CO - Arapahoe: Arapahoe County Board of County Commissioners

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Arapahoe County Board of County Commissioners

Kathleen Conti, Chair Pro Tem, District 1 Nancy Sharpe, District 2

Jeff Baker, Chair, District 3 Nancy Jackson, District 4

Bill Holen, District 5

Study Session June 19, 2018 Study Session Topics

*Bees And Chickens (WHR) Discussion of citizen feedback regarding a request to allow bee-keeping and chickens on Residential zoned properties (in back yards of homes) in unincorporated Arapahoe County

Request: Information/Direction

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

Michelle Lantz, Community Compliance Officer, Public Works and Development Caitlyn Cahill, Zoning and Animal Control Manager, Public Works and Development Jan Yeckes, Planning Division Manager, Public Works and Development Dave Schmit, Director, Public Works and Development Todd Weaver, Budget Manager, Finance Robert Hill, Senior Assistant County Attorney

BSR FOR BEES AND CHICKENS JUNE 19, 2018.PDF *Marijuana Enforcement Grant Program (WHR) Update to the Board of County Commissioners on 2018 activities of the Office of the District Attorney and discussion of the filing process for the Grey and Black Market Marijuana Grant Request: Information/Direction

Tagged Passions:public works, Public Works, legal, budget, compliance, pets, manager, development, animal control, chickens, marijuana, market, planning, drugs, grant, Development, program, finance, and zoning

George Brauchler, District Attorney

Tagged Passions:legal

6.19.18 BSR MARIJUANA ENFORCEMENT GRANT PROGRAM.PDF

* To Be Recorded As Required By Law WHR - West Hearing Room Arapahoe County is committed to making its public meetings accessible to persons with disabilities. Assisted listening devices are available. Ask any staff member and we will provide one for you.
Tagged Passions:marijuana, drugs, grant, and program

If you need special accommodations, contact the Commissioners Office at 303-795-4630 or Relay Colorado 711.

Please contact our office at least 3 days in advance to make arrangements.

Administration Building West Hearing Room

5334 S. Prince St. Littleton, CO 80120

303-795-4630 Relay Colorado 711

303-795-4630 Audio Agenda Line

The Arapahoe County Board of County Commissioners typically holds weekly Study Sessions on Monday and Tuesday. Study Sessions (except for Executive Sessions) are open to the public and items for discussion are included on this agenda. Agendas (except for Executive Sessions agendas) are available through the Commissioners Office or through the County s web site at www.arapahoegov.com. Please note that the Board may discuss any topic relevant to County business, whether or not the topic has been specifically noticed on this agenda. In particular, the Board typically schedules time each Monday under Committee Updates to discuss a wide
Tagged Passions:business

range of topics. In addition, the Board may alter the times of the meetings throughout the day, or cancel or reschedule noticed meetings. Questions about this agenda? Contact the

Commissioners Office at 303-795-4630 or by e-mail at commissioners@arapahoegov.com 1:00 P.M. Documents: 2:00 P.M. Documents: Kathleen Conti, Chair Pro Tem, District 1 Nancy Sharpe, District 2

Jeff Baker, Chair, District 3 Nancy Jackson, District 4

Bill Holen, District 5

Study Session June 19, 2018 Study Session Topics

*Bees And Chickens (WHR) Discussion of citizen feedback regarding a request to allow bee-keeping and chickens on Residential zoned properties (in back yards of homes) in unincorporated Arapahoe County

Request: Information/Direction

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

Michelle Lantz, Community Compliance Officer, Public Works and Development Caitlyn Cahill, Zoning and Animal Control Manager, Public Works and Development Jan Yeckes, Planning Division Manager, Public Works and Development Dave Schmit, Director, Public Works and Development Todd Weaver, Budget Manager, Finance Robert Hill, Senior Assistant County Attorney

BSR FOR BEES AND CHICKENS JUNE 19, 2018.PDF *Marijuana Enforcement Grant Program (WHR) Update to the Board of County Commissioners on 2018 activities of the Office of the District Attorney and discussion of the filing process for the Grey and Black Market Marijuana Grant Request: Information/Direction

Tagged Passions:public works, Public Works, legal, budget, compliance, pets, manager, development, animal control, chickens, marijuana, market, planning, drugs, grant, Development, program, finance, and zoning

George Brauchler, District Attorney

Tagged Passions:legal

6.19.18 BSR MARIJUANA ENFORCEMENT GRANT PROGRAM.PDF

* To Be Recorded As Required By Law WHR - West Hearing Room Arapahoe County is committed to making its public meetings accessible to persons with disabilities. Assisted listening devices are available. Ask any staff member and we will provide one for you.
Tagged Passions:marijuana, drugs, grant, and program

If you need special accommodations, contact the Commissioners Office at 303-795-4630 or Relay Colorado 711.

Please contact our office at least 3 days in advance to make arrangements.

Administration Building West Hearing Room

5334 S. Prince St. Littleton, CO 80120

303-795-4630 Relay Colorado 711

303-795-4630 Audio Agenda Line

The Arapahoe County Board of County Commissioners typically holds weekly Study Sessions on Monday and Tuesday. Study Sessions (except for Executive Sessions) are open to the public and items for discussion are included on this agenda. Agendas (except for Executive Sessions agendas) are available through the Commissioners Office or through the County s web site at www.arapahoegov.com. Please note that the Board may discuss any topic relevant to County business, whether or not the topic has been specifically noticed on this agenda. In particular, the Board typically schedules time each Monday under Committee Updates to discuss a wide
Tagged Passions:business

range of topics. In addition, the Board may alter the times of the meetings throughout the day, or cancel or reschedule noticed meetings. Questions about this agenda? Contact the

Commissioners Office at 303-795-4630 or by e-mail at commissioners@arapahoegov.com 1:00 P.M. Documents: 2:00 P.M. Documents: BOCC study session June 19, 2018 Agenda Item Page 1 Bees and Chickens study session Board Summary Report Date: To: Board of County Commissioners Through: Jan Yeckes, Planning Division Manager From: Caitlyn Cahill, Zoning and Animal Control Manager
Tagged Passions:pets, manager, animal control, chickens, planning, and zoning

Subject: Presenting Survey Results (attached reference document): Complete a brief overview and explanation of the survey completed early 2018 and discuss the results. Requesting Direction: To evaluate citizen feedback regarding a request to allow bee-keeping and chickens on Residential zoned properties (in back yards of homes) in unincorporated Arapahoe County.

Direction/Information: Staff requests direction as to whether the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) would like staff to:
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

a) Initiate a Land Development Code amendment process to consider whether to incorporate provisions to allow bee-keeping on residentially-zoned lots (in back yards of homes) within the unincorporated county, or

Tagged Passions:development, Development, and zoning

b) Initiate a Land Development Code amendment process to consider whether to incorporate provisions to allow chickens on residentially-zoned lots (in back yards of homes) within the unincorporated county, or

Tagged Passions:development, chickens, Development, and zoning

c) Initiate a Land Development Code amendment process to consider whether to incorporate provisions to allow both bee-keeping and chickens on residentially-zoned lots (in back yards of homes) within the unincorporated county, or

d) Take no further action on the proposals at this time. Request and Recommendation The BOCC Administration Office requested that Communications Services and the Public Works Planning Division staff provide a synopsis of recent survey results, along with basic recommended regulations, during a study session with the BOCC. This study session will consider the request to move forward with code amendments to allow bee-keeping and raising of chickens in residential areas of the unincorporated county. Several Arapahoe County cities and other metropolitan Denver jurisdictions have regulations to allow bee-keeping and/or raising of chickens. Some citizens of unincorporated Arapahoe County would like to have that same opportunity and approached the County Commissioners to reconsider earlier decisions to limit chickens to Agricultural and some Rural Residential zone districts and to expand bee-keeping to properties smaller than one acre. BOCC study session June 19, 2018 Agenda Item Page 2 Bees and Chickens study session Background Over a period of time, citizens have contacted the Zoning Division to express concerns that Arapahoe County does not have provisions for keeping of back-yard chickens in residential areas and that bee-keeping requires a property of at least one acre. Citizens have spoken at public meetings of the Board of County Commissioners to request consideration of these activities and contacted Commissioners to request that the County change its position on the prohibition of chickens outside agriculturally-zoned properties. Two of the three Rural Residential zone districts (R-A Residential- Agricultural, 2.41-acre lots, and A-2 Agricultural, 9-acre lots) currently allow the keeping of small, non-commercial agricultural animals, such as chickens, for the private use of residents only. Some citizens are also concerned with the one-acre minimum lot size required for bee-keeping. Bee-keeping is currently not addressed in the Land Development Code. An appeal of a use determination by the Zoning Administrator resulted in a determination by the Board of Adjustment that bee-keeping is limited to properties of at least one acre in size. County staff has adhered to this use determination for a number of years. The current citizen-based request would require an amendment to the Land Development Code to address bee-keeping regulations. On July 11, 2016, zoning staff met with the Board of County Commissioners to discuss potential amendments in the Land Development Code allowing for citizens in residential areas to own and keep chickens and bees. Staff was directed to discuss the ongoing benefits and concerns, with other agencies, and to then schedule a follow up Study Session, at a later date.
Tagged Passions:public works, Public Works, property, commercial, administrator, services, development, Communications, chickens, agriculture, communications, rural, planning, regulation, Development, and zoning

On December 4, 2017, zoning staff met with the Board of County Commissioners to discuss the feedback from other jurisdictions with regard to backyard keeping of bees and chickens. The BOCC directed staff to complete a citizen survey. Staff would then come back at a later date to discuss the survey results and present the BOCC with code amendment details.

