AZ - Phoenix: Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

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Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

Agenda Meeting Location:Phoenix City Hall 200 W. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85003

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

First Floor Assembly Rooms A, B9:00 AMWednesday, February 14, 2018

CALL TO ORDER

CALL TO THE PUBLIC

MINUTES OF MEETINGS

1
For Approval or Correction, the Minutes of the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Meeting on January 10, 2018.

CONSENT ACTION (ITEMS 2-5)
Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

2
Request to Apply for and Accept 2017 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG)

This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval to enter into an agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program to accept grant funds in the amount of 36,263. The funds, if awarded, will be used to purchase 1,200 Name Panels for firefighter turnout jackets. A 15 match (in the amount of 5,439) is required from the City of Phoenix. THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION.
Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, purchasing, council, program, funding, fire departments and districts, emergency, and grant

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and

Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

City of Phoenix Printed on 2/8/2018 1

February 14, 2018Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Agenda the Fire Department.
Tagged Passions:veterans and fire departments and districts

3
Authorization to Enter into an Agreement with the Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board for Reimbursement of Basic Training Costs

This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval for the Police Department to enter into an agreement with the Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board (AZPOST) to accept funds for the reimbursement of basic training costs in an amount not to exceed 200,000. THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION
Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, council, training, and funding

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Police Department.

Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, and manager

4
Authorization to Apply for, Accept, and Enter Into Agreements for the 2019 Governor's Office of Highway Safety Grants

This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval to apply for, accept and enter into grant contracts for Fiscal Year 2019 funding administered by the Arizona Governor's Office of Highway Safety (GOHS), which includes funding from the DUI Abatement Council. THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION.

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, contract, council, abatement, funding, and grant

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr., the Prosecutor's Office, and the Street Transportation, Fire, and Police Departments.

Tagged Passions:administrator, streets, public safety, manager, and transportation

City of Phoenix Printed on 2/8/2018 2

February 14, 2018Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Agenda
Tagged Passions:veterans

5
Authorization to Apply for, Accept, and Enter into Agreements for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Grant Funds

This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend approval to City Council for the Police Department to enter into various agreements with the Office of National Drug Control Policy and the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office for up to 2,500,000.00 in funding through the 2018-2019 High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA). THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, policy, council, drugs, funding, and grant

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Police Department.

INFORMATION ONLY (ITEMS 6-7)
Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, and manager

6
Fire Department Hiring

This report responds to a request from the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee for information on the estimated costs and resources that would be required if the City staffed the Phoenix Fire Department at a ratio of 1.0 first responder firefighters per 1,000 residents. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, and fire departments and districts

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Fire and Budget and Research departments.

Tagged Passions:budget, administrator, and manager

7
Intergovernmental Agreement for a Communications Systems City of Phoenix Printed on 2/8/2018

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:Communications, intergovernmental, and communications

3
February 14, 2018Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

Agenda Strategic Alliance This report provides information to the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee regarding an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between the City of Phoenix on behalf of the Regional Wireless Cooperative (RWC) and the City of Mesa on behalf of the Topaz Regional Wireless Cooperative (TRWC), to collaborate concerning delivery of public safety communications services to their respective users when such collaboration benefits at least one of the parties participating in a particular cooperative effort. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY.
Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, services, wireless, Communications, intergovernmental, Wireless, strategic, and communications

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Deputy City Manager Karen Peters, Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr., and the Office of Government Relations.

INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION (ITEMS 8-9)
Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

8
Mountain Rescues Update - 2017

This report provides an update to the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee on Phoenix Fire and Police departments' mountain rescue efforts during calendar year 2017. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION.

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Fire and Police departments.

Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, and manager

City of Phoenix Printed on 2/8/2018 4

February 14, 2018Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Agenda
Tagged Passions:veterans

9
Departments Budget Update

This verbal report provides an update to the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee on the budget status for Police, Fire and the Municipal Court. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE ACTION (ITEMS 10)
Tagged Passions:veterans, legal, budget, public safety, and court

10
Police Body-Worn Cameras Request for Proposals

This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for Police body-worn cameras. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION, DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE ACTION.

Tagged Passions:veterans, RFP, rfp, public safety, and council

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Police, Finance and ITS Departments.

Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, manager, and finance

CALL TO THE PUBLIC

FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS ADJOURN

City of Phoenix Printed on 2/8/2018 5

February 14, 2018Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Agenda For further information or reasonable accommodations, please call Corey Williams, Management Assistant II, City Manager's Office at 602-261-8875. 7-11 Friendly.
Tagged Passions:veterans, administrator, and manager

Persons paid to lobby on behalf of persons or organizations other than themselves must register with the City Clerk prior to lobbying or within five business days thereafter, and must register annually to continue lobbying. If you have any questions about registration or whether or not you must register, please contact the City Clerk's Office at 602-262-6811.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:lobbying and business

Members: Councilman Michael Nowakowski, Chair

Vice Mayor Laura Pastor Councilwoman Thelda Williams

City of Phoenix Printed on 2/8/2018 6

Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 1

Tagged Passions:council

For Approval or Correction, the Minutes of the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Meeting on January 10, 2018.

Summary This item transmits the minutes of the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Meeting on January 10, 2018. The minutes are attached.

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

7
Phoenix City Council Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

Summary Minutes Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, and council

City Council Subcommittee Room Phoenix City Hall, Assembly Rooms A, B and C 200 W. Washington St. Phoenix, Ariz.

Subcommittee Members Present Subcommittee Members Absent Councilman Michael Nowakowski, Chair None Vice Mayor Laura Pastor Councilwoman Thelda Williams

Tagged Passions:council

Call to Order Chairman Nowakowski called the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee meeting to order at 9:07 a.m. with Vice Mayor Pastor and Councilwoman Williams present.

Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney announced the appointment of Assistant Police Chief Louie Tovar responsible for the community and strategic services division.
Tagged Passions:veterans, administrator, public safety, manager, services, appointments, and strategic

Call to the Public None.

1.
For Approval or Correction, the Minutes of the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee Meeting on November 8, 2017 and December 13, 2017. Councilwoman Williams made a motion to approve the minutes from the November 8, 2017 and December 13, 2017 Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee meetings. Vice Mayor Pastor seconded the motion, which passed unanimously, 3:0.

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

2.
Authorization to Enter into Agreements with the United States Department of Agriculture to Accept Reimbursement for Police Services Councilwoman Williams made a motion to approve the item. Vice Mayor Pastor seconded the motion, which passed unanimously, 3:0.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:public safety, services, and agriculture

3.
Update on Nextdoor Assistant Police Chief Louis Tovar introduced the item and fellow presenter Sergeant Vincent Lewis from the Public Affairs Division.

Sergeant Lewis stated the Phoenix Police Department began their involvement with Next Door in 2014. He explained the private social network was designed for groups of people within geographic ranges to share information on topics affecting them or their community such as items for sale, yard sales, community events, and public safety. He stated the Phoenix Police Department had a Public Safety account with one-way messaging able to

Tagged Passions:public safety, sale, and events

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address residents and communicate information. He stated conversations between neighbors were private and unable to be seen by the department unless tagged or invited.

Chairman Nowakowski asked how Councilmembers could access or pass information through Nextdoor. Sergeant Lewis stated information could be passed through the Police department using their one-way messaging to distribute information to Nextdoor members. Sergeant Lewis explained that Nextdoor members are grouped into a specific geographic region that is part of the resident s neighborhood.
Tagged Passions:public safety and neighborhood

Vice Mayor Pastor expressed desire for Councilmembers to have access to both their personal geographic area and to neighborhoods within their District. She asked who was responsible for the information on the City side knowing conversations were taking place and if misinformation was spreading. Sergeant Lewis explained unless issues were brought to them, they were not aware of them and added how Nextdoor was not designed to be a repository for Police to monitor conversations.

Tagged Passions:public safety and neighborhood

Vice Mayor Pastor asked about the department s ability to share information with residents on City related topics. Sergeant Lewis stated they were relying on Community Action Officers to help in those efforts. He added the Public Affairs Bureau also monitored various social media accounts to dispel misinformation and give community education.

Tagged Passions:education, poverty, and social media law

Chairman Nowakowski stated he believed there was confusion on the purpose of Nextdoor which was a grass roots approach to policing neighborhoods similar to community policing. He stated more education efforts needed to be made so residents understood if they wanted the City involved they would need to tag the department.

Tagged Passions:education and neighborhood

Vice Mayor Pastor agreed and asked what the purpose of Nextdoor was from the Police department s perspective. Sergeant Lewis stated the intent was to a variety of public safety information to individuals who use Nextdoor. Chairman Nowakowski stated it was somewhat like block watch on cyberspace. He emphasized the need to educate people on Nextdoor being a community-based site the City does not maintain or control.

Assistant Chief Tovar spoke about the creative ways the department was using Nextdoor and stated they were still learning how to maximize their communication efforts. He agreed there was an opportunity to raise awareness on how to use Nextdoor effectively which could potentially be done through the Community Action Officers in each precinct.

Tagged Passions:public safety and poverty

Vice Mayor Pastor stated her understanding was the department purchased Nextdoor for marketing to get information to the community. Sergeant Lewis clarified they did not pay any money to use Nextdoor. Assistant Chief Tovar explained they established a free public safety account in order to use Nextdoor as a means to communicate. Chairman Nowakowski suggested someone from Nextdoor come to a future meeting to explain more about what Nextdoor was and how they could educate those using it.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:public safety, purchasing, and market

Councilwoman Williams asked about the communication process on Nextdoor for when the City started a new program, such as Phoenix C.A.R.E.S. Sergeant Lewis stated they

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:program

9
would typically craft a media release using certain language and also use other social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to communicate further.

Vice Mayor Pastor discussed a chat of an incident on 19th Avenue and Osborn asking how she should respond. Sergeant Lewis stated the information should be brought to the Police department s attention so it could be addressed.
Tagged Passions:public safety and social media law

4.
Light Rail Safety and Security Update Mario Paniagua introduced the item and Director of High Capacity Transit Albert Santana, Assistant Police Chief Sandra Renteria and Police Commander Brad Burt.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:public safety, security, and transportation

Mr. Santana spoke about the City s initial expansion and investment in public transit through Transit 2000. He stated as services were expanded it was recognized safety and security were critical for the success of the system. He discussed the initiation and expansion of the Transit Enforcement Unit (TEU) created to provide enforcement on public transit. He spoke about the Safety and Security budget for fiscal year 2017-18 which totaled 15 million between TEU, Contract Security, and Valley Metro Rail. He highlighted examples of specialized programs including the TEU Crime Suppression Squad pilot program and the 19th Avenue Corridor Extra Duty program. He discussed the Valley Metro partnership and introduced Adrian Ruiz, Director of Safety and Security at Valley Metro and recognized their efforts alongside the Police department to maintain the safety and security in the light rail. He stated Ms. Ruiz s team worked with the private security company Allied Universal going over the various staffing and services provided to service passengers as well as additional enhancements to ensure adequate service from staff including trainings, videos and various meetings.

Mr. Santana discussed the Transit Homeless Outreach team developed as part of the Community Bridges, Inc. team. He stated the outreach team includes two staff members working 40 hours a week with flexible hours so they could be deployed as needed when situations arose. He commented on the certified, trained professionals able to engage with individuals and connect them with services. He stated the funding required of the program was 125,000 annually which they were able to pay for with savings they gained in modifications of their private security contracts. He spoke about the high level coordination required between Valley Metro, the Police department and the Homeless Outreach team that made the services possible.

