portion of what the GUC would do each year to take care of anything else that starts to flare up before getting around to lighting everything at once. That was encouraging.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:public safety and crime

Council Member Mercer stated that one unhappy phenomenon is that the City pushes crime down in one area of the City and it pops up somewhere else. Some of the numbers given by staff were very encouraging. Council Member Mercer asked if those are absolute reduction

Attachment number 1 Page 19 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 20 of 26 numbers and if not, is there a general sense of how much of that crime might pop up somewhere else in the City.

Tagged Passions:crime

Chief Holtzman responded that there will always be crime. His sense is doing these whole districts at once makes a big impact. If it was done block by block, the City could easily shift that reputation throughout an entire district.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:crime

Director Mulligan responded that certainly staff needs to sit that down with the individual and get in detail what the exact concern is. LED is a brighter and more focused light, different from high pressure sodium or mercury vapor lights.

Director Mulligan stated that in 2013 when he presented the City s new lighting ordinance, the City was focusing on dark sky or downward focusing lighting. A commercial establishment had to meet the City s lighting ordinance so that the wash over from the commercial establishment to the residential neighborhoods would be less. The City was doing upgrades from one high pressure sodium to a brighter high pressure sodium and that is what was done at Westpointe and Kristen Drives. Now, the City is going back to install the LED lights.

Tagged Passions:commercial, ordinance, and neighborhood

Director Mulligan stated that it is a darker skylight. The LED focus is downward and staff has looked at that type of distribution and made sure that was part of it with the GUC. As this technology gets more and more established there is more time to review it. Certainly there are some articles from the American Medical Association stating that circadian rhythms are being thrown off by this light, but then there is the board that produces and oversees these lights saying that is not true. There is a lot of back and forth on that subject and with SMART street lighting some of that will be addressed.

BUDGET ORDINANCE AMENDMENT 4 TO THE 2017-2018 CITY OF GREENVILLE BUDGET (ORDINANCE 17-040) AND THE CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND (ORDINANCE 17-024) (Ordinance No. 17-061)

Tagged Passions:streets, budget, capital spending, ordinance, Capital Spending, Technology, technology, traffic, and streetscape

Motion was made by Council Member Mercer and seconded by Council Member Smiley to adopt budget ordinance amendment 4. Motion carried unanimously.

Attachment number 1 Page 20 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 21 of 26
Tagged Passions:budget and ordinance

CLEANING SIDEWALKS IN UPTOWN DISTRICT

Tagged Passions:streets and Pedestrian

Executive Director Bianca Shoneman of Uptown Greenville gave information regarding some of the recent efforts to beautify the uptown area. The beautiful rabbit painted on the wall outside the Starlight Cafe is a result of private dollars from the Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge. The lovely clock tower located at the corner of West 5th and Evans Streets was made possible with private investments. In 2012, seasonal flower planters were done with public dollars. Final touches were added to the trash receptacles located along Cotanche Street. The Greenville Public Works Department partnered with Uptown Greenville by dropping off the receptacles at an artist s studio and they were turned into works of art. A former gravel parking lot along 4th Street was turned into a pocket park, Live United Courtyard of Greenway, which is a 45,000 investment done mostly with private dollars. Forthcoming in spring 2018 is an entirely new banner system along First Street throughout the Uptown District and along the Dickinson Avenue corridor.

Building Grounds Superintendent Kevin Heifferon of the Public Works Department highlighted the City s services provided to the uptown area. Two or three of the Public Works Department s employees are uptown on a daily basis managing litter patrol, public trash cans, dumpster areas, and public landscape efforts. Sidewalk and street sweeping is done twice weekly. A low profile sweeper was purchased for the parking deck and is used for street sweeping as well.
Tagged Passions:streets, arts, superintendent, purchasing, services, restaurants, council, Public Works, Cell tower, corridor, Pedestrian, investment, cell tower, buildings and grounds, parking, and public works

Superintendent Heifferon explained some of the challenges of maintaining the urban core including overflowing dumpsters, gum on sidewalks, grease traps, cigarette butt litter, pets clean up and graffiti. A company removes the garbage from the dumpsters and the Public Works Department cleans them up as well. In the next couple of years, the City will have an influx of 1,500-1,600 students and nonstudents so there will be more people with pets in the downtown area. The Public Works Department works with the Greenville Police Department to remove the graffiti from traffic boxes and light poles as quickly as possible. Many of the landscape areas in the downtown zone become a place for people to flick out cigarette butts and that is disappointing because City employees work hard to keep these beautification areas enhanced. Gum has accumulated on the sidewalks for decades because no thorough sidewalk cleaning has been done.

Tagged Passions:streets, superintendent, pets, public safety, downtown, Public Works, Pedestrian, pole, buildings and grounds, tobacco, students, traffic, and public works

Director Shoneman stated that Uptown Greenville met with some of the Members of the City Council and City staff to discuss how to manage the growth of new residents living downtown. There has also been a growth in the cultural events hosted and partnered by the City of Greenville and Uptown Greenville. So moving forward, the banners will be on a regular rotation and the seasonal planter s maintenance is as strong as it can be. Perhaps, a look will be taken to determine whether to commercialize that banner system. Pressure washing the sidewalk and gum removal are what many urban cores do on a regular basis. As the commercial district grows, there are greater cultural offerings, more culinary amenities come online, and how the downtown area manages it trash becomes ever more relevant. Uptown Greenville is seeing the pressures of the success began to be imploded

Attachment number 1 Page 21 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 22 of 26 upon them. There has been early discussions of creating a cleanliness taskforce or beautification committee to address these challenges. Mayor Smith asked why the gum has never been removed from the sidewalks.

Tagged Passions:streets, commercial, downtown, Pedestrian, events, and growth

Superintendent Heifferon responded that it is certainly highly labor intensive pressure washing, water, traffic control, and pedestrian control. A small area on Cotanche Street was done in 2016 by him and another employee. They came in at 3:00 a.m. and cleaned a 100 ft. section, basically from the parking deck to the corner of Cotanche and 5th Streets. Four hours of their labor, a truck, and 600 gallons of water were required and it was successful for a couple of weeks, but then quickly there is the return of discoloration and more gum on the sidewalk.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, superintendent, Utility, Pedestrian, parking, utility, traffic, transportation, and water

Superintendent Heifferon stated that staff is proposing a pilot program, investing some money in pressure washing, and to do it with contract dollars plus to get the ball rolling on continual maintenance on some of the sidewalks. Pressure washing done incorrectly scars and ruins the sidewalks.

Mayor Smith asked about the cost of pressure washing.

Tagged Passions:streets, superintendent, contract, Pedestrian, and program

Superintendent Heifferon responded that the worst areas uptown with the most gum and discoloration on the sidewalks are 5th Street from Washington to Reade Circle, Evans Street to 4th and 5th Streets, and Cotanche Street from 4th Street to Reade Circle. Staff is proposing the pilot program with an estimate of 24,000.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, superintendent, Pedestrian, and program

Council Member Mercer stated that regarding the proposed cleanliness task force, Uptown Greenville would want to make sure to work with the City staff to help coordinate the pressure washing with the Community Appearance Commission.

Mayor Smith asked about the timeframe for the pressure washing.

Tagged Passions:boards and commissions and council

Superintendent Heifferon responded that the 24,000 is for a one-time cleaning. That area would probably take a professional crew a week to complete, working generally during the night.