Discussion
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

Currently: Bees are allowed on residential properties only when the lot is at least one acre in size. Chickens are not allowed on residentially zoned properties or on properties zoned R-E Residential-Estate

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

(minimum 1.61-acre lot size), which is one of three Rural Residential zone districts. Pets, as defined in the County s Land Development Code, do not include chickens, geese, ducks, turkeys

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:pets, development, chickens, rural, and Development

or other poultry or domesticated fowl. Small, non-commercial agricultural animals, allowed in the A-E, A-1, A-2 and R-A zone districts, are defined

as chickens, geese, other small poultry, and/or rabbits, kept only for the private use of the residents of the property where the animals are raised and not for commercial purposes. BOCC study session June 19, 2018 Agenda Item Page 3 Bees and Chickens study session

Tagged Passions:property, commercial, chickens, and agriculture

AGRICULTURAL ZONE DISTRICTS ANIMALS (maximum per lot) A-E (35-acre) A-1 (19-acre) Pets no limit 4 Agricultural Animals per acre no limit no limit Agricultural Animals, Small, Non-Commercial no limit no limit

RURAL RESIDENTIAL ZONE DISTRICTS
Tagged Passions:commercial, pets, agriculture, and rural

ANIMALS (maximum per lot) (min lot size) A-2 (9-acre) R-A (2.41-acre) R-E (1.61-acre) Pets 4 4 3 Agricultural Animals per acre no limit 1 NP Agricultural Animals, Small, Non-Commercial no limit no limit NP

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:commercial, pets, and agriculture

Benefits/Concerns Benefits cited by those who have previously contacted staff include:

Ability to produce local, home-grown food, such as eggs and honey; Opportunity to teach responsibility and urban farming to children in the family; Opportunity to engage in the urban farming movement in more ways than gardening. Concerns have included: Common enforcement concerns include: chickens roaming free on adjacent properties or public right-of- way; welfare/neglect concerns; complaints about predator and rodent infestation; noise complaints. Animal Control is bound by the County Resolution. This Resolution does not have the ability to enforce or address any of these complaints or concerns.
Tagged Passions:pets, animal control, chickens, agriculture, and noise

Complaints from neighbors about setback violations, sanitation, noise and other concerns. Some of these (chicken coop and bee-hive setbacks) could be addressed under zoning regulations; others could not.

Shelters are often impacted by unwanted chickens and roosters that are not allowed. Some jurisdictions use a permit process. This could create administrative costs and challenges to a small Zoning staff. If regulations are developed, the Planning Division would be reluctant to recommend a permit process for these uses. Home Owner Association covenants and restrictions (HOA-CC Rs) may prohibit or otherwise restrict uses that are considered permissible in the County regulations; these would be privately enforced by the HOA, and the County would enforce only County regulations. BOCC study session June 19, 2018 Agenda Item Page 4 Bees and Chickens study session
Tagged Passions:chickens, noise, planning, regulation, solid waste, and zoning

Recommended Regulations The below changes are staff recommendations should the Board provide staff with the direction to proceed with a draft code amendment. At this time, staff is not recommending a permitting process for the allowance of either backyard chickens or bees.

Tagged Passions:chickens and regulation

Chickens (all recommended regulations are for residential, single family detached properties and will not address agriculturally zoned properties):

Chickens would be permitted on residentially zoned lots with single-family detached dwelling units Four (4) chickens would be allowed No roosters would be allowed Preferred setback/height requirements: o Behind home o 10 feet from the side and rear property lines o 10 feet maximum in height
Tagged Passions:property, chickens, regulation, and zoning

Alternative Setback options: o Behind the home, corner lots with no contiguous neighbors may place coop in side yard and

behind front building line o Must meet accessory building setbacks and height requirements regardless of if a building permit is required or not o If PUD residential developments are silent on accessory buildings, staff would need to specify setbacks and heights to be used in those cases Chickens must be kept in coops and not allowed to roam free between dusk and dawn Chickens must be contained to owners property at all times Slaughtering on residential property would not be permitted
Tagged Passions:property, development, chickens, Development, and zoning

Bees (all recommended regulations are for residential, single family detached properties and will not address agriculturally zoned properties):

Tagged Passions:regulation and zoning

Bee means any stage of the common domestic honey bee, Apis mellifera species. Bee does not include Africanized bees and hybrids. Colony means a hive and its equipment and appurtenances, including bees, comb, honey, pollen, and brood.

Hive boxes would be permitted on residentially zoned lots with single-family detached dwelling units Two (2) hive boxes would be allowed Preferred setback/height requirements: o Behind home o 10 feet from the side and rear property lines o 10 feet maximum in height
Tagged Passions:property, equipment, and zoning

Alternative Setback options: o Behind the home, corner lots with no contiguous neighbors may place hives in side yard and

behind front building line o Must meet accessory building setbacks and height requirements regardless of if a building permit is required or not o If PUD residential developments are silent on accessory buildings, staff would need to specify setbacks and heights to be used in those cases BOCC study session June 19, 2018 Agenda Item Page 5 Bees and Chickens study session Attachment
Tagged Passions:development, chickens, Development, and zoning

2018 citizen survey results for the keeping of bees and chickens within unincorporated Arapahoe County Board Summary Report from the December 4, 2017 study session Citizen feedback since August 2017

Alternatives
Tagged Passions:chickens

1.
Direct staff to initiate a Land Development Code amendment process to consider whether new or updated regulations to allow bee-keeping and/or chickens would be appropriate;

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:development, chickens, regulation, and Development

2.
Direct staff to take no further action on these issues at this time (or other direction).

Fiscal Impact Currently the keeping of chickens and bees in residential areas must be handled as zoning violations, and staff time is used to explain our regulations and to address concerns over uses that are not allowed. While some time may be needed to explain and enforce new regulations, much of the information could be provided on the County s website. Some jurisdictions use a permit process. This could create administrative costs and challenges to our small Zoning staff. If regulations are developed, the Planning Division would be reluctant to recommend a permitting process. Reviewed By: Dave Schmit, Director of Public Works and Development Robert Hill, Senior Assistant County Attorney Todd Weaver, Budget Manager, Finance Department

Tagged Passions:public works, Public Works, legal, budget, manager, development, chickens, planning, regulation, Development, finance, and zoning

Report for Backyard Bees and Chickens

Complet ion Rat e: 89.9 Partial 222 T ot als: 2,20 6 Response Counts
Tagged Passions:chickens

1.
Are you in favor of allowing residents in suburban (non-ag ricultural) neig hborhoods to raise backyard chickens and/or bees in hives?

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

1
4 Yes to Chickens only4 Yes to Chickens only 3 No to Chickens only3 No to Chickens only

Tagged Passions:chickens

7
Yes to Bees only7 Yes to Bees only 1 No to Bees only1 No to Bees only

No additional detail provided

72
Yes to both Chickens and Bees 72 Yes to both Chickens and Bees

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

14
No to both Chickens and Bees 14 No to both Chickens and Bees

Value Percent Responses Yes to Chickens only 4.2 82 No to Chickens only 2.8 54 Yes to Bees only 6.5 127 No to Bees only 0.6 11

Tagged Passions:chickens

Yes to both Chickens and Bees 71.9 1,404

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

No to both Chickens and Bees 14.1 276

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

T
ot als: 1,954

2.
If you support backyard chickens and bees in residential areas, how many chickens and/or bee hives would you feel is appropriate?

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

2
Pe rce

nt chickens or bees
Tagged Passions:chickens

0
10

20
30

No additional detail provided

40
Value Percent Responses

No additional detail provided

Bee Hives: 1 19.4 375

No additional detail provided

Bee Hives: 2 26.3 507

No additional detail provided

Bee Hives: 3 36.9 713

No additional detail provided

None: I don't support chickens or bees 14.8 286

Tagged Passions:chickens

3.
Do you have concerns about backyard chickens and bee hives?

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

3
35 Yes35 Yes

65 NO65 NO Value Percent Responses Yes 34.9 673

NO 65.1 1,256

No additional detail provided

T
ot als: 1,929

4.
If you have concerns about backyard chickens and bee hives, please explain

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

4
5. Would you raise backyard chickens or bees in suburban Arapahoe County if a permit or reg istration were required?

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

50
Yes50 Yes50 No50 No

5
Value Percent Responses

Yes 50.3 964 No 49.7 954

T
ot als: 1,918

6. If a permit is required, what fee would you be willing to pay to raise backyard chickens and bees? 72 50 or less72 50 or less
Tagged Passions:chickens

12
50 - 10012 50 - 100

No additional detail provided

16
100 +16 100 +

Value Percent Responses 50 or less 72.2 1,359

50
- 100 12.1 227

100 + 15.7 295 T ot als: 1,881 6 7. Please describe the style of neig hborhood/home style that you live in?

5
Rural/Agricultural5 Rural/Agricultural

Tagged Passions:agriculture and rural

85
Suburban Detached Home85 Suburban Detached Home

10
Attached Town home/Condo or Apartments 10 Attached Town home/Condo or Apartments

Value Percent Responses

Rural/Agricultural 4.9 93

Suburban Detached Home 85.2 1,622
Tagged Passions:agriculture and rural

Attached T own home/Condo or Apartments 9.9 188

No additional detail provided

T
ot als: 1,90 3

8. Please describe the area of Arapahoe County that you live in?

7
23 Western: (Littleton, Sheridan, Englewood, etc.) 23 Western: (Littleton, Sheridan, Englewood, etc.)