Tagged Passions:budget, public safety, recognition, human resources, services, contract, Public Transit, expansion, corridor, investment, training, homeless, security, program, funding, transportation, and crime

Vice Mayor Pastor asked about the funding source of the 9.5 million dedicated to TEU. Mr. Paniagua stated the funds were coming out of Transportation 2050. He explained how when TEU was established it fell under Transportation 2000 but is now fully funded by Transportation 2050. He stated an additional 2 million per year was added to address security needs. Vice Mayor Pastor asked for a breakdown of the funding. Mr. Paniagua stated he would provide her the information.

Councilwoman Williams spoke about confusion on who provides security on the light rail as well as the changing dynamics of the security pertaining to ridership rules and enforcement. Ms. Ruiz discussed the Respect the Ride program stating fair inspectors had
Tagged Passions:security, program, funding, and transportation

10
permission to write civil citations. Councilwoman Williams spoke about the coordinated efforts between police departments to monitor and secure platform stations.

Tagged Passions:public safety

Councilman Nowakowski stated he had concerns with the light rail honor system feeling people were taking advantage of it. He brought up other cities who had checkpoint systems in place and wanted to see Phoenix adopt something similar. He discussed the Respect the Ride campaign and concerns he had heard from residents of specific populations being targeted because of their appearance. He stated there needed to be education done to bring awareness that the program was about behavior on the light rail and being respectful to one another, not about the part of town a person lives in or what they look like. He suggested reaching out to block watch groups and community neighborhood associations.

Councilwoman Williams stated the light rail ticketing system was very old and as part of updating them there needed to be a ticket reading system. She agreed with the public campaign suggested by Councilman Nowakowski.
Tagged Passions:education, neighborhood, program, transportation, and behavior

Vice Mayor Pastor stated one of the responsibilities of the City was to understand the dynamics and diversity of neighborhoods. She asked if there was any thought on the cultural and socioeconomic impact when the code was created. She gave an example of the displacement of transient/homeless passengers into neighborhoods when kicked off for violating the code of conduct. Ms. Ruiz confirmed. She explained the code of conduct was about behavior not demographic or socioeconomic circumstances. She stated Valley Metro was not a homeless shelter provider but they worked closely with cities and Community Bridges. She stated all the security personnel carried a 2-1-1 card and had information on shelters and cabs. She said the idea when the training was conducted for the code of conduct was not to leave anyone stranded who is need, either medically or for safety reasons. Vice Mayor Pastor suggested there be a campaign to educate the community as she felt most people did not perceive the code of conduct the way Ms. Ruiz explained it. She spoke about the importance of understanding mental health as well as encouraging citizen involvement when crafting codes of conduct.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:personnel, Public Transit, mental health, diversity, training, health, homeless, neighborhood, security, and behavior

Councilwoman Williams stated she was on the board that helped develop and approve the code of conduct and explained the process. She spoke about some limitations and challenges as well as the staff involvement in delivering information and giving presentations. She spoke about the importance of education and suggesting expanded outreach be done in schools that rely on buses.

Chairman Nowakowski discussed the increased prices of the light rail and the need for an education campaign to inform on the code of conduct and how it impacts the community.
Tagged Passions:education, Public Transit, and transportation

Leonard Clark stated he understood safety was important but highlighted some concerns. He spoke about the importance of treating the homeless population fairly and felt the code of conduct could be a veiled effort to target them.

Tagged Passions:grocery and homeless

11
Chairman Nowakowski asked if any ordinances were being quoted or if it was just a behavioral matter. Ms. Ruiz spoke about the process and stated the complete code of conduct was available online. She stated the basis of the code was every passenger on the light rail deserving a safe ride and good experience. She emphasized the code of conduct was not about discrimination and spoke about the training the team went through.

Chairman Nowakowski reemphasized the importance of community education and outreach, beyond posting the code online as not all people had access to the internet. He stated work needed to be done on engaging the public and Council. He discussed the Phoenix C.A.R.E.S. program being a step in the right direction in helping combat the issue of homelessness. Councilwoman Williams asked for Mr. Santana to work with Ms. Ruiz to provide a monthly incident report to the subcommittee also including statistics from the Police department and any related contractors. She stated she would also like him to assist in crafting a public awareness plan. Mr. Santana agreed.

Tagged Passions:public safety, education, ordinance, council, discrimination, training, program, and transportation

Vice Mayor Pastor asked for a biweekly report with updates on occurrences throughout the light rail. She stated every Councilmember should have access to the report as it impacted every District.

Chairman Nowakowski asked to see information on incidents in areas surrounding the light rail to understand the impact and see if there is any increase in violence or crime. He stated as a future agenda item it would be good to see the overall impact on the surrounding communities and Police department including extra calls and staff resources.
Tagged Passions:public safety, transportation, and crime

5.
Unmanned Aerial Systems DRONES Director of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Lisa Jones presented the item. She stated a workgroup was formed to discuss the challenges and preparation that would need to be addressed in order to approach drone usage from a City level. She highlighted some examples, specifically commenting on the Water Services department and the potential to use drones in monitoring wetlands.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:drone, services, Utility, Immigration, security, utility, emergency, and water

Councilwoman Williams asked how the Water Services department currently monitors wetlands. Assistant Water Services Director Dennis Porter stated it was mostly done manually. He stated aerials could be flown regularly but were very expensive compared to drones which were inexpensive. Councilwoman Williams asked if the department used boats. Mr. Porter confirmed stating they monitored different vegetation types although with a drone it would be a more efficient process.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:drone, services, Utility, boating, utility, and water

Vice Mayor Pastor asked if drone usage would decrease staff time needed. Mr. Porter stated there would likely still be the same amount of staff but it would be a less expensive operation. Ms. Jones added the application of drones would complement the resources currently in place and expand in ways that were not currently possible.