Mayor Smith asked where the funds are coming from for the payment of the pressure washing contracted services.

Tagged Passions:superintendent, services, contract, and funding

Superintendent Heifferon responded that the funds would be paid out of contracted services from the Public Works Department budget. It was not budgeted for, but staff will try to negotiate a lower price and to accommodate the cost in the departmental budget to try to get it done.

Mayor Smith asked how many times a year would the sidewalks be pressure washed. Attachment number 1 Page 22 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 23 of 26

Tagged Passions:streets, superintendent, budget, services, contract, Public Works, Pedestrian, funding, and public works

Superintendent Heifferon stated that staff is asking to plant a seed, get traction and for this to occur in this area two or three times a year. Constant maintenance is required.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:superintendent and plant

City Manager Wall stated that staff originally had discussions with Uptown Greenville about the need to institutionalize the upkeep of the sidewalks going forward. So, if the City were to make this investment what would Uptown Greenville and business owners in that uptown core do to preserve the City s investment to clean the sidewalks? That whole idea of the addition of a cleanliness task force is so that the City can make sure that if the City does this work that it is continued and does not all fall back on the City to maintain those sidewalks.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, administrator, manager, Pedestrian, investment, and business

Mayor Smith stated that the gum on the sidewalks is bad, but the cigarette butts are disturbing. If the City is willing to invest any money for the sidewalk cleanup for gum removal, which would benefit the businesses, then the businesses should also be mindful of their patrons putting those cigarette butts all over the City. She has taken pictures and it is horrible for a new area, especially behind the parking deck, to be in that condition.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, Pedestrian, tobacco, parking, and business

Mayor Smith stated that the business owners must take a part in this as well. The cost of having Public Works employees working in the area daily doing things that they should not have to be redirected to help with the cost of gum removal. There is a lot of discussion about uptown, but the entire City must be represented. The City must have discussions with the business owners to ensure their commitment and buy-in. If they are not committed, that is challenging for the City to be committed and is an issue.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:Public Works, public works, and business

Superintendent Heifferon stated that the City employees blow off the sidewalks and sweep the streets and curbs every Friday and Monday. A walk behind vacuum is used for some of the more littered areas such as Cotanche Street between 5th Street and Reade Circle.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, superintendent, and Pedestrian

Director Shoneman stated that Uptown Greenville has also been working with some of the students who have community service hours to pick up cigarette butts. Uptown Greenville thoughts are about doing a service initiative for them to clean up the Uptown District on Thursdays and Fridays. Their services were used for FreeBoot Fridays and PirateFest. This might be a way to institutionalize the upkeep of the sidewalks a little bit more by getting more activity from the Uptown Greenville s community service program.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, services, Pedestrian, tobacco, students, and program

Superintendent Heifferon responded that it is littering, which is a crime.

Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 24 of 26

Tagged Passions:superintendent and crime

Superintendent Heifferon responded that he believes the City could do that.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:superintendent

Council Member Connelly stated that one of the reasons that he asked that this item be placed on the agenda is that gum may have been removed from a small section of Cotanche Street, but those sidewalks look the same as when he was in college. One of the things done in the uptown area is a significant amount of investment. The City should step up and show that it is willing to invest in that area as well.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, council, university, Pedestrian, and investment

Council Member Connelly stated that it is a challenge and there will be issues with local businesses in the uptown area that may not be maintaining their property. He has heard that businesses are dumping dirty water on sidewalks and that attributes to the dirt and grime as well. Ultimately, it is going to be just as important for Uptown Greenville, elected officials, and City staff to sit down with some of those owners and let them know that the City is doing its part. The City is doing a great job on Dickinson Avenue however the older section of uptown needs love too.

Mayor Smith stated that The Dream Park has the same issue on the picnic tables and the concrete with gum, dirt, and grime. If the City Council votes on this now and does not have that same commitment to other areas, then what message is that sending? She is surprised that the City Council would be put on the spot to vote on the 24,000 funding for the contracted services without making sure there is a plan to address not just uptown but other areas that have a high concentration of the same thing.

Tagged Passions:streets, property, services, contract, council, Utility, Pedestrian, funding, parks, utility, solid waste, business, and water

Mayor Smith stated that also, the entire City should be cleaned on a rotating basis under a contracted service so that comments are not being made by one side of the City about what has been done for this area and not for that area. That should be avoided as much as possible.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:contract

City Manager Wall stated that this recommendation is only for a one-time 24,000 to do this pilot project with the idea that Uptown Greenville would work with a proposed cleanliness task force to institutionalize keeping the sidewalks clean.

City Manager Wall directed Gary Fenton to make sure that the issues of cleanliness are addressed as soon as possible at The Dream Park regarding gum and the tables. Mayor Smith suggested that a motion for both the uptown area and the tables and concrete at The Dream Park be addressed.

Tagged Passions:streets, administrator, manager, Pedestrian, and parks

City Manager Wall stated that this is a partnership between the City and those merchants in the uptown and both entities need to work together.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

Motion was made by Council Member Connelly and seconded by Council Member Smiley to authorize the City Manager to move forward with the pilot program for pressure washing and gum removal on sidewalks in the designated uptown area and on the concrete and tables at The Dream Park. Motion carried unanimously.

Attachment number 1 Page 24 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 25 of 26
Tagged Passions:streets, administrator, manager, Pedestrian, parks, and program

Mayor Pro-Tem Glover stated that The Dream Park is next to the Community Crossroads Center and their clients are using both picnic shelters. There is a constant overflow of people at the Center needing something to do until they find employment or their residence time has expired at the Center. Knowing that the Center s programs are based on contributions and she realizes the residents at the Center need a place to go during the day, but a building is vacant in the area and maybe programs can be designed for their clients at that building.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:parks, program, and employment

Mayor Pro-Tem Glover stated that the Park Rangers have done a good job of trying to keep them off the tables and benches. The City needs to work with the Community Crossroads Center and look at what could be done to provide its clients computers for seeking employment. She has been informed that the residents at the Center have taken away the amenities for the children and during their presence parents will not allow their children to play in The Dream Park. The only time that the residents at the Center cannot use that area is when the water park is open.

Mayor Pro-Tem Glover directed City Manager Wall to work with the Community Crossroads Center and City staff and make sure that they understand that the Dream Park should be kept clean. CITY MANAGER S REPORT City Manager Ann Wall recognized Purchasing Manager Denisha Harris of the Financial Services Division for completing the Leading for Results course offered by the Local Government Federal Credit Union. Denisha was selected from a group of 135 people and is one of 50 who were asked to participate in this program. The program really identifies emerging leaders in local government.

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, purchasing, recognition, services, Utility, computers, finance, parks, utility, program, parents, employment, and water

Update of GTAC

City Manager Wall stated that she wanted to provide the City Council with a brief update on the Greenville Transportation Activity Center (GTAC) project because good things happening in Greenville should be recognized.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, recognition, council, and transportation

Director of Public Works Kevin Mulligan reported that the GTAC has been under construction since November 2016. Not only is the City doing a proposed two-story building as well as bus bays, but also the City is rebuilding Bonners Lane, Park Street, and Pitt Street and there will be a new street. There will be new gas, sewer, electric, and stormwater so all of the utilities will be replaced. Pitt Street has been replaced and the northern section of Bonners Lane has started. The City is appreciative of the businesses patience as this project is underway.