64 Central: (Centennial, Foxfield, Aurora) 64 Central: (Centennial, Foxfield, Aurora)

4
Eastern: (Watkins, Byers, Strasburg, Deer Trail) 4 Eastern: (Watkins, Byers, Strasburg, Deer Trail)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:trails

10
Northern: (Glendale, north Aurora, 4 Square Mile area) 10 Northern: (Glendale, north Aurora, 4 Square Mile area)

Value Percent Responses Western: (Littleton, Sheridan, Englewood, etc.) 22.5 423

Central: (Centennial, Foxfield, Aurora) 63.9 1,201

Eastern: (Watkins, Byers, Strasburg, Deer T rail) 3.9 73

Tagged Passions:transportation

Northern: (Glendale, north Aurora, 4 Square Mile area) 9.7 183

No additional detail provided

T
ot als: 1,880

9.
Are there any additional comments, sug g estions or feedback that you would like to provide?

No additional detail provided

8
9

BOCC drop in December 4, 2017 Agenda Item Page 1 Bees and Chickens drop in Board Summary Report Date: To: Board of County Commissioners Through: Jan Yeckes, Planning Division Manager From: Caitlyn Cahill, Zoning and Animal Control Manager Michelle Lantz, Community Compliance Officer
Tagged Passions:compliance, pets, manager, animal control, chickens, planning, and zoning

Subject: Requesting Direction: To evaluate a citizen-based request to allowing bee-keeping and chickens on Residential zoned properties (in back yards of homes) in unincorporated Arapahoe County

Direction/Information: Staff requests direction as to whether the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) would like staff to:
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

a) Initiate a Land Development Code amendment process to consider whether to incorporate provisions to allow bee-keeping and raising chickens on residentially-zoned lots (in back yards of homes) within the unincorporated county, or

b) Take no further action on the proposals at this time. Request and Recommendation The BOCC Administration Office requested that Planning Division staff provide support during a study session requested by citizens to discuss possible opportunities for bee-keeping and raising of chickens in residential areas of the unincorporated county. Several Arapahoe County cities and other metropolitan Denver jurisdictions have regulations to allow bee-keeping and/or raising of chickens. Some citizens of unincorporated Arapahoe County would like to have that same opportunity and approached the County Commissioners to reconsider earlier decisions to limit chickens to Agricultural and some Rural Residential zone districts and to expand bee-keeping to properties smaller than one acre. Background Over a period of time, citizens have contacted the Zoning Division to express concerns that Arapahoe County does not have provisions for keeping of back-yard chickens in residential areas and that bee- keeping requires a property of at least one acre. BOCC drop in December 4, 2017 Agenda Item Page 2 Bees and Chickens drop in Citizens have spoken at public meetings of the Board of County Commissioners to request consideration of these activities and contacted Commissioners to request that the County change its position on the prohibition of chickens outside agriculturally-zoned properties. Two of the three Rural Residential zone districts (R-A Residential-Agricultural, 2.41-acre lots, and A-2 Agricultural, 9-acre lots) currently allow the keeping of small, non-commercial agricultural animals, such as chickens, for the private use of residents only. Some citizens are also concerned with the one-acre minimum lot size required for bee-keeping. Bee- keeping is currently not addressed in the Land Development Code. An appeal of a use determination by the Zoning Administrator resulted in a determination by the Board of Adjustment that bee-keeping is limited to properties of at least one acre in size. County staff has adhered to this use determination for a number of years. The current citizen-based request would require an amendment to the Land Development Code to address bee-keeping regulations. On July 11, 2016, zoning staff met with the Board of County Commissioners to discuss potential amendments in the Land Development Code allowing for citizens in residential areas to own and keep chickens and bees. Staff was directed to discuss the ongoing benefits and concerns, with other agencies, and to then schedule a follow up Study Session, at a later date. Discussion
Tagged Passions:property, commercial, administrator, development, chickens, agriculture, rural, planning, regulation, Development, and zoning

Currently: Bees are allowed on residential properties only when the lot is at least one acre in size. Chickens are not allowed on residentially zoned properties or on properties zoned R-E

Residential-Estate (minimum 1.61-acre lot size), which is one of three Rural Residential zone districts.
Tagged Passions:chickens, rural, and zoning

Pets, as defined in the County s Land Development Code, do not include chickens, geese, ducks, turkeys or other poultry or domesticated fowl.

Small, non-commercial agricultural animals, allowed in the A-E, A-1, A-2 and R-A zone districts, are defined as chickens, geese, other small poultry, and/or rabbits, kept only for the private use of the residents of the property where the animals are raised and not for commercial purposes.

Tagged Passions:property, commercial, pets, development, chickens, agriculture, and Development

AGRICULTURAL ZONE DISTRICTS

Tagged Passions:agriculture

ANIMALS (maximum per lot) A-E (35-acre) A-1 (19-acre) Pets no limit 4 Agricultural Animals per acre no limit no limit Agricultural Animals, Small, Non-Commercial no limit no limit

RURAL RESIDENTIAL ZONE DISTRICTS

Tagged Passions:commercial, pets, agriculture, and rural

ANIMALS (maximum per lot) (min lot size) A-2 (9-acre) R-A (2.41-acre) R-E (1.61-acre) Pets 4 4 3

BOCC drop in December 4, 2017 Agenda Item Page 3 Bees and Chickens drop in Agricultural Animals per acre no limit 1 NP Agricultural Animals, Small, Non-Commercial no limit no limit NP

Tagged Passions:commercial, pets, chickens, and agriculture

Benefits/Concerns Some benefits cited by those who have previously contacted staff include:

Ability to produce local, home-grown food, such as eggs and honey; Opportunity to teach responsibility and urban farming to children in the family; Opportunity to engage in the urban farming movement in more ways than gardening. Potential concerns may include: Common enforcement concerns include: chickens roaming free on adjacent properties or public right-of-way; welfare/neglect concerns; complaints about predator and rodent infestation; noise complaints. Animal Control is bound by the County Resolution. This Resolution does not have the ability to enforce or address any of these complaints or concerns.
Tagged Passions:pets, animal control, chickens, agriculture, and noise

Complaints from neighbors about setback violations, sanitation or other concerns. Some of these (chicken coop and bee-hive setbacks) could be addressed under zoning regulations; others could not.

Shelters are often impacted by unwanted chickens and roosters that are not allowed. Some jurisdictions use a permit process. This could create administrative costs and challenges to a small Zoning staff. If regulations are developed, the Planning Division would be reluctant to recommend a permit process for these uses. Home Owner Association covenants and restrictions (HOA-CC Rs) may prohibit or otherwise restrict uses that are considered permissible in the County regulations; these would be privately enforced by the HOA, and the County would enforce only County regulations. Attachment Synopsis of how other jurisdictions are handling these two topics, in addition to a list of feedback from other jurisdictions through the State of Colorado are included in this report. Alternatives
Tagged Passions:chickens, planning, regulation, solid waste, and zoning

1.
Direct staff to initiate a Land Development Code amendment process to consider whether new or updated regulations to allow bee-keeping and chickens would be appropriate;

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:development, chickens, regulation, and Development

2.
Direct staff to take no further action on these issues at this time (or other direction).

Fiscal Impact Currently the keeping of chickens and bees in residential areas must be handled as zoning violations, and staff time is used to explain our regulations and to address concerns over uses that are not allowed. While some time may be needed to explain and enforce new regulations, much of the information could be provided on the County s web site. BOCC drop in December 4, 2017 Agenda Item Page 4 Bees and Chickens drop in Some jurisdictions use a permit process. This could create administrative costs and challenges to our small Zoning staff. If regulations are developed, the Planning Division would be reluctant to recommend a permit process. These uses could be defined in the Land Development Code as accessory to the principal residential use occurring on the same property and could include specific provisions, such as setbacks for the use, or structures associated with the use, and maximum number of chickens per lot. Reviewed By: Dave Schmit, Director of Public Works and Development Robert Hill, Senior Assistant County Attorney Todd Weaver, Budget Manager, Finance Department

Tagged Passions:public works, Public Works, property, legal, budget, manager, development, chickens, planning, regulation, Development, finance, and zoning

1
Arapahoe County cities that allow the keeping of chickens and bees on most residential property include Aurora, Centennial, Littleton, Englewood and Greenwood Village. Zoning regulations in these areas have similar language to prevent nuisance issues from occurring. Examples of these common regulations are; Limiting the number of hens allowed per household. Prohibiting roosters Specific types of enclosures (fully enclosed / predator resistant) Size and location of the enclosure Odor, waste and drainage must be maintained as to not constitute a nuisance

Tagged Passions:property, chickens, stormwater, regulation, and zoning

Feedback from other jurisdictions: Agency Pros Cons

Denver Limited issues with citizens that maintain Food Producing Animal Permit (limits number of chickens/ducks and prohibits roosters) -Continuing to have issues with roosters
Tagged Passions:chickens

-Number of birds owned

Westminster -produce fresh eggs - Experience raising chickens

Thornton Spent more time enforcing the prohibition of chickens Steamboat Springs Residents are happy to own chickens -Chickens not being contained -Noise concerns

Tagged Passions:chickens and noise

-Dogs or other predators breaking in to chicken coops

Lone Tree Not allowed. City has had to enforce on citizens keeping chickens unlawfully. Englewood Does not have a limit on number of chickens or roosters. Struggles with issues of cleanliness and noise. Commerce City Does not allow chickens or bees in residential areas. Golden -Promotes self-sufficiency and agricultural learning opportunities
Tagged Passions:trees, pets, chickens, agriculture, and noise

- Honey bees are beneficial to the environment.

-Population control (too many bees)
Tagged Passions:Conservation and environment

-Noise from chickens

-predator control (chickens)
Tagged Passions:chickens and noise

2
Chicken and Beekeeping restrictions and regulations in surrounding jurisdictions ADAMS COUNTY Chickens and Bee Keeping

Limits on chickens and bees are based on livestock unit calculations per acre. Chickens and bees not permitted on properties under 1 acre.
Tagged Passions:chickens, livestock, and regulation

DOUGLAS COUNTY Chickens (4) Chickens are allowed in all zone categories (properties greater than 2.3 acres can have more) No Roosters Shall be properly housed and shall be located in accordance with the required accessory use set back

Bee Keeping Code is silent. No regulations and no language prohibiting bee keeping JEFFERSON COUNTY Chickens The keeping of chickens on single family detached, Two-family dwelling or duplex residential lots. The maximum total number which may be kept shall be 6. Roosters are not permitted.

Tagged Passions:chickens and regulation

A
Permit must be obtained from Planning and Zoning for the keeping of chickens. For this use, the permit shall only be applicable to the current owner or lessee and does not run with the property.

Chicken coop enclosures must be predator resistant. Coops and runs may not be located within the front yard. Chickens are to be kept for personal use. Adjacent lots and any registered HOA shall be notified in writing of the use. Lot and Building Standards Coops and runs shall meet all setback requirements, unless they meet the following conditions: No openings of the coop structure shall be allowed that exceed the height of the screening on sides of the coop which are adjacent to other property boundaries; The coops and enclosure are screened from neighbors view by a minimum 5 foot high solid, closed fence. Bee Keeping Keeping of bees on single family detached, Two-family dwelling or Duplex residential lots.
Tagged Passions:property, chickens, planning, and zoning

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permit must be obtained from Planning and Zoning for the keeping of bees.