Tagged Passions:drone

12
Ms. Jones continued discussing use cases specifically pointing out usage of aerial videography during storms or in cases of lost or missing persons. She discussed some challenges including public perception and safety issues. She then introduced Deputy Fire Chief Scott Grane who would go over Fire department use cases.

Chief Grane discussed use cases from an operational support standpoint. He highlighted how drones could be beneficial in fighting fires from a strategic level providing good oversight for the command team. He discussed technical rescue incidents with drones able to provide situational awareness as well as quick payloads. He spoke about drone usage in hazardous material incidents reducing the level of risk and exposure as well as in mitigation and stabilization efforts. He discussed how drones could provide tactical advantages in mass casualty incidents, more efficient and safe responses in unplanned events and greater security in special major planned events.

Tagged Passions:drone, risk, strategic, security, events, and fire departments and districts

Vice Mayor Pastor asked if the City was currently using drones on mountain rescues. Chief Grane stated no, however technical teams from Scottsdale and Mesa Fire departments were currently using drones.

Police Commander James Burgett introduced Commander Grady Carlson and Sergeant Blake Carlson. Commander Brady Carlson discussed how drones could assist in police operations. He spoke about drone use in crime scene management through aerial searches of crime scenes, enhancing accuracy in GPS mapping, and being an aerial platform for scene photography. He discussed major events indicating how drones could help in preplanning phases and ensuring adequate resources are deployed appropriately.
Tagged Passions:drone, public safety, events, fire departments and districts, and crime

Sergeant Blake Carlson discussed the Phoenix police department s drone enforcement policy which was adopted in November 2017 and based on Arizona State law. He stated the goal was to protect the safety of the public and the critical infrastructure of the city. He explained that a focus area would be on education efforts, especially with drone hobbyists. He stated they would partner with the commercial drone use community to anticipate and understand flight areas.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:drone, commercial, public safety, education, and policy

Vice Mayor Pastor asked about hobbyists and flight regulations. Commander Carlson stated the Arizona State law was based on FAA regulations. He stated if a drone was under violation of FAA regulation it would become a criminal violation. Vice Mayor Pastor asked how residents would be aware if they were in violation. Assistant City Attorney Dan Brown stated the federal law defined a hobbyist as a part time user not being paid by others. He said there was still much back and forth occurring at the Federal level about rules related to recreational use. He stated there were specific rules such as not flying near an airport as well as rules specific to the City of Phoenix which he could follow up on. Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney added there were organized groups of highly skilled users which the department would need to consider in the future.

Tagged Passions:drone, legal, administrator, manager, recreation, airport, and regulation

Vice Mayor Pastor discussed the City adopting certain rules and noted the State s involvement. Mr. Brown stated the City had initially started a process to regulate drones and during that time the State legislature enacted state law, found in the criminal code. He

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:drone

13
stated there were four main takeaways in the statute in how the State preempts the City except in four areas: 1) where already authorized by the FAA, 2) the City can decide how to operate and use drones it owns, 3) the City can regulate takeoff and landing of drones, and 4) does not apply to first responders. Mr. Dohoney added the company Amazon had expressed interest in delivering packages by drone. He stated it was not yet perfected but was anticipated to happen and would be something they would need to consider.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:drone and internet retailers

Councilwoman Williams asked if the internal policies on each department s use of drones would be brought to Council through the subcommittee. She asked about the differences between different drone user groups such as professional groups and amateurs. Mr. Dohoney stated work was being done on coordinating the departments and some departments were further along than others. He said they were still identifying all the uses for drones and which departments may benefit from them.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:drone and council

Councilwoman Williams asked about storage and costs associated with drone video capturing of crime scenes. Ms. Jones stated unmanned aerial systems included the entire system with staffing, training, governance, policies and procedures, and equipment included. She stated different types of drones would be needed for different use cases. She added the important factor was relevance and understanding each department would have their own business case for drone usage as well as standard operating procedures.

Tagged Passions:drone, human resources, training, equipment, procedure, crime, and business

Vice Mayor Pastor spoke about the coordinated efforts and the risk management team taking the lead. She stated the subcommittee was asking for the department efforts to continue working collaboratively..

Councilman Nowakowski asked for information on resident usage indicating children and families may be unaware of policies. Ms. Jones stated the Civil Aviation Authority had made a distinction between recreational and commercial drones. She spoke about individuals needing to register their drones and there being a line of sight restriction with limitations on how high a drone should be flown. Sergeant Carlson added there was information on the FAA website as well as other online resources that outlined quick guidelines on drone regulations and usage.
Tagged Passions:drone, commercial, risk, recreation, and regulation

Vice Mayor Pastor stated she did not feel the public understood having to register drones or other regulations that go along with purchasing a drone. Ms. Jones stated they could provide her with a one-page fact sheet with information. Commander Burgett added the Police department was not looking to make arrests and the focus was more on an overall educational effort for the community. He stated in aggravated circumstances they would take action but in general the goal was to educate.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:drone, public safety, purchasing, and regulation

Leonard Clark stated he liked the idea of regulating the drones and voiced concerns with drones impacting the privacy of citizens.

Councilman Nowakowski left the meeting at 10:54 a.m.
Tagged Passions:drone and privacy

14
6. Mountain Rescues Update - 2017 The item was continued to the following meeting.

No additional detail provided

Call to the Public Leonard Clark expressed concern for the delays in getting police body cameras. He asked for the delays to stop and spoke about needing to build trust between the police and the community. He also discussed the City needing a Civilian Oversight board.

Tagged Passions:public safety and surveillance

Future Agenda Items Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney stated the mountain rescue item had been continued. He stated there would be a Fire department hiring update, a Phoenix C.A.R.E.S. Citywide homeless enactment response strategy presentation, an overview of the RWC radio system and a public safety department budget review in February. He stated the Nextdoor item requested may not make it to the February agenda but would be coming to them in the near future.