Attachment number 1 Page 25 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, November 13, 2017 Page 26 of 26
Tagged Passions:streets, Utility, Public Works, Public Transit, electric, stormwater, parks, utility, construction, public works, sewer, and business

Director Mulligan displayed photos of the GTAC site plan, an aerial view from the northeast, and another aerial view as of November 2017 showing some of the wood treatments and construction in progress. He stated that the amount of construction and all the coordination going on with brand new utilities and the construction across from Pitt Street have led to issues with the schedule. Therefore, the project will be completed May 2018.

Mayor Smith stated that this is a wonderful project and she appreciates staff s fight on making sure that the project is completed.
Tagged Passions:streets, Utility, utility, and construction

Motion was made by Council Member Barr and seconded by Mayor Pro-Tem Glover to change the name of the Greenville Transportation Activity Center in honor of Congressman G. K. Butterfield. Motion carried unanimously.

COMMENTS FROM MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL
Tagged Passions:council and transportation

The Mayor and City Council made comments about past and future events.

ADJOURNMENT There being no further business before the City Council, motion was made by Council Member Mercer and seconded by Council Member Barr to adjourn the meeting. Motion carried unanimously, and Mayor Smith declared the meeting adjourned at 9:05 p.m. Respectfully Submitted Polly Jones Deputy City Clerk Attachment number 1 Page 26 of 26

Tagged Passions:council, events, and business

PROPOSED MINUTES MEETING OF THE CITY COUNCIL

Tagged Passions:council

CITY OF GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA MONDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2017

A regular meeting of the Greenville City Council was held on Monday, December 11, 2017 in the Council Chambers, located on the third floor at City Hall, with Mayor Kandie D. Smith presiding. Mayor Smith called the meeting to order at 6:00 p.m., after which Father Ian VanHeusen of the Saint Peters Catholic Church gave the invocation. The Greenville Fire-Rescue Department Honor Guard, accompanied by the Greenville Public Safety Pipe and Drum Corps, presented the colors. As Ms. Charity Smith sang the Star Spangled Banner, Ms. Michelle Forbes recited the words of the National Anthem. Both are from A Place in the Heart Theatre Company. The Pledge of Allegiance was led by youth, including Mary Kate Connelly, Caroline Connelly, Everett Litchfield, Connor Meyerhoeffer, and Kennedy Moore as well as Council Member-Elect William F. Litchfield, Jr. Those Present: Mayor Kandie D. Smith, Mayor Pro-Tem Rose H Glover, and Council Members Calvin R. Mercer, McLean Godley and Rick Smiley, along with Mayor-Elect P. J. Connelly, and Council Members-Elect Brian V. Meyerhoeffer, Jr., Will Bell and William F. Litchfield, Jr. Those Absent: None Also Present:
Tagged Passions:public safety, youth, church, and charity

Ann E. Wall, City Manager; Emanuel D. McGirt, City Attorney; Carol L. Barwick, City Clerk; and Polly W. Jones, Deputy City Clerk

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator, legal, and manager

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFIED ELECTION RESULTS

Tagged Passions:voting and election

City Manager Ann E. Ward read the names of the individuals receiving the most votes for the Office of Mayor and the six seats on the Greenville City Council during the November 8, 2017 general election as certified by the Pitt County Board of Elections. The following individuals received the highest number of votes:

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, council, voting, board of elections, and election

P.
J. Connelly Mayor Brian V. Meyerhoeffer, Jr. Council Member At-Large Kandie D. Smith Council Member, District 1 Rose H. Glover Council Member, District 2 Will Bell Council Member, District 3 Rick Smiley Council Member, District 4 William F. Litchfield, Jr. Council Member, District 5

Attachment number 2 Page 1 of 3 Proposed Minutes: Monday, December 11, 2017

Tagged Passions:council

Meeting of the Greenville City Council

Page 2 of 3 INSTALLATION CEREMONY
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Judge Marvin Blount, III administered the Oath of Office to incoming elected officials, beginning with Mayor P. J. Connelly and followed by Council Members Brian V. Meyerhoeffer, Kandie Smith, Rose H. Glover, Will Bell, Rick Smiley and William F. Litchfield, Jr.

Tagged Passions:legal, council, and judge

ELECTION OF MAYOR PRO-TEM

Mayor Connelly called for nominations for the selection of Mayor Pro-Tem.
Tagged Passions:voting, selection, and election

Hearing no further nominations, Mayor Connelly declared that the nominations period was closed. Mayor Connelly then called for a vote on the nomination of Council Member Glover for Mayor Pro-Tem. The vote in favor of Council Member Glover was unanimous.

Mayor Connelly announced that Council Member Glover received a majority vote and was elected Mayor Pro-Tem. OPENING ADDRESS
Tagged Passions:hearing and council

Mayor Connelly thanked his family members and supporters during the current election, and he read the following press release:

Greenville Means Business This is truly an exciting time for the City of Greenville as we welcome three new members to the City Council, and I am honored that the citizens put their faith in me to guide the City as Mayor. I look forward to working closely with the Council and City staff during the next two years as we move Greenville forward with an emphasis on jobs expansion and economic growth. Greenville is a great place to live for so many reasons. We are the medical, economic, educational, cultural, and industrial hub of Eastern North Carolina, and people recognize Attachment number 2 Page 2 of 3 Proposed Minutes: Monday, December 11, 2017
Tagged Passions:recognition, council, expansion, voting, industrial, election, growth, business, and jobs

Meeting of the Greenville City Council

Page 3 of 3 that. As a result, we are in a time of unprecedented growth. Our responsibility as a Council is to ensure that we have purposeful growth that makes the most sense for our community. With that in mind, I want to let everyone know that Greenville means business. Moving forward, we will focus on growing the tax base, maintaining and improving our infrastructure, and enhancing public safety in an effort to make our city more appealing to both businesses and families. We are on a great trajectory, but we must be sure to partner with our local, state, and federal leaders to further advance our community to the next level. A strong emphasis will be placed on a joint effort to grow our community as a whole, not separate like we have seen in the past. If we truly want to take Greenville to the next level, we will work together to achieve greatness. More than 600 million has been invested in our vibrant Uptown District over the last decade and we have laid the groundwork for those investments and future investments by offering low taxes and utility rates and overall low cost of business. Additionally, our community features other valuable assets such as a national university in East Carolina University that is one of only three in the country with a medical, dental, and engineering school, and one of the State s largest community colleges in Pitt Community College. Both provide high quality workforce training and produce skilled graduates, who are ready to jump into the work force. We also have a state-of-the- art regional medical facility in Vidant that keeps our community healthy and productive. We want Greenville to be the destination of choice for families and we want to keep our young professionals here, but we can only do that if the jobs are available. Let's continue to build off of our recent momentum by utilizing the assets that are here and being proactive in our decision- making so we are competitive in securing new jobs and investments. So, Greenville means business. So, let s get to work. ADJOURNMENT Mayor Pro-Tem Glover moved to adjourn the meeting, seconded by Council Member Meyerhoeffer. There being no further discussion, the motion passed by unanimous vote and Mayor Connelly adjourned the meeting at 6:38 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Polly Jones, CMC Deputy City Clerk
Tagged Passions:arts, taxes, Taxes, public safety, education, council, Utility, rates, university, investment, training, workforce, utility, growth, facility, job creation, business, and jobs