Size and location of hive meeting applicable setbacks of zone district Hives shall meet all setback requirements, unless they are screened from neighbors' view by a minimum 5 foot high closed fence.
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(2) Two hives shall be permitted on lots with a minimum of 4,000 square feet.

One additional hive shall be permitted for each 4,000 square feet of lot area exceeding 4,000 square feet.

CITY OF BRIGHTON Chickens (6) Chickens per household No roosters Shelters shall meet the height and setback standards required by current zoning

Bee Keeping Only the common honeybee (apis mellifera) may be kept and raised. Keeping any other type of bee is strictly prohibited. Non-aggressive queens shall be selected for the generation of a colony. A convenient water source must be provided within the fly path of the hive.
Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, chickens, water, and zoning

Hives must be at least 15 from any property line or public right-of-way, unless a flyway is provided, and kept in the backyard.

Flyways are a 6 tall fence, wall, or thick hedge that directs the path of the bee up and out of the property. The hive shall also be oriented to face in towards the property so that the bees have a 10 clear flight path in front of the hive.

Tagged Passions:property

Number of hives: Properties that are acre or smaller (21,780 SF) can have a maximum of 2 hives Properties that are - 1 acre (21,780-43,560 SF) can have a maximum of 4 hives, or Properties that are larger than 1 acre (43,560 SF) can have a maximum of 8 hives.

Hives that are more than 200 from any property line shall not be limited in number.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:property

CITY OF ENGLEWOOD Chickens Chickens are allowed in all zone categories. No limit on number of chickens or roosters.

Bee Keeping Bee keeping requires a permit with a limit of (3) hives per premises. Applicant must have:
Tagged Passions:chickens

1.
Prior experience, experienced mentor, active membership in a beekeeping organization or classes in apiculture.

No additional detail provided

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A backyard fenced with a six foot privacy fence or hedges high enough to encourage bees to overfly neighboring properties. Or signed affidavits from contiguous neighbors indicating they approve of the hives w/o fencing or hedges.

3. A water source in the backyard 4. At least (2) contact names and numbers in the event of swarms or other issues.

Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, privacy, water, and events

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CITY OF DENVER Chickens No more than 8 chickens and ducks combined per zone lot.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

No structure used to house the animals may be closer than 15 feet to: (1) a structure on an abutting zone lot containing a dwelling unit, and (2) a dwelling unit not the residence of the animal keeper(s) and located in a primary structure on the same zone lot.

On any residential zone lot, the animals shall be maintained in the rear 50 of the Zone Lot Depth.

No additional detail provided

Slaughtering of the animals as part of keeping such animals is prohibited

Bee Keeping 2 hives per zone lot;

Hives must be in rear 1/3 of zone lot with a 5 foot setback from side and rear zone lot lines; Hives must be screened so that the bees must surmount a 6 foot barrier, which may be vegetative, before leaving the property; No outdoor storage of any bee paraphernalia or hive materials not being used as a part of a hive.

Tagged Passions:materials and property

CITY OF LITTLETON Chickens (4) Chickens allowed. No Roosters. Allowed in most residential zones. Chickens may not run at large in the City and upon the property of others or upon the streets, alleys or other public places within the City.

Tagged Passions:property, streets, and chickens

Chickens: As accessory to a single-family residential use in the R-1, R-2, R-3, and R-E zone districts, a maximum of not more than four (4) chicken hens are permitted, subject to the following standards:

The chicken hens must be provided with a covered predator resistant chicken house that is properly ventilated and designed to be easily accessed, cleaned and maintained. The chicken house must have a minimum of two (2) square feet of floor space per bird with an attached outdoor enclosure. The outdoor enclosure must have a minimum of ten (10) square feet per bird. Neither the chicken house nor the outdoor enclosure may be located less than fifteen feet (15') from any abutting property line. Roosters are prohibited. No person may own or keep a rooster in R-1, R-2, R-3, and R-E zone districts. The chicken hens may not be killed by or at the direction of the owner or keeper thereof, except pursuant to lawful order of an appropriate state, county, or city official, or for the purpose of euthanasia when surrendered to a licensed veterinarian or the Humane Society for such purpose, or as otherwise expressly permitted by law. Odor, dust, waste, and drainage must be controlled so as not to constitute a nuisance, safety hazard or health problem to adjoining property or uses. (Ord. 4, Series of 2010)

Tagged Passions:health, property, pets, license, animal control, chickens, and stormwater

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Bee Keeping Definitions: The following words, terms and phrases, when used in this section, shall have meanings APIARY: A place where one or more beehives are kept. BEE: The adult stage of the common domestic honeybee, Apis mellifera species. BEEKEEPER: Any person who owns or maintains a bee colony. COLONY: A hive and its equipment and appurtenances, including bees, comb, honey, pollen, and brood. HIVE: A structure intended for the housing of one bee colony. A hive, including the attached honey supers, shall not exceed twelve (12) cubic feet in size.

Tagged Passions:equipment and housing

ROBBING: The pilfering of honey from a weak colony by other honeybees or insects. TRACT: A contiguous parcel of land under common ownership.

(B) Hives: All bee colonies shall be kept in hives with removable combs, which shall be kept in sound and usable condition.(C) Setback: All hives shall be located at least five feet (5') from any adjoining property with the back of the hive facing the nearest adjoining property. (D) Fencing Of Flyways: In each instance in which any colony is situated within twenty five feet (25') of a developed public or private property line of the tract upon which the apiary is situated, as measured from the nearest point on the hive to the property line, the beekeeper shall establish and maintain a flyway barrier at least six feet (6') in height consisting of a solid wall or fence parallel to the property line and extending ten feet (10') beyond the colony in each direction so that all bees are forced to fly at an elevation of at least six feet (6') above ground level over the property lines in the vicinity of the apiary. (E) Water: Each property owner or beekeeper shall ensure that a convenient source of water is available at all times to the bees so that the bees will not congregate at swimming pools, bibcocks, pet water bowls, birdbaths or other water sources where they may cause human, bird or domestic pet contact. The water shall be maintained so as not to become stagnant. (F) Maintenance: Each property owner or beekeeper shall ensure that no bee comb or other materials that might encourage robbing are left upon the grounds of the apiary site. Upon their removal from the hive, all such materials shall promptly be disposed of in a sealed container or placed within a building or other bee proof enclosure. (G) Queens: In any instance in which a colony exhibits usually aggressive characteristics by stinging or attempting to sting without due provocation or exhibits an unusual disposition towards swarming, it shall be the duty of the beekeeper to requeen the colony. Queens shall be selected from stock bred for gentleness and nonswarming characteristics (H) Colony Densities: 1. it shall be unlawful to keep any colony on a multiple-family lot or to keep more than the following number of colonies on any tract within the city, based upon the size or configuration of the tract on which the apiary is situated: (a) Less than one-half (1/2) acre lot size: Four (4) colonies; (b) One-half (1/2) acre or more but less than one acre lot size: Six (6) colonies; (c) One acre or larger lot size: Eight (8) colonies;
Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, materials, property, pets, insect, unusual, and water

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(d) Regardless of lot size, where all hives are situated at least two hundred feet (200') in any direction from all property lines of the lot on which the apiary is situated, there shall be no limit to the number of colonies.

Tagged Passions:property

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For each two (2) colonies authorized under colony densities, subsection (H)1 of this section, there may be maintained upon the same tract one nucleus colony in a hive structure not exceeding one standard nine and five-eighths inch (95/8 ) depth ten (10) frame hive body with no supers attached as required from time to time for management of swarms. Each such nucleus colony shall be disposed of or combined with an authorized colony within thirty (30) days after the date it is acquired.

CITY OF CENTENNIAL Chickens A total of (6) chickens, provided that chickens must be contained in a covered enclosure between dusk and dawn. Any Rooster over the age of 6 months is prohibited in all zones.

Requirements for Accessory Buildings or Structures for the Keeping of Chickens Height. Height shall not exceed 10 feet to the peak of the roof. Setbacks Front: Behind the principal building. Street Side: Equal to the street side setback required for the principal building. Interior Side: 10 feet. Rear: 10 feet. Bee Keeping Requirements for Accessory Buildings or Structures for Beekeeping. Permitted Lots. Hive boxes are only permitted on residentially and agriculturally zoned lots with singlefamily detached dwelling units. Hive Box Height and Area. Hive boxes and any ground-mounted appurtenances are permitted to be a combined height of up to six (6) feet above ground level and up to ten (10) cubic feet in area. Setbacks. Front: Behind the principal building. Street Side: Equal to the street side setback required for the principal building. Interior Side: Ten (10) feet. Rear: Ten (10) feet. Hive Boxes. All bee colonies shall be kept in hive boxes with movable combs or frames. Hive Box Maximums. Maximum hive boxes permitted per residential and agricultural zone lot: Lots less than one-quarter acre in size: Two (2) hive boxes. Lots between one-quarter acre and less than one-half acre in size: Four (4) hive boxes. Lots between one-half acre and less than one-acre in size: Six (6) hive boxes. Lots between one-acre and less than two-acres in size: Eight (8) hive boxes. Lots two acres and greater in size: Twelve (12) hive boxes.
Tagged Passions:streets, chickens, agriculture, and zoning

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Exception: For lots where all hive boxes are situated at least two hundred fifty (250) feet in any direction from all property lines of the lot, there is no limit as to the maximum hive boxes permitted per residential lot.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:property

CITY OF AURORA Chickens Chickens are allowed in residential areas with an approved permit from the city. Owners can have no more than 6 chickens at any given time; roosters are prohibited on resident property. For all single-family residential properties upon lots of 20,000 or more square feet in size up to 8 chicken hens will be allowed, but no roosters.