Adjournment Vice Mayor Pastor adjourned the meeting at 10:59 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Sarah Moratto Management Intern
Tagged Passions:budget, administrator, public safety, manager, radio, strategic, homeless, and fire departments and districts

15
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 2 Request to Apply for and Accept 2017 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval to enter into an agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program to accept grant funds in the amount of 36,263. The funds, if awarded, will be used to purchase 1,200 Name Panels for firefighter turnout jackets. A 15 match (in the amount of 5,439) is required from the City of Phoenix. THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION. Summary The purpose of the AFG Grant Program is to enhance the safety of the public and firefighters with respect to fire-related hazards by providing direct financial assistance to fire departments. Name Panels are constructed from the same fire-resistant materials that are used in firefighter turnout jackets. Each firefighter will receive a Name Panel with their name displayed in large, reflective lettering and subsequently attached to the tail of their turnout jacket. Name Panels provide a means for better recognizing individual firefighters who are operating in heavy smoke conditions at a structure fire. The reflective properties enhance fireground accountability and ultimately improve firefighter safety. Procurement The Fire Department will administer the grant in accordance with Administrative Regulation 3.10.

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, purchasing, recognition, council, accountability, program, finance, regulation, materials, funding, fire departments and districts, emergency, and grant

Contract Term The grant, if awarded, is projected to begin on March 1, 2018 and end on February 28, 2019.

Tagged Passions:contract and grant

Financial Impact If awarded, the City of Phoenix Fire Department will receive 36,263 in federal funding. A 15-percent cost share is required in the amount of 5,439 that will be covered by the Fire Department's operating budget.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:budget, finance, funding, and fire departments and districts

16
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 2

No additional detail provided

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Fire Department.

Tagged Passions:administrator, manager, and fire departments and districts

17
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 3 Authorization to Enter into an Agreement with the Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board for Reimbursement of Basic Training Costs This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval for the Police Department to enter into an agreement with the Arizona Peace Officer Standards and Training Board (AZPOST) to accept funds for the reimbursement of basic training costs in an amount not to exceed 200,000. THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION Summary The purpose of this agreement is to provide continuity of basic training during the transition from the former Arizona Law Enforcement Academy (ALEA) to other, yet to be determined agreements throughout the state.

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, council, training, and funding

Contract Term This agreement is effective when ratified by all signatories, and terminates on June 30, 2018 at which time all unspent or unencumbered funds must be returned to the Police Officer Training Fund.

Tagged Passions:public safety, contract, training, and funding

Financial Impact AZPOST shall allocate 75,000 for equipment, capital improvement and other expenditures and 125,000 to the Phoenix Police Department to reimburse the cost of training police recruits at the training academy.

Tagged Passions:capital spending, public safety, Capital Spending, training, equipment, and finance

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Police Department.

Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, and manager

18
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 4 Authorization to Apply for, Accept, and Enter Into Agreements for the 2019 Governor's Office of Highway Safety Grants This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval to apply for, accept and enter into grant contracts for Fiscal Year 2019 funding administered by the Arizona Governor's Office of Highway Safety (GOHS), which includes funding from the DUI Abatement Council. THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION. Summary GOHS announced the availability of funding on Jan. 22, 2018. Grant proposals are due by March 2, 2018. These funds will be used to support new traffic safety programs and enhance existing programs in the City Prosecutor's Office, Street Transportation, and the Fire and Police Departments. The total citywide request for funding is 1,935,000.00.

Tagged Passions:veterans, streets, public safety, contract, council, abatement, program, funding, traffic, transportation, and grant

City Prosecutor's Office - Total Funding Request 235,000.00 Awarded grant funds will be used to pay the salary, expenses, supplies and/or travel for an existing Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor (TSRP), Attorney IV. Half of the funding ( 117,500.00) will be sought from the Oversight Council on Driving or Operating Under the Influence Abatement Council. The other half of the funding ( 117,500.00) will be requested through this GOHS grant.

The TSRP program will continue its four primary objectives: - Provide training for prosecutors and law enforcement officers in the prosecution of traffic safety related crimes. - Act as a resource for questions about traffic laws and trial advocacy. - Improve communication between prosecutors, law enforcement officers, and members of the judiciary. - Act as a liaison for individuals and agencies committed to the enforcement and prosecution of traffic safety related crimes.

Tagged Passions:legal, public safety, council, abatement, training, travel, program, funding, traffic, grant, and crime

The GOHS has funded the TSRP program since its inception in 2007. Though the grant project is administered by Phoenix, it benefits citizens, law enforcement and

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:public safety, program, and grant

19
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 4

prosecutors across Arizona. The TSRP is a resource to both small and large jurisdictions for legal issues related to the enforcement of DUI and traffic laws. During the latest grant period, the TSRP provided training to approximately 6,000 prosecutors, law enforcement officers, crime lab personnel, interns and community groups. Additionally, Arizona's TSRP is a state and nationwide resource as demonstrated by the more than 1,500 requests for assistance from prosecutors, law enforcement officers and crime lab personnel that were received. It is anticipated that a portion of TSRP expenses may need to be covered by City general funds.