Attachment number 2 Page 3 of 3

PROPOSED MINUTES MEETING OF THE CITY COUNCIL

Tagged Passions:council

CITY OF GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA MONDAY, JANUARY 8, 2018

The Greenville City Council met in a regular meeting on the above date at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers, third floor of City Hall, with Mayor P. J. Connelly presiding. The meeting was called to order, followed by the invocation by Council Member William F. Litchfield, Jr. and the Pledge of Allegiance. Those Present: Mayor P. J. Connelly, Mayor Pro-Tem Rose H Glover, and Council Members Kandie D. Smith, Will Bell, Rick Smiley, William F. Litchfield, Jr. and Brian V. Meyerhoeffer, Jr. Those Absent: None Also Present:

Ann E. Wall, City Manager; Emanuel D. McGirt, City Attorney; Carol L. Barwick, City Clerk; and Polly W. Jones, Deputy City Clerk

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator, legal, and manager

APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA

Council Member Smith requested to add the resolution to close an unnamed alleyway located North of Dickinson Avenue and East of Pitt Street on the agenda as the last item under New Business.
Tagged Passions:streets, council, and business

Motion was made by Council Member Smith and seconded by Council Member Smiley to approve the agenda with the recommended change. Motion carried unanimously.

Tagged Passions:council

Motion was made by Council Member Smith and seconded by Council Member Smiley to approve the remaining items on the agenda. Motion carried unanimously.

PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD David Barham No Address Given Mr. Barham expressed his concern about the original invocation by Imam Shalik Fuzilahmed, which was delivered in a language other than English at the December 14, 2017 City Council meeting. As he requested, City staff gave him a copy of the prayer allegedly in English, which was distributed to the Mayor and City Council at the meeting. It Attachment number 3 Page 1 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 2 of 26 would probably take about 30 seconds to say that prayer in English, however, his original prayer was longer. Mr. Barham also made comments about how Muslim women are discriminated against under Sharia. Marion Blackburn 802 River Hill Drive Ms. Blackburn asked the new City Council to focus on some changes and protections for animals. She made comments about a need for improved ordinances and reform such as a nonprofit Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) program for cats, a non-tether ordinance for dogs, and a ban on commercial exhibition of exotic animals. During the recent inclement weather, she received many telephone calls about kittens being outdoors, cats trying to find housing, and dogs on chains and without decent housing. This is an opportunity for the City to look at not being that type of community.
Tagged Passions:commercial, pets, ordinance, animal control, watershed, religion, housing, and program

Ms. Blackburn stated that the City should allow cats to be fed and should allow the nonprofits to operate the City s TNR program so that the City would have people using their own money and time and volunteer abilities to sterilize cats rather than the City giving them citations. There are nonprofits that will put up a fence for dogs instead of having them on chains. Animals such as tigers and elephants are mistreated when they are not being exhibited.

Pam Strickland 4128 Dale Drive, Farmville, NC Ms. Strickland stated that she is the founder of the Eastern NC Stop Human Trafficking Now and the facilitator for the Pitt County Coalition Against Human Trafficking. She introduced two of the members of the Pitt County Coalition Against Human Trafficking, Victoria Johnson and Lenore Freeman. January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month and she is appreciative of Mayor Connelly signing the proclamation declaring it in Greenville. Ms. Johnson read the following proclamation for Human Trafficking Awareness Month: COPY

Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, Clemson, human rights, volunteer, and program

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR, CITY OF GREENVILLE

c v t t

WHEREAS, human trafficking involves the recruitment, harboring, transportation or provision of a person for labor or commercial sex through the use of force, fraud or coercion; and

WHEREAS, human trafficking violates basic human rights and deprives victims of human dignity and freedom. Victims are dehumanized and forced into modern-day slavery; and Attachment number 3 Page 2 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 3 of 26

Tagged Passions:commercial, public safety, boating, ports, human rights, civil rights, and transportation

WHEREAS, it is imperative that we educate our communities, our young people and families to take an active interest in learning how to recognize the risks and resist predators who use coercion and threats to manipulate children as young as 12 into labor or sex trafficking; and

WHEREAS, in recognition of the need for that education, the NC General Assembly recently enacted legislation mandating that sex trafficking prevention and awareness information be included in the sexual health education curriculum; and WHEREAS, in recognition of the importance of access to services, the NC General Assembly enacted legislation effective January 1, 2018 requiring that many businesses post the National Human Trafficking Hotline; and WHEREAS, the City of Greenville is committed to protecting people vulnerable to human trafficking and taking action to end human trafficking through prevention, prosecution, and partnerships; NOW, THEREFORE, I, P.J. Connelly, Mayor of the City of Greenville, do hereby proclaim January 2017 as

Tagged Passions:education, recognition, services, human rights, risk, health, curriculum, and business

HUMAN TRAFFICKING AWARENESS PREVENTION MONTH

Tagged Passions:human rights

in Greenville and commend its observance to all citizens.

This 8th day of January 2017.

Tagged Passions:recognition

P.
J. Connelly, Mayor

COPY

Ms. Strickland stated that the Greenville Police Department is an active member of the Pitt County Coalition Against Human Trafficking.

John Joseph Laffiteau Rodeway Inn and Suites, Room 253, 301 Greenville Blvd. SE Mr. Laffiteau stated that he is currently a student at Pitt Community College, taking a course in Computer Science as well as Cultural Humanities. Some time ago, a small personnel matter occurred in the East Branch of Sheppard Memorial Library. This is an attempt to reduce this misinterpretation of the staff and its consequences. Mr. Laffiteau presented two New York Times Magazine articles regarding artificial intelligence to City Clerk Carol Barwick.

Tagged Passions:personnel, public safety, hotel, university, human rights, and library

Attachment number 3 Page 3 of 26

Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 4 of 26 CONSENT AGENDA City Manager Ann Wall introduced the following items on the Consent Agenda:
Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

Minutes from the August 10, 2017 City Council meeting

Electric Capital Project Budget Ordinance for Greenville Utilities Commission s Greenville 115 kV Transmission Circuit 18 Flood Mitigation Project - (Ordinance No. 18-001)

Tagged Passions:budget, capital spending, boards and commissions, ordinance, Capital Spending, Utility, flooding, electric, and utility

Electric Capital Project Budget Ordinance and reimbursement resolution for Greenville Utilities Commission s Greenville 230 kV West Substation Flood Mitigation Project (Ordinance No. 18-002)

Tagged Passions:budget, capital spending, boards and commissions, ordinance, Capital Spending, Utility, flooding, electric, and utility

Removed For Separate Discussion Ordinance Repealing Sunset Provision Regarding alcohol Service and Consumption at the Town Common

Tagged Passions:ordinance and alcohol

Removed For Separate Discussion Adoption of Updated Policy and Procedures for the Service and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages within Greenville Recreation and Parks Department Parks and Facilities

Tagged Passions:policy, alcohol, procedure, parks, and recreation

Various tax refunds greater than 100

Council Member Smith requested to remove the ordinance repealing the sunset provision regarding alcohol service and consumption at the Town Common and the adoption of the undated policy and procedures for the service and consumption of alcoholic beverages within Greenville Recreation and Parks Department parks and facilities under the Consent Agenda for separate discussion.
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, policy, ordinance, council, alcohol, procedure, parks, and recreation

Motion was made by Council Member Smiley and seconded by Council Member Smith to approve the remaining items under the Consent Agenda. Motion carried unanimously.

CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS FOR SEPARATE DISCUSSION ORDINANCE REPEALING SUNSET PROVISION REGARDING ALCOHOL SERVICE AND CONSUMPTION AT THE TOWN COMMON (Ordinance No. 18-003)
Tagged Passions:ordinance, council, and alcohol

City Manager Wall explained that the requested action to be considered by the City Council would simply strike a section of language out of the current ordinance regarding the sunset provision, which provided the ability to sell alcohol at the Town Common and expired as of

Attachment number 3 Page 4 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 5 of 26

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, ordinance, and alcohol

City Manager Wall explained that the next item, which was also removed from the Consent Agenda for separate discussion, makes two additional changes to the policy and procedures which govern alcohol in the Town Common. The changes remove the start time for the sale of alcohol as well as the provision requiring fencing. Those two additional changes were approved by the City Council at its December 14, 2017 meeting. Staff agreed to bring back to the City Council in February 2018 specific changes and recommendations regarding what that procedure would look like as staff evaluate and review people who are interested in selling and serving alcohol on the Town Common.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, policy, council, alcohol, procedure, and sale

Motion was made by Council Member Smith and seconded by Council Member Bell to adopt the ordinance repealing the sunset provision regarding alcohol service and consumption at the Town Common. Motion carried unanimously.

Tagged Passions:ordinance, council, and alcohol

ADOPTION OF UPDATED POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR THE SERVICE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITH GREENVILLE RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT PARKS AND FACILITIES

Tagged Passions:policy, alcohol, procedure, parks, and recreation

Motion was made by Council Member Smith and seconded by Council Member Bell to adopt the updated policy and procedures. Motion carried unanimously.

NEW BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS BY BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
Tagged Passions:policy, boards and commissions, council, procedure, and business

Environmental Advisory Commission Chairperson Durk Tyson reported that the Environmental Advisory Commission (EAC) is tasked to make recommendations on matters of environmental concern and to serve as a technical advisor to the City Council. Chairperson Tyson summarized the adopted goals of the EAC for 2018:

Attachment number 3 Page 5 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 6 of 26 EAC Goals
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions and environment

1.
Identify and deploy ways to promote environmental education and engage citizens (including students) in addressing environmental (sustainability) issues.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:education, sustainability, students, and environment

Actions: a) Increase public awareness of the Watershed Master Plans. b) Continue to administer and champion the EAC Grant Program. c) Participate in 2017 Earth Week Events. d) Develop educational segments for GTV9 that highlight EAC s mission and current initiatives. e) Increase recycling initiatives.

Tagged Passions:recycling, watershed, events, program, and grant

2.
Continue engagement with Council and other Boards and Commissions.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:boards and commissions and council

Actions: a) Assign commission members (liaisons) to follow Boards and Commissions that may consider and/or advise on environmental issues. The liaisons will provide quarterly updates to EAC on topics that have potential for partnering or collaboration.

Redevelopment Commission Durk Tyson Greenville Utilities Commission Durk Tyson Greenville Bike Pedestrian Commission Emilie Kane Recreation and Parks Commission Nathaniel Hamilton Community Appearance Commission David Ames Neighborhood Advisory Board Ann Maxwell Public Transportation Parking Commission Emilie Kane Planning Zoning Commission Drake Brinkley
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, Utility, Bicycles, Pedestrian, parking, zoning, neighborhood, utility, recreation, bicycles, transportation, planning, and environment

3.
Identify and suggest ways to reduce volume of our waste.

No additional detail provided

Actions: Toured East Carolina Vocational Center

Tagged Passions:vocational education

4.
Seek ways to conserve and protect our water resources.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, and water

Actions: a) Provide guidance and recommendations to City Council on the utilization of the

Watershed Master Plans. This includes water quality monitoring results completed as part of the master planning process.

Tagged Passions:council, Utility, watershed, utility, planning, and water

5.
Identify ways to increase renewable energy production.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:energy

Status: In partnership with Sierra Club, EAC will continue collaboration in presenting a Clean Energy Discussion to highlight best management practices that may be utilized

Attachment number 3 Page 6 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 7 of 26 within the City of Greenville. Actions: a) Facilitate Commission and/or Council presentation on renewable energy options for City activities. b) Develop resolution focusing on adoption of renewable energy initiatives. c) Explore feasibility of Sustainability Coordinator for the City of Greenville.

Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, clean energy, sustainability, energy, and environment

Chairperson Tyson stated that the EAC is available to serve the City Council in any way possible. If the City Council needs information on environmental concerns, they would love to research it for the City Council. If there is anything that the members could do to move initiatives forward they would like to support that as well.

Affordable Housing Loan Committee Chairperson William Kitchin explained that the primary functions of the Affordable Housing Loan Committee (AHLC) are

Tagged Passions:council, housing, and environment

1.
To approve loans made under the Affordable Housing Bond Programs for first time

homebuyer down payment assistance, home mortgages, and elderly homeowner rehabilitation loans. 2. To make recommendations to City Council regarding the purchase of land to be used for affordable housing developments, creation and set up of loan pool mortgage agreements with other financial institutions and making changes in funding allocations by funding category.

Tagged Passions:purchasing, council, development, funding, finance, housing, bond, Development, and program

3.
To review Subrecipient applications, consider program information presented by

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:program

nonprofit representatives, evaluate how requests meet the needs of the community, and make funding recommendations to the Greenville City Council.

Tagged Passions:council and funding

4.
To review other housing related policies and activities as deemed appropriate by the

Greenville City Council.

Tagged Passions:council and housing

Chairperson Kitchin reported some of the accomplishments made by the AHLC during the past year. The AHLC approved down payment Assistance to three families and the AHLC approved Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) service funding in the amount of 100,000. The following were awarded to local nonprofits:

Pitt County Council on Aging - 11,000 to support their efforts to provide home safety assessments and fall prevention education for low to moderate income households of senior residents. The Greenville Community Shelters DBA Community Crossroads Center - 8,961 to provide VI-SPDAT s and psychosocial assessments to shelter residents resulting in a referral to the Housing Stabilization Committee and possibly, Attachment number 3 Page 7 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 8 of 26 permanent housing Center for Family Violence Prevention - 20,000 to continue providing families impacted by domestic violence with needed counseling, case management and advocacy services. Boys and Girls Clubs of the Coastal Plain - 16,000 to continue operation of the Club Academy program, a comprehensive academic success program designed to help youth excel academically.
Tagged Passions:education, services, development, youth, domestic violence, funding, housing, Development, cdbg, program, grant, and community development

L.I.F.E. of NC, Inc. - 16,000 to provide workforce education, experience and training for local participants of the Pitt County Reentry Program.

East Carolina University/Lucille W. Gorham Intergenerational Community Center - 15,039 to promote healthy community mentoring relationships and expose youth to educational and cultural experiences with planned trips and activities.