Chickens must be provided a chicken house and an adjacent 6-square-foot or larger enclosure; chickens must have access to such house and enclosure during daylight hours. Chickens must be secured in the chicken house from dusk to dawn. Chickens may not run at large. HOUSE REQUIREMENTS: House must be covered and predator-resistant. House may be located in rear yard only. House must be at least 2 square feet per chicken in floor space, but not greater than 120 square feet. House must be properly ventilated and designed to be easily accessed, cleaned, and maintained
Tagged Passions:property and chickens

Setbacks: Structure must be located at least 15 feet from the property line of any abutting properties. If Owner wishes the structure to be closer than 15 feet to an abutting property, Owner must get written consent from the property owner(s) of the affected properties.

Bee Keeping Setback. All hives shall be located at least five feet from any adjoining property with the back of the hive facing the nearest adjoining property.

Tagged Passions:property

Fencing of flyways. In each instance in which any colony is situated within 25 feet of a developed public or private property line of the tract upon which the apiary is situated, as measured from the nearest point on the hive to the property line, the beekeeper shall establish and maintain a flyway barrier at least six feet in height consisting of a solid wall or fence parallel to the property line and extending ten feet beyond the colony in each direction so that all bees are forced to fly at an elevation of at least six feet above ground level over the property lines in the vicinity of the apiary.

Water. Each beekeeper shall ensure that a convenient source of water is available at all times to the bees so that the bees will not congregate at swimming pools, bibcocks, pet water bowls, birdbaths or other water sources where they may cause human, bird or domestic pet contact. The water shall be maintained so as not to become stagnant. Maintenance. Each beekeeper shall ensure that no bee comb or other materials that might encourage robbing are left upon the grounds of the apiary site. Upon their removal from the hive, all such materials shall promptly be disposed of in a sealed container or placed within a building or other bee-proof enclosure.
Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, materials, property, pets, and water

Queens. In any instance in which a colony exhibits unusually aggressive characteristics by stinging or attempting to sting without due provocation or exhibits an unusual disposition towards swarming, it

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:unusual

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shall be the duty of the beekeeper to re-queen the colony. Queens shall be selected from stock bred for gentleness and nonswarming characteristics.

Colony densities: It shall be unlawful to keep more than the following number of colonies on any tract within the city, based upon the size or configuration of the tract on which the apiary is situated: One-quarter acre or less tract size Two colonies; More than one-quarter acre but less than one-half acre tract size Four colonies; One-half acre or more but less than one acre tract size Six colonies; One acre or larger tract size Eight colonies;

Regardless of tract size, where all hives are situated at least 200 feet in any direction from all property lines of the tract on which the apiary is situated, there shall be no limit to the number of colonies.

Tagged Passions:property

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Caitlyn Cahill From: Caitlyn Cahill Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 10:46 AM Subject: Regulation Feedback: Unincorporated Arapahoe County Attachments: HOA Bee Chicken Feedback.pdf

Hello: You are receiving this email because you are listed as the point of contact in our HOA database for one of the single family Homeowners Associations, within unincorporated Arapahoe County. If you are receiving this email by mistake, please let me know and we will update our records. If you manage multiple HOAs, please provide feedback based on each specific HOA. Arapahoe County has received a number of requests to allow the keeping of backyard chickens and bees in unincorporated suburban areas of Arapahoe County. This year, the Board of County Commissioners asked County staff to research nearby zoning rules and draft a proposed set of regulations for consideration that would allow backyard chickens and bees in Arapahoe County.
Tagged Passions:chickens, regulation, and zoning

Please see the attached letter requesting information from the Homeowners Associations most affected by this potential change in regulations. All email responses should go to zoning@arapahoegov.com and should be provided no later than March 31, 2018.

Thank you, Caitlyn Cahill Zoning Animal Control Manager 6924 South Lima Street, Centennial, CO 80112 Zoning: 720 874 6711 Animal Control: 720 874 6750 Direct: 720 874 6753 ccahill@arapahoegov.com http://www.arapahoegov.com
Tagged Passions:pets, manager, animal control, regulation, and zoning

From: Scott Kemmeries To: Michelle Lantz; Zoning; Kathleen Conti Subject: Backyard chickens and bee keeping in Arapahoe County Date: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 12:48:59 PM

I understand there is an upcoming meeting regarding zoning for raising backyard chickens and bees. I live in the unincorporated Holly Hills neighborhood and would like to request you change the law/zoning regulations to allow residents the option to do both.
Tagged Passions:chickens, regulation, neighborhood, and zoning

In general, I believe that unincorporated areas should generally have fewer restrictions than incorporated ones. In recent years a great many people around the country have begun successfully raising chickens or keeping bees in cities and suburbs, and I believe the overall results have been positive.

Regarding chickens, I support efforts to allow raising chickens, with proper process and restrictions similar to what Denver and many other cities have done. I understand concerns many have regarding odors or other problems, but like any other right or privilege, if you don't follow the law you can be punished or have your rights taken away from you. I feel strongly that those who can follow the law and prevent disturbances or harm to others should be allowed to proceed with what makes them happy. It's not like we're talking about cattle or tigers. Many others jurisdictions have shown it can work, and government should attempt to reduce restrictions and regulations where it makes sense, and in this case I think it does. Regarding bees, similar reasoning applies, with the additional benefit to the environment considering the terrible reduction in bee population across the country. Sincerely, Scott Kemmeries 3013 Robin Way Denver, CO 80222 Arapahoe County

Tagged Passions:Clemson, chickens, Conservation, regulation, and environment

From: Tom Tanner To: Zoning Subject: bees and chickens Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2018 8:34:48 AM

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

Good morning I read that the County is comparing other County rules and questionnaire was to be submitted by March 1. Have Commissioners via your office made any decision yet. I ask as I serve on Saddle Rock Ridge HOA board which is in unincorporated Arapahoe and we have owners submitting requests of us but we wish to know County rules. Tom Tanner

No additional detail provided

From: Darrin Rynders To: Zoning Subject: bees and chickens Date: Thursday, February 22, 2018 12:21:56 PM

Hi, I just filled out your survey for allowing bees and chickens in the county. My concern on the survey is why there was not an option for no permit required . Why do the powers that be feel the need to forcibly extract money from citizens where no service if given in return? Thanks for your time and have a great day Darrin Rynders
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

From: Jim Morsman To: Zoning Subject: Bees and chickens Date: Thursday, January 25, 2018 3:40:54 PM

As a free man I do not need your permission to raise chickens and bees responsibly in my backyard. Obtaining fresh, healthy food for my family is my right as a human being. I am having trouble seeing why a person in Denver on a tiny, tiny lot (.10 acres or less) is allowed to have 6 chickens, bees and a goat and I can have nothing on my half acre lot. That is ridiculous. People in Littleton city limits .3 miles from me can have bees, chickens and goats. But I can not. The narrative behind not allowing such creatures is ignorant. People talk about smell. Smell is not a concern when you only have 6 chickens. One regular sized dog will put out more and smellier poop than 6 chickens.
Tagged Passions:pets, chickens, and zoning

What about roosters? No one is advocating for roosters.

Predation? Responsibly kept chickens do not increase or attract predators.

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Noise? Chickens make less noise than dogs, geese and most birds.

Tagged Passions:pets, chickens, and noise

Property values? There is no correlation between allowing chickens and a lowered property value.

I am surprised no one has sued Arapahoe county over this nonsense. Again, I am a free man and an American citizen. I do not need the permission of the government to responsibly raise chickens and bees. Obtaining healthy food for my family is my right as a human being. I would love to talk to a conservative that does not agree with me. Jim Morsman Free Man
Tagged Passions:property and chickens

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Caitlyn Cahill From: Charlotte Bucher Sent: Friday, March 2, 2018 12:00 PM To: Caitlyn Cahill Subject: Re: RE: chichens or bees

Personal opinion. In a message dated 3/1/2018 12:50:01 PM Mountain Standard Time, CCahill@arapahoegov.com writes:

Good Afternoon Char,

Thank you for the feedback. Yesterday I sent out an email to all the HOAs that we had on file requesting their feedback. Is your email based on that request and the position of the HOA or a personal opinion as a resident? I would just like to make sure that I represent your feedback accurately. Thank you, Caitlyn Cahill Zoning Animal Control Manager 6924 South Lima Street, Centennial, CO 80112 Zoning: 720 874 6711 Animal Control: 720 874 6750 Direct: 720 874 6753 ccahill@arapahoegov.com http://www.arapahoegov.com From: Charlotte Bucher [mailto:dgbucher@aol.com] Sent: Thursday, March 1, 2018 11:25 AM To: Zoning Subject: chichens or bees

Tagged Passions:pets, manager, animal control, and zoning

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I think that the homes in Huntington Estates are too close together to have to also ahare space with chickens unless the owners are scrupulous about picking up after them, like others do for the dogs. Bees are good for the pollination of the flowers which all grow during the summer, but the addition of wasps is not lovely for walkers. Char Bucher

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:pets and chickens

From: Gary Abrams To: Zoning Subject: chickens and bess in Huntington Estates Date: Thursday, May 17, 2018 2:17:19 PM

Please enforce your existing laws than ban chickens and bees in parts of Arapahoe County unincorporated. We live at 9359 E. Evans Place Denver Colorado 80231. The property directly across the street located at 9358 E. Evans Place Denver Colorado 80231 is raising chickens and bees. We live in a suburban area that over time is becoming more of a close-in urban area. Our property values have the potential to appreciate. Having chickens making a constant racket will hurt our property values. I know this because I have been a realtor for the last 41 years. The additional bees do present a health hazard to those (some of whom are children in our neighborhood) who may be allergic to them. Gary Abrams 9359 E. Evans Pl. Denver, CO 80231 303-671-8415 Office 303-671-7912 Fax 303-898-1850 Mobile realestate@exclusivecompanies.com
Tagged Passions:health, property, chickens, neighborhood, and zoning

From: Kristi Stanlis To: Michelle Lantz; Zoning; Nancy Sharpe Subject: Chickens, please Date: Thursday, May 31, 2018 9:09:25 AM

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern; I am writing to express my support in zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe county. I am a resident of Willow Trace who support my neighbors' and community s interest in having backyard chickens and/or bee-keeping. I believe a healthy community is one that allows families to live more sustainably. Raising backyard chickens and bee-keeping are examples of this. I do not see this any differently than responsibly raising dogs or cats. In fact, chickens and bees create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance. Many neighboring communities to me allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping because they recognize the value it brings to their community. Backyard chickens provide fresh eggs, healthy composting and an opportunity to teach children responsibility, empathy for animals and a lesson in where our food comes from. With responsible owners, backyard chickens are wonderful pets and members of the family. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. It s nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable. I sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Also, some guidance in dealing with the nearly impossible to alter HOA covenants would be helpful. Thank you for your consideration. Kristi Stanlis 20579 E. Saratoga Pl Aurora, CO 80015

Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, chickens, noise, and zoning

From: PCMS Corp Office To: Zoning Cc: Caitlyn Cahill Subject: FW: FW: Regulation Feedback: Unincorporated Arapahoe County Date: Wednesday, March 28, 2018 12:43:09 PM Attachments: image001.png

Caitlyn Please see comments below from a resident at The Farm at Arapahoe County Homeowners Association. Thank you Jessica Moser PCMS
Tagged Passions:agriculture, regulation, and zoning

Thanks for the heads up. This idea of chicken farming (and bee harvesting) is a horrible idea for our community. I don't have a lot of time to dig really deep on this but will take the time if this becomes a looming threat. Chickens require roosters. Roosters crow in the early morning. It would be a disastrous and dirupting idea. Further, because we have spilt rail fences here, our neighbors disaster would quickly be on display.