Tagged Passions:legal, personnel, public safety, training, funding, traffic, grant, and crime

Street Transportation Department - Total Funding Request 270,000.00 Roadway Safety/Education Programs: This request will help develop and enhance engineering, educational campaigns and employee tools for roadway, school, bicycle, pedestrian and motorcycle safety. Requests for roadway safety ( 80,000.00) to include funding for: fatal and serious collision reduction plan, traffic and pedestrian safety materials and distracted driving safety education. Requests for pedestrian and bicycle safety ( 130,000.00) to include funding for: pedestrian crossing and pedestrian signal treatment studies, pedestrian/bicycle safety educational materials, bicycle helmets, reflective gear, safety promotional items and LED flashing STOP paddles. Requests for motorcycle safety ( 60,000.00) to include funds for a community outreach and education safety campaign.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:streets, education, Bicycles, Pedestrian, program, materials, funding, traffic, bicycles, and transportation

Fire Department - Total Funding Request 330,000.00 Impaired Driving Program: This request is for overtime and related fringe benefits, materials, and equipment related to high school education campaigns including dramatic mock crashes and classroom education ( 40,000.00). The program informs young drivers of the danger of distracted driving, alcohol, and other drug impairment with the goal of decreasing preventable injuries and fatalities associated with impaired and distracted driving.

Tagged Passions:education, alcohol, equipment, drugs, program, materials, funding, and fire departments and districts

Occupant Protection and Child Car Seat Program: This request is for training, overtime, related fringe benefits, materials, public education and equipment related to child safety seats and seat belt usage ( 250,000.00). This funding will maintain current occupant protection efforts and increase the frequency for conducting child passenger safety technician certification and recertification classes, increase the opportunities to educate residents at car seat check events, increase the number of locations of designated car seat check fitting stations to enhance geographical outreach, and to enhance outreach for occupant protection public education in K-12 schools.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Program: This request is for overtime, related fringe benefits, materials, and equipment related to education campaigns to increase safety

Tagged Passions:education, Bicycles, Pedestrian, training, equipment, events, program, materials, funding, and bicycles

20
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 4

awareness, traffic awareness and skills necessary for young pedestrians and bicyclists ( 40,000.00). This program provides bike rodeos for young cyclists, bike and pedestrian school safety assemblies and public education opportunities at community safety fairs and events.

Tagged Passions:education, Bicycles, Pedestrian, school safety, events, program, traffic, and bicycles

Police Department - Total Funding Request 1,100,000.00 DUI Enforcement Program: This request, through the Traffic Bureau, is for training, overtime, related fringe benefits and equipment to support and enhance DUI enforcement within the City of Phoenix and joint enforcement efforts throughout the valley ( 300,000.00).

Tagged Passions:public safety, training, equipment, program, funding, and traffic

Occupant Protection Program: This request, through the Traffic Education Safety Unit, is for training, materials, supplies, overtime and related fringe benefits associated with Click It or Ticket enforcement activities, child passenger safety technician certification classes, car seat events, Buckle Up Baby Hotline and various seat belt enforcement campaigns ( 100,000.00).

Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Program: This request, through the Traffic Education Safety Unit, is for training, materials, supplies, overtime and related fringe benefits associated with education and enforcement campaigns designed to increase safety awareness, traffic law knowledge and skills among pedestrians and bicyclists ( 200,000.00).

Tagged Passions:education, Bicycles, Pedestrian, training, events, program, materials, traffic, and bicycles

Traffic Services Program: This request, through the Traffic Education Safety Unit, is for training, materials, supplies, equipment (radar/laser speed detection devices), overtime and related fringe benefits associated with education and enforcement campaigns such as: traffic impact programs, school zone enforcement, construction zone enforcement, traffic complaint hotline enforcement and selective traffic enforcement programs ( 200,000.00).

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:education, services, training, equipment, construction, program, materials, and traffic

Motorcycle Safety Program: This request, through the Traffic Education Safety Unit, is for training, materials, supplies, overtime and related fringe benefits associated with an education and enforcement campaign designed to increase safety awareness, traffic law knowledge and specific enforcement of motorcycle traffic law violations ( 100,000.00).

The Traffic Bureau will seek funding from the DUI Abatement Council for overtime and related fringe benefits associated with DUI enforcement and innovative Know Your Limit programs ( 200,000.00). Contract Term

Tagged Passions:education, contract, council, abatement, training, program, materials, funding, and traffic

21
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 4

One year beginning Oct. 1, 2018 through Sept. 30, 2019.

Financial Impact Total funding request is 1,935,000.00. Cost to the City is personnel expenses and in- kind resources only.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:personnel, finance, and funding

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr., the Prosecutor's Office, and the Street Transportation, Fire, and Police Departments.

Tagged Passions:administrator, streets, public safety, manager, and transportation

22
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 5 Authorization to Apply for, Accept, and Enter into Agreements for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Grant Funds This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend approval to City Council for the Police Department to enter into various agreements with the Office of National Drug Control Policy and the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office for up to 2,500,000.00 in funding through the 2018-2019 High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA). THIS ITEM IS FOR CONSENT ACTION

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, policy, council, drugs, funding, and grant

Summary The Police Department has applied for and accepted HIDTA funds annually for more than 11 years. Historically, HIDTA funds are used to support and enhance the Police Department's Drug Enforcement Bureau's Investigations into illegal narcotic distribution enterprises in the Phoenix area and throughout Arizona. These complex investigations usually involve partnerships with other local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. The investigations focus on identifying and disrupting drug organizations, most of which have connections with the Mexican and Columbian drug cartels.

The Arizona Alliance Planning Committee HIDTA Executive Board makes all of the HIDTA funding decisions. The Police Department is requesting approval to accept funds and enter into various agreements for any HIDTA funds made available during the funding period. Funding reimburses the City for salary, overtime, 20 of the associated fringe benefits, and operational supplies associated with the drug trafficking investigations. Contract Term Two years beginning Jan. 1, 2018, through Dec. 31, 2019.
Tagged Passions:public safety, contract, Immigration, drugs, planning, and funding

Financial Impact Permission is requested to accept up to 2,500,000.00 through the various funding sources to receive HIDTA funds. Cost to the City is in-kind resources only.

Tagged Passions:finance and funding

23
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 5

No additional detail provided

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Police Department.

Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, and manager

24
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 6 Fire Department Hiring This report responds to a request from the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee for information on the estimated costs and resources that would be required if the City staffed the Phoenix Fire Department at a ratio of 1.0 first responder firefighters per 1,000 residents. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, council, and fire departments and districts

Summary At the Oct. 11, 2017 Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee meeting, information was presented on the estimated cost to hire additional officers to arrive at a sworn to resident ratio of 2.5 officers per 1,000 residents. At the request of the Subcommittee, staff was directed to perform a similar analysis for the Fire Department. Based on information received from Fire, a ratio of 1.0 first responders per 1,000 residents is a ratio used in the Fire industry to assess staffing levels.

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, human resources, and fire departments and districts

Other Information It is important to consider that no universally accepted best standard exists that stipulates a specific method for determining staffing levels for either Police or Fire services. The per capita method does not consider a variety of factors, which would impact what the optimal staffing model should be for a public safety department. These factors include: square mileage, population density and demographics, sworn deployment and delivery models, crime rates, infrastructure types and condition, regulatory requirements, etc.

The current Fire hiring plan calls for maintaining a sworn count of 1,615 positions, which is the sustainable number of positions based on projected resources in the General Fund (GF) and Public Safety Specialty Funds (PSSF). The current filled count as of December 2017, is 1,635 and includes recruits in the academy and existing positions from the 2015 SAFER grant, which expires at the end of FY 2017-18. Fire was recently awarded an additional 32 positions from a 2016 SAFER grant, which will provide partial funding through FY 2020-21, and requires a match from the GF of approximately 6.3M over the grant period. At the end of the SAFER period in FY 2020 -21, the number of budgeted positions will return to 1,615 to align with projected
Tagged Passions:budget, public safety, human resources, services, rates, regulation, funding, grant, and crime

25
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 6

ongoing resources. However, due to the rising costs of each sworn position, mostly attributable to pension, the number of sustainable positions may need to be lowered in the future if additional resources are not identified. The 1,615 sworn target represents a sworn to resident ratio of 1.0 positions to every 1,000 residents and includes all sworn personnel. According to Fire, the ratio should exclude all secondary support personnel, which consists of 138 ambulance rescue positions, since they are not considered primary response support, or first responders. If this is taken into consideration, the number of sworn positions would need to be increased to 1,753, or an increase of the 138 secondary responders, to achieve the 1:1,000 first responder to resident ratio. Estimated Costs To determine the total estimated costs to increase the sworn count by 138 positions, staff also considered ancillary costs that would be required to support this increase. Those costs include: 28 civilian positions (based on the current authorized sworn to civilian ratio), five new apparatus, related equipment, and ongoing maintenance. The number of stations is currently sufficient to accommodate the increase in staff with the addition of Fire Station 55 located at I-17 and Jomax. Additional stations will be required in the future as population grows to maintain the 1:1,000 first responder to resident ratio. The total estimated cost is 30M and includes 4M in one-time expenses for the purchase of new apparatus and equipment, and 26M for ongoing expenses related to the costs of both sworn and civilian positions. This estimate includes 24M for sworn positions, 2.9M for civilian positions and 3.2M for the purchase of five apparatus, related equipment and ongoing maintenance expenses. The Fire Department provided the cost estimates for purchasing new apparatus and equipment. The personnel expenses were based on the most recent Budget Research Department Salary and Benefit Projection Report for FY 2018-19 using an average cost for positions and does not account for future wage or benefit increases or any changes to compensation as a result of future labor negotiations.

Tagged Passions:personnel, budget, purchasing, grocery, union, compensation, retirement, equipment, and fire departments and districts

Required Resources The resources required to cover the expenditure outlay can not be identified from existing city revenues. Repurposing existing expenditures from other City programs and services is not an option without significant diminishment in service delivery to the public. Therefore, the City would need to increase revenue streams to cover the costs.

Two potential revenue source options could be increasing the local city sales tax rate and/or reinstating the food tax. Arizona cities and towns largely rely on local sales
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, services, sale, and program

26
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 6

taxes to generate the funds necessary to provide, maintain and enhance the service demands of the community. City sales taxes represent the largest category of FY 2017 -18 General Fund revenues at approximately 38 percent. Local sales taxes consist of 14 categories that provide General Fund resources, with the majority of categories at a rate of 2.3 percent. The temporary food for home consumption tax was approved by the City Council in February 2010 as a means to provide additional resources due to the recession. The food tax was implemented at a rate of 2.0 percent and was decreased to 1.0 percent before expiring in March 2015. Every 0.1 percent of sales tax raises approximately 29 million and every 1 percent food tax raises approximately 26 million. Therefore, to cover expenses associated with hiring additional sworn staff to reach a first responder to resident ratio of 1:1,000 and generate roughly 30M, it would require a rate increase of approximately 0.1 percent city sales tax or a 1.2 percent food tax, or some combination. The required sales tax rate increases were determined based on actual prior year sales tax receipts.

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, council, sale, and funding

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Fire and Budget and Research departments.

Tagged Passions:budget, administrator, and manager

27
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 7 Intergovernmental Agreement for a Communications Systems Strategic Alliance This report provides information to the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee regarding an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between the City of Phoenix on behalf of the Regional Wireless Cooperative (RWC) and the City of Mesa on behalf of the Topaz Regional Wireless Cooperative (TRWC), to collaborate concerning delivery of public safety communications services to their respective users when such collaboration benefits at least one of the parties participating in a particular cooperative effort. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY.

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, services, council, wireless, Communications, intergovernmental, Wireless, strategic, and communications

Summary The RWC was formed in 2008 to meet the growing operational and interoperational radio communications needs of public safety and municipal personnel. The RWC is a large, state-of-the-art public safety radio communications network covering over 11,000 square miles in the Phoenix metropolitan region. Police and Fire departments make up the majority of RWC network users.