Tagged Passions:education, university, youth, training, mentoring, community center, workforce, and program

Literacy Volunteers of America - Pitt County - 13,000 to provide workforce education and literacy instruction through GAIN assessments, Computer Basics, Application I and II, WorkKeys (a work readiness program) and Career Readiness Certification for participants.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:education, volunteer, instruction, workforce, program, and literacy

Chairperson Kitchin stated that additionally, the AHLC recommended approval of 18,200 to acquire and install applicable equipment as well as facility rental for a Food Service Special Program at the Greenville Community Shelters d/b/a Community Crossroads Center. This was done through the use of CDBG economic development funding. They showed a real need for the funding, which was fortunately available.

Chairperson Kitchin reported other accomplishments of the AHLC during the past year. The members of the AHLC reviewed federal and local documents: 1) 2016-2017 Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER), 2) 2017-2018 Annual Action Plan, and 3) Citizen Participation Plan. The members voted on the reallocation of funds for subrecipients and the agreement extension requests submitted by them. Also, financial literacy series were provided to homeowners, who applied for assistance, and Homeownership Education Workshops and an Annual Non-Profit Workshop were held. It is unknown at this point how much CDBG money will be available, but the AHLC is looking forward to finding out and reporting to the City Council about its allocation next year.

Tagged Passions:education, council, development, rental, equipment, funding, finance, performance, Development, cdbg, facility, program, literacy, and economic development

PRESENTATION OF THE STUDENT AND MARKET-RATE HOUSING ANALYSIS

Tagged Passions:housing and market

Chief Planner Thomas Weitnauer stated that during its June 5, 2017 meeting, the City Council authorized issuance of a Request For Proposal to solicit a real estate consultant to prepare a study market rate housing analysis. The report was requested to determine

Attachment number 3 Page 8 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 9 of 26 whether the supply of private dormitories and market-rate apartments, existing and approved for construction, have saturated or will saturate the housing market. Chief Planner Weitnauer stated that on September 14, 2017, the City executed a contract with Kimley-Horn to conduct the study. Over the past three months, Kimley-Horn has followed the City s project scheduling and conducted numerous tasks including holding a public input session and conducting stakeholder interviews.
Tagged Passions:services, contract, housing, construction, and market

Chief Planner Weitnauer stated that on behalf of the City, the project was managed by Lead Planner Mike Dail and by Jessica Rossi on behalf of Kimley-Horn, who is present to give the report.

No additional detail provided

Ms. Rossi stated that Kimley-Horn performed the following tasks:

Described economic drivers and community anchors Profiled East Carolina University (ECU) and Pitt Community College (PCC) student enrollment Prepared comparable university case studies Analyzed employment and demographic trends Reviewed performance of existing student and market-rate apartment product Highlighted announced apartment development activity Reconciled current and future supply with projected demand

Tagged Passions:development, university, performance, enrollment, Development, market, and employment

Ms. Rossi reported two things were not part of Kimley-Horn s scope of services that could, in the future, potentially offer additional investigation. Their scope does not include an analysis of affordable housing and land use policy recommendations, based on the findings.

Ms. Rossi reported that a number of outreach activities were done to make sure the numbers arrived at were supported by qualitative or community feedback. Two rounds of stakeholder interviews were done starting first with the public-sector. They met with ECU, PCC, the Neighborhood Advisory Board, Planning and Zoning Commission, Uptown Greenville, Chamber of Commerce, City Manager s Office, Office of Economic Development, Greenville City Council, ECU Student Government Association and ECU Transit, and then with private-sector stakeholders (Vidant Medical Center and local engineering firms, developers, and property management companies). Ms. Rossi reported that a public workshop was held on October 3, 2017 with about 15 people in attendance. Community members gave their opinions on apartment housing in Greenville. Also, Kimley-Horn had an ECU student forum on November 6, 2017. Ms. Rossi stated that in terms of the local education profiles, ECU has a total enrollment in this current school year of 29,131 students (23,265 undergraduates and 5,331 graduates). Distance learning or online education comprise 23.7 of the total enrollment. That differentiation is important because those students were not included in Kimley-Horn s forecast and, ultimately, those students are not generating a demand for housing in Greenville. While there was a period of strong growth at ECU in early to mid-2000s, Attachment number 3 Page 9 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 10 of 26 growth has been far more modest since 2008. Approximately 80 of the ECU students live off-campus. ECU gave a lot of feedback that influenced Kimley-Horn s projections that growth will be similar in the next few years.

Tagged Passions:administrator, property, manager, education, policy, boards and commissions, services, development, distance learning, students, zoning, housing, enrollment, neighborhood, Development, growth, planning, and economic development

Ms. Rossi stated that PCC is technically not within the Greenville city limits, but it is very close. Kimley-Horn wanted to include PCC in its analysis because those students do generate a demand for student housing. PCC has a total enrollment of 22,022 students. 11,678 students are enrolled in curriculum programs and 10,344 students are enrolled in continuing education. As with any community college, PCC does not have any on-campus housing and the demand for student housing coming out of PCC is far more varied than ECU. PCC has a more diverse study body than ECU in terms of age, living situations, and income.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:education, university, students, curriculum, housing, enrollment, and program

Ms. Rossi reported that the data Kimley-Horn pulled for off-campus and market-rate housing is focused on larger, professionally-managed communities. Kimley-Horn back checked its third-party data source with findings from ECU. ECU inventories each of the larger student apartment communities on a monthly basis to see how many bedrooms are available and what types of bedrooms. Kimley-Horn rectified what was found from its third-party data sources with what was tracked by ECU to make sure that they were at least consistent.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing and market

Ms. Rossi stated that off-campus student apartments are generally measured by bedrooms. Kimley-Horn focused on 16 properties throughout the City of Greenville. These apartments are not exclusive to students anybody can technically rent at all of them, but they are very highly student-focused. 95 or greater are rented to students. Overall, the City of Greenville has over 11,000 bedrooms that target students off campus.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:grocery and students

Ms. Rossi stated that nearly one-third of them are located more than three miles away from the ECU campus. That is over 3,600 bedrooms. The largest period of growth coincided with the period of student growth. There was more than 7,000 bedrooms completed in the 2000s.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:growth

Ms. Rossi reported a few things that Kimley-Horn found interesting about off-campus student performance. The vacancy rate at those 16 communities is approximately 11.6 (nearly 1,300 available bedrooms) as of November 2017. The following graph shows the vacancy rate by distance from the ECU campus in 2017.

Attachment number 3 Page 10 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 11 of 26

Tagged Passions:performance

Ms. Rossi reported that the farther one gets away from ECU, the higher the vacancy rate. So, that 18.7 vacancy rate at greater than three miles is very heavily impacted by Paramount 3800 (formerly Captains Quarter) and The Bellamy. Both have fairly significant vacancies presently.

No additional detail provided

Ms. Rossi responded that the vacancy rate at The Bellamy is almost 30 and it is over 21 at the Paramount 3800. The Paramount 3800 went through a period of bankruptcy and has changed ownership, hence the name changed. Given the size of those communities, it equates to a significant concentration of the currently available housing stock. According to industry standards or benchmarks for what is considered as a healthy student apartments market that is more like 5 . Greenville in its current state is already more than double to what is considered to be a healthy market.

Attachment number 3 Page 11 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 12 of 26

Tagged Passions:housing and market

Ms. Rossi reported that opposite of vacancy rate where one moves away from the ECU campus, the vacancy rate increases. One would find that rents per bedroom decline and there is greater affordability in units.