Raising chickens in a suburban setting imposes unacceptable risks to the stability of a covenant community while inviting a lot of unintended consequences. These include housing them in a way that is congruent with the surrounding community. Lots of unapproved structures can arise that compromises covenant enforcement, foments ill-will within the community, suppresses house values, invites more predators, can spread disease, cause nuisance noises and complaints among neighbors to both homeowner associations, the city, county, and gaming officials. Property destruction of the homeowner as well as surrounding homes will increase. Noise, property damage, garbage and waste disposal, smells that are offensive, inevitable chicken death and disposal, disruption of community peace, increased vandalism, use of bb guns to control the nuisance, strained neighbor relations, reduced property values, and the inevitable return to banning suburban animal/agricultural production are all reasons to forbid chicken (and other animal/agricultural production) from suburban tract communities. This has caused problems in the Denver area already as seen in the Denver Post: https://www.denverpost.com/2013/05/28/backyard-chicken-issues-continue-to-ruffle-feathers- on-front-range/ Here are even some more reasons. 1)Diminishing Production. Hens start laying eggs after about five months. Production, however, wanes at the age of two. Hens can live for well over a decade. Many backyard hen owners are as reluctant to keep a non-productive hen as they are to turn her into chicken soup. The upshot has been a sharp rise in abandoned birds. In 2001, according to the Associated Press, Minneapolis Chicken Run Rescue fielded six calls from individuals looking to find homes for forsaken chickens. By 2012, that number reached almost 500. 2) Commercial Hatcheries. Raising hens in the backyard seems like an obviously humane alternative to factory farming. In some ways, it is. However, on this point, two closely related
Tagged Passions:transportation, property, commercial, vandalism, Gun Control, risk, chickens, agriculture, noise, gun control, Vandalism, and housing

facts should be considered. First, the majority of hens fortunate enough to escape the factory s battery cage hail from the same industrial hatcheries that supply factory farms with millions of birds. This commonality not only undermines any pretense of thinking that backyard birds challenge the industrialized status quo, but it leads to a second problem, namely the fact that the male chicks born in those industrial hatcheries were likely either tossed alive into a grinder or gassed. Male birds are worthless to a hatchery supplying egg farms. Household hens might be glorified, but their cute chicken brothers are treated like trash.

3) Predation. Backyard hens are especially vulnerable to predation. Try this experiment: when you learn that a friend gets backyard hens, check in two months later and ask how things are going. Chances are good that the answer will go something like, great, but . . . . Dogs, cats, snakes, coyotes, possum, hawks, raccoons, raccoons, raccoons. These predators are prevalent and persistent and your poor hens, the ones you have come to love as pets, cannot indulge their natural defense mechanisms (such as finding a low tree limb hidden in dense foliage). They often find themselves trapped in some Ritz-Carleton of a coop that turned out to be less secure than advertised and, in their plush safe havens, are killed in a way that makes the slaughterhouse seem like a day spa by comparison. What killed my chickens? It's an all too common question. And there are currently 23,900 answers being offered on Google GOOG +0.38 . 4) Roosters. There s about a 5 percent chance that your hen will turn out to be a rooster. There are a couple of reasons for this mistake. For one, the sex of a chicken is hard to identify upon birth, even for experts. Many roosters are accidentally identified as hens and shipped to feed stores, the place where urban farmer/hipsters flock to buy their stock. Less innocently, many male birds are tossed into shipping containers as a form of packing material, deployed to prevent the hens from banging into the side of the crate and having their retail value lowered. In any case, urban ordinances that do allow hens are markedly less accepting of roosters, who are more often than not considered poultry non-grata in urban settings.
Tagged Passions:trees, commercial, pets, ordinance, poverty, Google, advertising, chickens, agriculture, and industrial

5) Cost.First-time backyard hen owners are enchanted by the idea of free eggs. Don t be fooled. Build the coop, buy the feed, pay the vet, count the hours spent maintaining the coop and administering care, compensate the neighbor s kid for feeding the hens when you go to the Hamptons for the weekend, and then grab a calculator. The results? As one backyard farmer from Merced, California told an online chicken forum: Don t tell my wife, but I think my eggs are costing about 40 a dozen.

Here are even more costs associated with establishing chicken farming as an approved practice: ouroneacrefarm.com/pros-and-cons-of-backyard-chickens/

Tagged Passions:chickens and agriculture

Here are more problems with backyard chickens: https://nwedible.com/you-absolutely-should- not-get-backyard-chickens/

Here are some observations about beekeeping at the Farm, which I strongly oppose.
Tagged Passions:chickens and agriculture

Most sites will recommend that beekeepers have an acre lot or larger. VERY few will recommend beekeeping at lots less than acre. Most Farm homeowners are at less than acre.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:agriculture and sites

Most beekeeping sites assert that a 6 foot fence be placed around the colony. This presents DRB problems as there are no 6 foot privacy fences at the Farm. Establishing such fences for

beekeeping will cause significant community outrage. Bee Stings The biggest threat that a beehive in the backyard poses is stings by not just one but multiple bees. Bee Allergies Bee stings are bad news for people with bee allergies. In addition to pain and swelling, bee stings result in other symptoms like nausea and vomiting, fainting and closing of the throat in people who are allergic. In the case of a backyard beehive, multiple stings have the potential to kill someone who is extremely allergic to bees. Immediate medical attention is needed if you are stung and you have a bee allergy. Bee Aggression Bees sting as a form of aggression when they feel threatened or if they feel there is a threat to their hive or colony. They also tend to be more aggressive in hot climates, if the hive is located in a shady area or if there is a lack of flowering plants. Keep your distance if you discover a beehive in your backyard. Make sure that children and visitors are also aware of the hive s location, and make they stay away to prevent encounters with aggressive bees. Loud lawnmowers and weed eaters in close proximity to the hive are also known to aggravate bees, causing them to swarm and sting. Beekeeping Precautions

Tagged Passions:plant, agriculture, privacy, sites, and environment

Some bee enthusiasts keep colonies of bees in their backyard to yield fresh honey. The practice of beekeeping is not undertaken lightly. It is important that you know what you are doing, in addition to having the right clothing and equipment. Beekeeping in an urban or suburban area is possible but also dangerous if you do not understand how to keep your bees from becoming a nuisance, and potentially stinging your neighbors. Proper tools and elements of beekeeping include tall fences, to divert bee flight paths over people s heads; a source of clean, fresh water so bees don t go elsewhere to hydrate; and a bait hive, which prevents bees from swarming by giving them a place to reside outside their normal hive. Without the proper knowledge and equipment, backyard beekeeping is a dangerous venture.

Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, equipment, and water

40
people die annually due to bee sting allergy.

https://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/statistics

Tagged Passions:health

2-3 of people have some allergy to bee stings https://forum.honeyflow.com/t/new-bee-to- hives-wondering-true-risk-for-neighbors/697/3

Bees may become aggressive if neighbors make disturbing noise, e.g., mowing their lawns or using weed cutters or leaf blowers.. This presents a nuisance and danger to neighbors of beekeepers. https://forum.honeyflow.com/t/new-bee-to-hives-wondering-true-risk-for-neighbors/697/3 Beekeeping upsets neighbors, can create strained relations in the community, and can increase vandalism in the community. https://grist.org/food/keeping-the-peace-between-beekeepers-and-their-urban-neighbors/ Bee colonies have to be constrained to lot size and have certain architectural constraints that can violate covenant guidelines. Here is a list of concerns: http://www.wakecountybeekeepers.org/wp- content/uploads/2013/10/GoodNeighbor_9OCT2013_JAmbrose.pdf Beekeeping typically requires a 6 foot fence (unacceptable for Farm covenants). In addition, most communities establish lot size requirements for beekeeping. This is often entails larger than a acre size which eliminates most people at the Farm. https://www.keepingbackyardbees.com/how-much-space-does-a-beehive-need/ What happens to the bees in the winter? Where are they stored? Will they find a new warm home in your neighbor s house?
Tagged Passions:commercial, vandalism, risk, agriculture, noise, and Vandalism

https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef606

One HOA prohibited bees, etc. with this language: Animals, livestock, poultry, reptiles, or insects of any kind, regardless of number, shall not be raised, bred or kept on any lot or in common area; except a reasonable number of orderly common household domestic pets may be kept, as long as they are not raised, bred or kept for commercial purposes. New Jersey imposed the following guidelines on keeping bees in the backyard. Note the fence requirement and how that wouldn t work with the Farm community. Here are New Jersey guidelines: A beekeeper should have no more than three hives per lot size of one-quarter acre Colonies should be within 25 feet of a water source, especially during warmer months, March 1 through Oct. 31. Hives should be at least 25 feet from a public area, such as a sidewalk, alley or street Hives shouldn't be within 15 feet of the property lines, but if they fall within 10 feet, the beekeeper should construct a six-foot high solid fence to keep neighbors from interfering with the hives Beekeepers should inspect the hive at least three times between March 1 and Oct. 31. Bee equipment and hives should be kept in good condition, and colonies should be kept in movable frames In sum, beekeeping presents DRB challenges, covenant challenges, safety challenges, community relations challenges, vandalism challenges, bee migration to neighbor homeowner challenges. possibly negative impacts to home values, and nuisance concerns to a typical homeowner maintenance activities that disturb the bees (lawn mowing, weed cutting, leaf blowing, etc.) From: Caitlyn Cahill [mailto:CCahill@arapahoegov.com]
Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, property, streets, commercial, pets, vandalism, Pedestrian, insect, agriculture, livestock, Vandalism, equipment, and water

Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 10:46 AM Subject: Regulation Feedback: Unincorporated Arapahoe County

Hello: You are receiving this email because you are listed as the point of contact in our HOA database for one of the single family Homeowners Associations, within unincorporated Arapahoe County. If you are receiving this email by mistake, please let me know and we will update our records. If you manage multiple HOAs, please provide feedback based on each specific HOA. Arapahoe County has received a number of requests to allow the keeping of backyard chickens and bees in unincorporated suburban areas of Arapahoe County. This year, the Board of County Commissioners asked County staff to research nearby zoning rules and draft a proposed set of regulations for consideration that would allow backyard chickens and bees in Arapahoe County.