This collaborative organization is formed under an intergovernmental agreement with a Board of Directors responsible for management, planning, modernization, and expansion. Membership is open to all local, county, state, federal, and tribal governmental entities. The City of Phoenix is the administrative and network managing member responsible for providing financial, budgetary, legal, contracting technical support. With the approval of the RWC Board of Directors, the new IGA establishes the authority to undertake a wide variety of mutually beneficial programs, projects, or activities to support cooperation and save money. Examples include: improving operational efficiencies between and among regional public safety communications systems; technology enhancements; developing common policies and procedures; inter-system sharing; multi-agency grant opportunities; sharing interoperable resources; and maintaining system compatibility. In the future, other organizations and entities may join the CSSA by entering into this IGA as Parties.
Tagged Passions:legal, personnel, arts, budget, public safety, contract, Technology, Communications, expansion, intergovernmental, radio, technology, communications, program, finance, procedure, planning, fire departments and districts, and grant

28
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 7

No additional detail provided

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Deputy City Manager Karen Peters, Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr., and the Office of Government Relations.

Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

29
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 8

Tagged Passions:council

Mountain Rescues Update - 2017

This report provides an update to the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee on Phoenix Fire and Police departments' mountain rescue efforts during calendar year 2017. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION. Summary The Phoenix Fire and Police departments respond daily to hundreds of calls for service ranging from house fires to burglaries, automobile crashes to mountain rescues. The Fire Department's Technical Rescue Team (TRT) and the Police Department's Air Support Unit are responsible for the coordination of mountain rescues that take place within the numerous Phoenix mountain ranges, parks and preserves, and other mountainous locations within the valley. For example, during calendar year 2017, Phoenix Fire responded to 259 total mountain rescue events. These mountain rescues can include scenarios such as a hiker with an injured ankle requiring assistance down a trail using a big wheel (wheelbarrow-type rescue equipment used to extract patients from narrow or rocky trails) to a more serious scenario of an unconscious patient requiring a helicopter lift off of a mountain for transport by ambulance to a local trauma center. Of the 259 mountain rescues that Phoenix Fire conducted during 2017, 95 of those required helicopter coordination with Phoenix Police Department's Air Support Unit. Phoenix Police currently utilizes its entire fleet of helicopters for mountain rescue efforts in various mountain rescue locations including: Camelback Mountain, Piestewa Peak, South Mountain Park, Papago Park, McDowell Mountains, Daisy Mountain/New River, Estrella Mountains, White Tanks and Thunderbird Mountain. In addition, Phoenix Fire regularly responds to mountain rescue calls for service valley-wide. This partnership serves as a successful example of public safety coordination that better serves the Phoenix community.

Tagged Passions:veterans, public safety, trails, watershed, equipment, events, fire departments and districts, transportation, and parks

Legal considerations with charging for mountain rescues:

Tagged Passions:legal

30
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 8

The municipal court has exclusive jurisdiction over the imposition of fines or penalties and can only impose them if the hiker is cited with violating an ordinance. If there is no ordinance violation, the rescue costs would have to be characterized as a debt to the City, which could be enforced without the involvement of the Court. For instance, the Code could provide that anyone who, through his negligence, requires a rescue by the City, is liable for rescue costs. This would necessitate a definition of negligence and rescue costs. Several states have instituted annual hiker card programs. Proceeds from the purchase of the card go to a fund to reimburse the jurisdiction for the costs of a rescue. Hikers not in possession of a card could be charged the costs of the rescue. And cardholders could be charged for the cost if they were negligent or reckless.

Tagged Passions:legal, purchasing, ordinance, program, and court

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Fire and Police departments.

Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, and manager

31
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 9 Departments Budget Update This verbal report provides an update to the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee on the budget status for Police, Fire and the Municipal Court. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION AND DISCUSSION

Tagged Passions:veterans, legal, budget, public safety, council, and court

32
Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee

Tagged Passions:veterans and public safety

City Council Report

Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 10

Tagged Passions:council

Police Body-Worn Cameras Request for Proposals

This report requests the Public Safety and Veterans Subcommittee recommend City Council approval to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for Police body-worn cameras. THIS ITEM IS FOR INFORMATION, DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE ACTION. Summary On Jan. 18, 2017, the City of Phoenix formally cancelled the recommendation to award RFP 16-142 for body-worn cameras. The Police Department has been working with the Information Technology Services Department (ITS) to re-write the technical specifications for the body-worn camera procurement. The ITS Project Manager revised the RFP with the Law Department, Police Department and Finance Department input. The procurement documents have been updated with additional mandatory technology requirements, revised testing requirements and evaluation criteria.
Tagged Passions:veterans, RFP, rfp, public safety, manager, purchasing, services, council, Technology, information technology, technology, finance, and Information Technology

Procurement Process There are currently 300 body-worn cameras being worn by uniformed police officers through a pilot program. These cameras were purchased using grant funds. The goal of the new RFP will be for the Police Department to purchase up to 2,000 cameras utilizing a phased-in approach over a five-year period. The new RFP contains a number of new technical requirements that will allow the City to procure the best hardware, software and storage solutions possible.

The Police Department has 5 million set aside in the current year in the City's contingency fund for body-worn cameras. At full deployment, it is anticipated a portion of that total will be needed annually, depending on the type of cameras in use, to support the staff costs associated with the management of video generated by the program. An evaluation committee will be appointed to conduct detailed evaluations of the proposals, establish a competitive range, and select the proposer(s) to receive the contract award. A portion of this evaluation phase will include comprehensive testing
Tagged Passions:RFP, rfp, public safety, purchasing, appointments, contract, information technology, program, funding, grant, and Information Technology

33
Agenda Date: 2/14/2018, Item No. 10

that will be done at the Police Academy.
Tagged Passions:public safety

Responsible Department This item is submitted by Assistant City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. and the Police, Finance and ITS Departments.

Tagged Passions:administrator, public safety, manager, and finance

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