No additional detail provided

Ms. Rossi gave information about market-rate apartments, stating that the data focuses on professionally-managed communities with more than 25 units and that does not include a single-family house that is being leased by an investor or by an owner. These units tend to be measured by the actual unit and target households, but that is not to say that students cannot rent them. Currently, there are almost 5,200 market-rate units in Greenville. 35 of them were completed between 1990 and 1999. The newest product is gravitating towards northwestern Greenville, capitalizing on proximity to Vidant for people wanting to be closer to jobs. But it is also gravitating towards the main commercial corridors for people wanting to be closer to retail services.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:commercial, services, grocery, corridor, leasing, students, market, and jobs

Ms. Rossi reported that the vacancy rate in market-rate apartments has significantly declined, particularly between 2011 and 2017, reaching 2.6 in the third-quarter of 2017. The industry standard for student communities is 5 and market-rate communities is at 6 or 7 , representing a market where someone could move in or out. Sentiments were highlighted by people at the stakeholders meeting that if one is trying to move to Greenville and wanting to lease a period of time before buying a house, it is challenging to find a quality unit that is well located and available. Kimley-Horn s data mimicked that.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:leasing and market

Ms. Rossi reported that the average lease rates have increased by 16.4 since 2011. That is consistent with the national matrix. Apartment rates are increasing and Greenville is no different.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:rates and leasing

Ms. Rossi reported that for apartment supply, Kimley-Horn looked at the future pipeline. Kimley-Horn wanted to know what is under construction and what was proposed. From a student targeted focus, there are 1,930 bedrooms currently under construction in Greenville and another 656 bedrooms are proposed. In terms of market-rate product, 281 units are under construction and 508 units are proposed. For at least what is under construction, students activity is closely concentrated around ECU. The market-rate has a tendency to be focused in southern Greenville, but is sort of capitalizing on main corridors that have retail services.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services, corridor, students, construction, and market

Ms. Rossi gave information about the apartment demand in Greenville. ECU has a 2015 Enrollment Management Report, which is how they foresaw the University growing in the short-term to mid-term and how they were going to manage that growth in terms of services needed to be provided for students. These forecasts can be impacted by a variety of factors, including State funding. It is not something that the University necessarily has the greatest control over and there certainly is room for movement or modifications. What Kimley-Horn came up with is what was heard from ECU and ultimately showing that enrollment could increase by nearly 4,000 students through 2027.

Attachment number 3 Page 12 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 13 of 26

Tagged Passions:services, university, students, funding, enrollment, and growth

Ms. Rosie reported that there was more limited information about PCC s projections. Community colleges tend to be more reactive to economic cycles. When times are good and people have jobs, community colleges slow significantly. When times are bad and there is an economic recession, they tend to get a bump in enrollment. Kimley-Horn looked at PCC s trends over a longer period of time as well as the conversations with PCC. Kimley- Horn estimated that PCC s full-time curriculum students are most likely to generate local demand for the apartment product and could increase by 700 students over the next 10 years.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:education, university, students, curriculum, enrollment, and jobs

Ms. Rossi reported that when considering the net of the demand numbers, Kimley-Horn excluded those who are doing distance learning education. Kimley-Horn also excluded the ECU freshmen because they typically live on campus and focused on the upper class students who are driving a demand for off-campus housing. The demand for professionally managed communities was considered versus alternatives such as The Grid or single- family households or those wanting to live in a market-rate community. Ultimately, Kimley-Horn found the 10-year demand for off-campus housing is about 1,600 bedrooms. The majority of the demand is expected to come from ECU.

Ms. Rossi explained the market-rate supply, which is mostly under construction, and demand reconciliation part of the analysis. If Greenville wanted its student apartment market to come down closer to the healthy 5 vacancy rate, there are about 720 bedrooms that need to be absorbed. Plus the new supply that is forecasted to come in the next two years does exceed the demand that Kimley-Horn projected.

Tagged Passions:education, distance learning, students, housing, construction, and market

Ms. Rossi stated that the market-rate product was based on the housing forecast for Greenville. Based on the State of North Carolina forecast and a few other third-party forecasts, Kimley-Horn projected that the City of Greenville could reach about 47,772 households by 2027, which is an increase of 8,852 or 22.7 . A market-rate rental share was applied so the current renter household share in Greenville is about 63 . Kimley- Horn reduced that number to 20 because they wanted to exclude the students that were counted in the student demand. But, Kimley-Horn also wanted to dive down into the renters who were over the age of 24 and earn 25,000 or greater annually, which is about 20 . If you take the 20 of the 10-year household growth that comes out to be demand for a market-rate rental product at just under 1,800 units.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:rental, students, housing, growth, and market

Ms. Rossi stated that considering the supply forecast, there was 789 units in the current pipeline, which is less than half of the forecasted demand. Ultimately, the analysis came down to an excess supply of student housing, but a potential for additional market-rate housing.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing and market

Ms. Rossi summarized Kimley-Horn s analysis conclusion, stating that proximity really does seem to play a huge role as it relates to student housing. Occupancy is higher. The closer to ECU campus, a lot of the new product that is currently under construction is within a mile of the ECU campus and consideration should be taken on how that might impact other communities that are already struggling. Communities further from campus have been

Attachment number 3 Page 13 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 14 of 26 adjusting their pricing to stay competitive and that is creating a wide variety of price points for students. Although there are some nonstudents who live at the existing off-campus communities, the design of student targeted communities does limit the target market. So, retrofitting a four-bedroom, four-bathroom unit to rent for a family household is fairly challenging. As an additional supply comes on, some communities may become obsolete. The newer market-rate product has generally gravitated towards job centers as well as retail and service corridors. Nationally and across most of large municipalities in North Carolina, Kimley-Horn is seeing gravitation towards the urban core and that has not happened in Greenville yet.

Tagged Passions:corridor, students, housing, construction, and market

Council Member Meyerhoeffer stated that in the analysis, there was a brief mention of The Grid. Kimley-Horn relied upon reports from local residents, indicating that over 80 of the area is occupied by renters. Council Member Meyerhoeffer asked how does The Grid come into play in Kimley-Horn s analysis, if at all, in terms of the number of student rentals there, what is available, and how that is going to impact the City moving forward from a student housing prospective.

Ms. Rossi responded that The Grid came into play. Given the location and proximity as well as the affordability and the popularity of that area, Kimley-Horn does not anticipate that particular neighborhood to change significantly. As Kimley-Horn was forecasting out net new demand over the next two years, The Grid was held constant and that coincided fairly well with what was heard from people.

Tagged Passions:council, rental, housing, and neighborhood

Ms. Rossi responded that one interesting thing is that the renter occupancy share within The Grid is high, about 80 , but there has been a little bit of softening. The housing units were passed down from one friend to another whereas now at the beginning of a school year, there is a little bit more marketing of some of the units. So as more choices become available, offering at least a similar level of proximity, The Grid still seems to be doing very well from at least an occupancy standpoint. There are not a lot of vacancies and it does still seem to be very consistent in terms of who lives there. Some of the management companies that are covering a number of those units are doing a little more work of marketing the units than they used to.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:education, housing, and market

Ms. Rossi stated that the 21 or more vacancy rate quoted for the Paramount 3800 is only based on units that are technically online and some more of them may be online next year.

No additional detail provided

Ms. Rossi stated that is correct.