Tagged Passions:chickens, regulation, and zoning

Please see the attached letter requesting information from the Homeowners Associations most affected by this potential change in regulations. All email responses should go to zoning@arapahoegov.com and should be provided no later than March 31, 2018.

Thank you, Caitlyn Cahill Zoning Animal Control Manager
Tagged Passions:pets, manager, animal control, regulation, and zoning

6924 South Lima Street, Centennial, CO 80112

Zoning: 720-874-6711 Animal Control: 720-874-6750 Direct: 720-874-6753 ccahill@arapahoegov.com http://www.arapahoegov.com

Tagged Passions:pets, animal control, and zoning

From: Jason Chen To: Zoning Cc: William Chen Subject: Fw: Re: Food Producing Animals (FPA) in unincorporated area of Arapahoe County Date: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 9:18:12 PM

FYI. Sharing with you regarding my research and recommendations for Food Producing Animals. Thanks for the survey (http://bit.ly/beeschickens) and looking forward for it's results after 03/01/2018.
Tagged Passions:zoning

Jason C. Chen, MBA/MS, RTRP Personal Financial Advisor Tax Preparer Chen Insurance Agency, LLC dba Chen Tax Doc Prep Svcs M: +1 (720) 300-0085 F: +1 (303) 734-0215 PO BOX 3475, GREENWD VLG CO 80155-3475, USA

----- Forwarded Message ----- From: Jason Chen To: Commissioners@co.arapahoe.co.us Cc: TKing@co.arapahoe.co.us Sent: Wednesday, February 26, 2014, 2:48:08 PM MST Subject: Re: Food Producing Animals (FPA) in unincorporated area of Arapahoe County Aurora joins chicken-keeping cities like Denver, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins, Lakewood, Centennial and Englewood Hope I soon could harvest our own chicken eggs for breakfast in unincorporated area in Arapahoe County.

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, services, insurance, and finance

Ps. I live on 18132 E Caley Cir, Aurora CO 80016-1174

Jason C. Chen, MBA/MS, RTRP Personal Financial Advisor Tax Preparer Chen Insurance Agency, LLC dba Chen Tax Doc Prep Svcs M: +1 (720) 300-0085 F: +1 (303) 782-6567 PO BOX 3475, ENGLEWOOD CO 80155-3475, USA

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, services, insurance, and finance

On Wednesday, April 10, 2013 1:59 PM, Jason Chen wrote: Dear Ms. Commissioner Sharpe,

May I suggest maximum allowable number of FPA according to the minimum lot size of single- family residential site:

=2.5K sq ft =5K sq ft =10K sq ft =20K sq ft

Eggs Quail and/or Bantam Chicken 4 8 12 16 Chicken and/or duck 2 4 6 8 Goose 1 2 3 4

Milk Pygmy (or other dwarf breeds) Goat 0 0 1 2 Honey Beehive 6 12 24 48 For example a single-family lot size 9,000 sq ft could have combination of eggs producing poultry (ex. 1 goose, 1 duck, 2 quails), 0 pygmy goat and 12 beehives. I think it's more reasonable to limit number of animals according to lot size. This should be more reasonable then the FPA rule came up by City County of Denver (8 fowls 2 goats straight). In addition, I think we could loosen the lot size requirement for goats. We could group houses into neighborhood for goatscaping (using goat for lawn mowing) by anonymous online vote for surrendering household of the applicant. Since we might not switch back to the victory garden (like in
Tagged Passions:neighborhood

WWII when front-yard become farm-yard and backyard become barnyard), why not put those grass clips into good use (to produce milk) and reduce greenhouse gas emissions at same time. If the neighborhood (instead household) concept is favorable then I suggest to have larger size of dairy goats to be more efficient on milk production, lawn mowing and digesting domestic grass.

If the keeping FPA became allowable but require permit and periodically evaluation then I humbly request you to be lighten on members of their local 4-H club. Sincerely yours,
Tagged Passions:agriculture and neighborhood

Jason C. Chen, MBA/MS Chen Insurance Agency, LLC Tel:(720) 300-0085 Fax:(303) 782-6567 POST OFFICE BOX 3475 GRENWD VLG CO 80155-3475

----- Forwarded Message ----- From: Jason Chen To: Tammy King Sent: Tuesday, October 2, 2012 9:18 AM Subject: Re: Food Producing Animals (FPA) in unincorporated area of Arapahoe County Tammy,

Tagged Passions:insurance

Thanks for the info. It sounds loud and clear to me :-) I am surprised to see pot bellied pigs instead of rabbit being listed. Thanks a ton

Jason From: Tammy King To: Jason Chen Sent: Tuesday, October 2, 2012 7:01 AM Subject: RE: Food Producing Animals (FPA) in unincorporated area of Arapahoe County

PETS. Dogs and cats over the age of six months, pot bellied pigs, and reptiles or other small animals of a type typically purchased at local pet stores, which are customarily kept in the home or on the premises for the sole pleasure and enjoyment of the occupants and not raised for commercial purposes. The definition of pets does not include chickens, geese, ducks, turkeys or other poultry or domesticated fowl. Pets that are caged indoors or kept in a terrarium or aquarium or confined in a pond will not be counted in the allowed quantity of pets within a zone district. Keeping of wild or exotic animals as defined by the State of Colorado Division of Wildlife is PROHIBITED. Keeping of any poisonous animal is PROHIBITED. Keeping of any constrictor snake or any reptile with a length greater than three (3) feet, measured from the tip of the nose to the tip of the tail, is PROHIBITED.

Tammy King Zoning Administrator 6924 S Lima Street Centennial, CO 80112 720-874-6711 (fax) 720-874-6611 www.co.arapahoe.co.us From: Jason Chen [mailto:tw_jcc@yahoo.com] Sent: Monday, October 01, 2012 2:11 PM To: Tammy King Subject: Re: Food Producing Animals (FPA) in unincorporated area of Arapahoe County Hi Tammy Happy Monday The following is my address... :-) Jason C. Chen, MBA/MS M:(720) 300-0085 F:(303) 782-6567 18132 E Caley Cir Aurora CO 80016-1174 From: Tammy King To: Jason Chen Sent: Monday, October 1, 2012 6:53 AM Subject: RE: Food Producing Animals (FPA) in unincorporated area of Arapahoe County Good morning What is your address, as there are different requirements depending on how your property is zoned? Tammy King Zoning Administrator 6924 S Lima Street Centennial, CO 80112 720-874-6711 (fax) 720-874-6611 www.co.arapahoe.co.us From: Jason Chen [mailto:tw_jcc@yahoo.com]

Tagged Passions:property, commercial, administrator, pets, purchasing, chickens, and zoning

Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 3:47 PM To: Tammy King Subject: Food Producing Animals (FPA) in unincorporated area of Arapahoe County

Hello Tammy Happy Friday I emailed you back in February and was satisfied with your responses of my question on keeping quails (not caught in wild nor exotic animals listed by Colorado Department of Wildlife) in enclosed/secured container such as cage, coop, and/or pen.

Tagged Passions:pets

I
could find pet info (http://www.co.arapahoe.co.us/Departments/PW/documents/Zoning 20_Card_Pets_FINAL_2011.pdf) but still have yet see any progress on allowing FPA (http://www.denvergov.org/Portals/682/documents/FPA 20Best 20Practices 20Handout 20- 20EV.pdf). Arapahoe County Fair were able to host many exciting 4-H exhibits... so I just hope the county could be more homestead friendly and allow for more 4-H projects selections.

BTW, is there any regulation regarding outdoor pets (ex. dog, cat, rabbit, etc) you could share with me? Thanks Cheerful, Jason C. Chen, MBA/MS M:(720) 300-0085
Tagged Passions:pets, selection, regulation, and zoning

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Caitlyn Cahill From: noreply@civicplus.com Sent: Saturday, May 12, 2018 12:27 PM To: Zoning Subject: Online Form Submittal: Report, Request, Question or Kudo

Categories: Yellow Category Report, Request, Question or Kudo Please complete this form to submit a comment, request or question to Arapahoe County. Notice Written communication to Arapahoe County is considered public information and can be made available to the public upon request. If you would prefer that your comments not become public record, please contact us by phone. Contact Information Full Name Gloria Beilke Email Address gloriabeilke@earthlink.net Phone Number 3037415870 Message Please select the subject of your message: Zoning Question / Comment Question.... my neighbors have a beekeeping house in their backyard which appears to be for honey bees and it backs up to my fence. My backyard is now covered in unwanted bees Which county department do I need to contact to deal with this issue? My address is 5752 S. Havana Court Englewood, CO 80111. Thank you How do you want us to contact you? Please respond to me by email. Exception Communication made through e-mail or any other computer messaging system shall in no way be deemed to constitute legal notice to the County or any of its agencies, officers, employees, agents or representatives with respect to any existing or potential claim or cause of action. No official legal notices may be submitted through our website or email.
Tagged Passions:legal, court, and zoning

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Caitlyn Cahill From: Nancy Jackson Sent: Friday, May 18, 2018 2:33 PM To: jaffe gmail Cc: Caitlyn Cahill Subject: RE: Raising chickens in a residential neighborhood.