Attachment number 3 Page 14 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 15 of 26

Ms. Rossi responded that if those two are pulled out, the City may be slightly above average, but still within a healthy range.

No additional detail provided

Council Member Litchfield stated that based on the data shown tonight and in the analysis, everything points towards proximity to the University area. He asked if Kimley-Horn feels that people will start gravitating back out beyond the three-mile area to fill those properties.

Ms. Rossi responded that cost is going to be a consideration in terms of how dispersion of students occurs across Greenville with some of the further outlined communities being a little bit more aggressive with concessions that they are offering to attract students. That may be a flat screen television or a few months of free rent. It appeals to quite a range of students budgets. So there is value in some of those outlying communities in that they offer some affordability for students.

Tagged Passions:budget, council, university, and students

Ms. Rossi stated that when Kimley-Horn worked with the ECU Student Government Association and hosted a small forum. A keypad polling exercise was done with the students and Kimley-Horn found that the majority of the students, who were polled, was comfortable with a rent range between 500 and 750 per month. Some of the closer end, especially the newer product which is under construction, is expected to be higher and would be attractive and they are competitive.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:students, construction, and election

Ms. Rossi responded that the supply number includes four properties that are under construction and one property that is proposed.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:property and construction

Ms. Rossi responded that there is demand for additional market-rate housing beyond what is in the current pipeline today. Based on a 10-year forecast period with possible growth and looking at age and income of how Greenville could and expected to grow in the future, there is additional demand for market-rate housing in the current pipeline.

Attachment number 3 Page 15 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 16 of 26

Tagged Passions:housing, growth, and market

Ms. Rossi responded that it could if there were parcels that are converting to student from market-rate sites.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:property, sites, and market

Council Member Smith stated that there is more money in student housing and that is what most people are wanting to build instead of market-rate housing. One to four students can live in one apartment and more money could be made. With that being the case, the concern of many in the community is the City is under demand on market-rate housing.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council, students, housing, and market

Council Member Smith stated that the City wants to build a walkable, bikeable community, people want to be in the center core, and the City is wanting to attract people to uptown Greenville. If the City of Greenville continues to allow just student housing so that people can make money and is not considering the other people who live in the community, the City will be put in a tough situation. The City might be okay now, but, if the City continues to allow student housing within the core area, then the City will be low on any chance of having market-rate housing that is going to be close enough to the uptown area.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council, housing, and market

Ms. Rossi stated that she would fully expect the vacancy rate of student housing to go up in the next two years beyond where it is today. It may not be specifically at the new communities. It may be at some of older communities that have experienced some higher vacancy rates, but the vacancy rate is expected to go up because so many units are coming out over the next two years.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:rates and housing

Ms. Rossi stated that from a market rate prospective, there is some level of balance. Something for the City Council to consider is the uptown area has gained some momentum and has some great restaurants and full night life opportunities. But, if the uptown becomes just an extension of the ECU campus, it will become a little bit more challenging to be attractive for a market-rate developer. Compared to some other communities, rent prices in Greenville are low, but Kimley-Horn is seeing that shift. There has been about 16.5 growth. Greenville is reaching a threshold where it will start to hit rents that performance can support from market-rate housing.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:restaurants, council, housing, performance, growth, and market

Council Member Smith stated that the City must consider its 63 rental rate and market- rate housing in order to attract young professionals. Council Member Smith asked whether Kimley-Horn has any recommendation for the City to continue to allow student housing to be built or should there be a moratorium for at least three years because of the growth.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council, rental, housing, growth, and market

Ms. Rossi responded that the City as a whole needs to weigh and consider how deeply does the City want to wade into the market in controlling or being a player and controlling the market. Personally, she feels that the vacancy rates as these next 1,932 bedrooms come online over the next two years will deter investors in a short term. There will be a short term relief regardless of a moratorium because of the number of bedrooms coming online

Attachment number 3 Page 16 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 17 of 26 over the next two years. Investors will consider the new supply as a potential challenge in a short term.

Tagged Passions:rates and market

Council Member Smiley stated that over the next 10 years, Kimley-Horn is projecting 1,600 bedrooms as new demand, but nearly twice that of new supply. Council Member Smiley asked if this envisions that the additional mothballed units will come online as well as construction and rehab of existing sites.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council, sites, and construction

Ms. Rossi responded yes.

No additional detail provided

Council Member Smiley stated that 720 at the bottom is the current excess vacancy. The 2,586 is the new construction intended.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council and construction

Ms. Rossi stated that is correct.

No additional detail provided

Council Member Smiley stated that it seems that a lot of the excess vacancies are away from the ECU campus but a good bit of the forecasted new supply is close. In the absence of the price advantage sounds like a recipe for it getting worse at the three-mile mark.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:council

Ms. Rossi stated that it could especially because a lot of those communities that are beyond three miles are older and may be becoming obsolete in their product offerings. Kimley- Horn found that across aboard like most of the communities offered at least a somewhat

Attachment number 3 Page 17 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 18 of 26 consistent level of amenities that students would expect today. The new forecasted supply does include the 656 bedrooms of the retreat, which is the Charles Boulevard site. That is to be determined if it is built, but Kimley-Horn wanted to provide a conservative estimate so it was included. Obviously, it would bring the forecasted new supply number down quite a bit and bring those numbers more inline.

Tagged Passions:streets and students

Chief Planner Weitnauer responded that this was a great investment of doing this study. The City Council could have discussion and give staff direction to give recommendations. Staff took direction from the City Council on May 8, 2017. Moratorium was discussed when former City Attorney David Holec was with the City, and he said that moratorium is not allowed for residential. The City could not do a moratorium for a few years to let the market settle down, but the City Council could take private dormitories off the book since they are an allowed use. The City Council could set where student housing is wanted and decide how much the City would want to control the market.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:legal, council, investment, housing, and market

Chief Planner Weitnauer stated that one qualitative thing done by Kimley-Horn was to get a sense from the community. There is a section in the analysis that can be reviewed by the City Council or Ms. Rossi could provide a summary about people wanting more student housing, students downtown and what are the pros and cons. It is the City Council s role and the Community Development Department s role to work with the City Council on how to take this information and come up with some policy and land use revisions or the City Council could let the market do what was suggested by Kimley-Horn.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:policy, council, downtown, development, students, housing, Development, community development, and market

Chief Planner Weitnauer stated that the trend is that the developers are at the frontend for a couple of years that it is lucrative to build, hold on to it for a couple of years, and then sell it. Everything was going up, but it was so attractive and they all wanted to be part of it.

No additional detail provided

Chief Planner Weitnauer suggested that the City Council should take a look at the video of the May 8, 2017 City Council meeting. It was at that meeting that the City Council recommended to have the study prepared.

No additional detail provided

Ms. Rossi responded that it varies and is challenging, especially as one hits those larger floor plans. Some of the communities that have a little bit more of a mixture of bedroom

Attachment number 3 Page 18 of 26 Proposed Minutes: Greenville City Council Meeting Monday, January 8, 2018 Page 19 of 26

type may find more success in that conversion. She has researched that it is not necessarily the market rate demand that really starts to function. A lot of times it will convert to attract more of an affordable or low-income household because it is not the ideal unit. They are making some tradeoffs of what one might desire in terms of a space for a household for the rooftop itself. That is not in every case.

Tagged Passions:poverty and market

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