Tagged Passions:chickens and neighborhood

Mr. Jaffee, We will make sure that your comments are part of the official record, Best, Nancy j

Nancy Jackson Ph.D. Arapahoe County Commissioner 4 303 795 4859 From: jaffe gmail Sent: Friday, May 18, 2018 12:46 PM To: Nancy Jackson Cc: Kathleen Conti ; Nancy Sharpe ; Jeff Baker ; Bill L. Holen Subject: Raising chickens in a residential neighborhood. Dear Commissioner Jackson: Pursuant to our recent telephone conversations, my wife and I are strongly opposed to having chickens raised in our well-established residential neighborhood of Huntington Estates, Unincorporated Arapahoe County. We have been homeowners in this neighborhood since 1986. Currently our neighbors at 9358 E. Evans Pl., Denver, CO 80231 are raising 7 chickens and their cackling noises are very disturbing, especially in the early morning hours between 6:00am - 7:30am. As you and I discussed, you know they are currently in violation of current zoning laws regarding raising chickens in unincorporated Arapahoe County. I do not feel it is appropriate for this law to be unenforceable because the Commissioners want to wait until they decide if the zoning law will be changed. Why have the law if you are not going to be enforcing it? As my Commissioner, I would expect that, in an established residential neighborhood, you would support your constituents in this matter. If the zoning laws are to be changed, please DO NOT change zoning laws in existing established residential neighborhoods. I can accept zoning changes in the suburban/rural areas of unincorporated Arapahoe County. In the meantime, I expect current zoning laws to be enforced. Thank you for your attention to this matter,

Tagged Passions:chickens, noise, rural, neighborhood, and zoning

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Sincerely,

Alan and Jean Jaffe 9398 E. Evans Pl. Denver, CO 80231 303-751-5748

From: noreply@civicplus.com To: Zoning Subject: Online Form Submittal: Report, Request, Question or Kudo Date: Saturday, May 12, 2018 12:26:46 PM

Report, Request, Question or Kudo Please complete this form to submit a comment, request or question to Arapahoe County. Notice Written communication to Arapahoe County is considered public information and can be made available to the public upon request. If you would prefer that your comments not become public record, please contact us by phone. Contact Information Full Name Gloria Beilke
Tagged Passions:zoning

Email Address gloriabeilke@earthlink.net

Phone Number 3037415870 Message

Please select the subject of your message:

Zoning Question / Comment Question.... my neighbors have a beekeeping house in their backyard which appears to be for honey bees and it backs up to my fence. My backyard is now covered in unwanted bees Which county department do I need to contact to deal with this issue? My address is 5752 S. Havana Court Englewood, CO 80111. Thank you How do you want us to contact you? Please respond to me by email. Exception Communication made through e-mail or any other computer messaging system shall in no way be deemed to constitute legal notice to the County or any of its agencies, officers, employees, agents or representatives with respect to any existing or potential claim or cause of action. No official legal notices may be submitted through our website or email. Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
Tagged Passions:legal, court, and zoning

From: Caitlyn Cahill To: Pulver, Gerald Evan; Zoning Cc: Nancy Jackson Subject: RE: The birds the bees : Survey Date: Thursday, January 25, 2018 9:55:13 AM Attachments: image004.png

image005.png Good Morning Mr. Pulver, Thank you for your feedback regarding our recent research into the topic of beekeeping and chicken ownership within the suburban areas of unincorporated Arapahoe County. If a code rewrite were to be approved to allow chicken keeping, roosters would most likely be restricted, as they are in similar codes throughout the Denver Metro area. The intent of the survey is not to make a decision based on popular vote and we have brought up and discussed the concerns that you mention below. Our intent for this survey is to use it as more of an awareness tool to notify citizens that we are looking into this topic. After the survey, we will continue our research into a possible ordinance change and will work closely with the Board of County Commissioners to ensure that citizens are notified and have their time to express interest or concerns. Please let me know if you have any other questions. Thank you, Caitlyn Cahill Zoning Animal Control Manager 6924 South Lima Street, Centennial, CO 80112 Zoning: 720-874-6711 Animal Control: 720-874-6750 Direct: 720-874-6753 ccahill@arapahoegov.com http://www.arapahoegov.com

Tagged Passions:Public Transit, pets, manager, ordinance, animal control, and zoning

From: Pulver, Gerald Evan [mailto:Gerald.Pulver@ucdenver.edu] Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 7:39 PM To: Zoning Cc: Nancy Jackson Subject: The birds the bees : Survey

Is the Zoning department s survey intended to ask about chickens (gender unspecified) or hens (female) . I expect that there are some folks who wouldn t mind a few hens clucking about their neighbors yards would object to being awakened by roosters. I hope that the County Board of Supervisors is aware that this sort of survey is virtually meaningless because 1) the respondents are self-selecting and 2) it is extremely susceptible to ballot box stuffing. Best regards, Gerald Pulver Gerald Pulver, PhD, MPH Research Assistant ProfessorUniversity of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Family MedicineMail Stop F496 12631 East 17th Avenue Aurora, CO 80045-0508Office: (303) 724-7798

Tagged Passions:education, gender, chickens, election, and zoning

From: Pramit Sanyal To: Michelle Lantz; Zoning; nsharp@arapahoegov.com Subject: Subject: Supporting Zoning for Backyard Chickens and Bee-Keeping Date: Monday, June 4, 2018 11:56:33 AM

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern;

We are writing to express our support in zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County.
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

We are Cherry Creek Vista residents who support our neighbors and community s interest in having backyard chickens and/or bee-keeping. We believe a healthy community is one that allows families to live more sustainably. Raising backyard chickens and bee-keeping are examples of this. We do not see this any differently than responsibly raising dogs or cats. In fact, chickens and bees create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance.

Tagged Passions:pets, chickens, and noise

Many neighboring communities allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping because they recognize the value it brings to their community. Backyard chickens provide fresh eggs, healthy composting and an opportunity to teach children responsibility, empathy for animals and a lesson in where our food comes from. With responsible owners, backyard chickens are wonderful pets and members of the family. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. It s nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable.

We sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee- keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Thank you for your consideration. Pramit Sanyal 5953 South Iola Way Englewood CO 80111
Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, chickens, and zoning

From: tamra white To: Nancy Sharpe; Zoning; Michelle Lantz Subject: Supporting Zoning for Backyard Chickens and Bee-Keeping Date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 3:15:19 PM

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern; I am writing to express my support in zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe county. I am a resident of Fox Hill who support our neighbors and community s interest in having backyard chickens and/or bee-keeping. I believe a healthy community is one that allows families to live more sustainably. Raising backyard chickens and bee-keeping are examples of this. I do not see this any differently than responsibly raising dogs or cats. In fact, chickens and bees create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance. Many neighboring communities to us allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping because they recognize the value it brings to their community. Backyard chickens provide fresh eggs, healthy composting and an opportunity to teach children responsibility, empathy for animals and a lesson in where our food comes from. With responsible owners, backyard chickens are wonderful pets and members of the family. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. It s nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable. I sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Thank you for your consideration. Tamra White 4582 South Gibraltar Street, Centennial, CO 80015

Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, chickens, noise, and zoning

From: Annie Harmon To: Nancy Sharpe; Michelle Lantz; Zoning Subject: Supporting Zoning for Backyard Chickens and Bee-Keeping Date: Monday, June 4, 2018 8:24:28 AM

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern;

We are writing to express our support in zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County.
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

We are Cherry Creek Vista residents who support our neighbors and community s interest in having backyard chickens and/or bee-keeping. We believe a healthy community is one that allows families to live more sustainably. Raising backyard chickens and bee-keeping are examples of this. We do not see this any differently than responsibly raising dogs or cats. In fact, chickens and bees create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance.

Many neighboring communities to us allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping because they recognize the value it brings to their community. Backyard chickens provide fresh eggs, healthy composting and an opportunity to teach children responsibility, empathy for animals and a lesson in where our food comes from. With responsible owners, backyard chickens are wonderful pets and members of the family. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. It s nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable. We sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Thank you for your consideration. Annie and Michael Harmon 5727 S Kenton Street Englewood CO 80111
Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, chickens, noise, and zoning

From: Andrew Kalish To: Michelle Lantz; Zoning Subject: Supporting Zoning for Backyard Chickens and Bee-Keeping Date: Monday, June 4, 2018 9:32:37 AM

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern;

We are writing to express our support in zoning backyard chickens and bee- keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County.
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

We are Cherry Creek Vista residents who support our neighbors and community s interest in having backyard chickens and/or bee-keeping. We believe a healthy community is one that allows families to live more sustainably. Raising backyard chickens and bee-keeping are examples of this. We do not see this any differently than responsibly raising dogs or cats. In fact, chickens and bees create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance.

Many neighboring communities to us allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping because they recognize the value it brings to their community. Backyard chickens provide fresh eggs, healthy composting and an opportunity to teach children responsibility, empathy for animals and a lesson in where our food comes from. With responsible owners, backyard chickens are wonderful pets and members of the family. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. It s nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable. We sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Thank you for your consideration. Andrew Kalish
Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, chickens, noise, and zoning

5984 South Iola Way

Englewood, CO 80111

From: N D To: Michelle Lantz; Zoning; Nancy Sharpe Subject: Supporting Zoning for Backyard Chickens and Bee-Keeping Date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 10:33:05 AM

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern; We are writing to express our support in zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe county. We are residents of South Cherry Creek Vista neighborhood who support our neighbors and community s interest in having backyard chickens and/or bee-keeping. We believe a healthy community is one that allows families to live more sustainably. Raising backyard chickens and bee-keeping are examples of this. We do not see this any differently than responsibly raising dogs or cats. In fact, chickens and bees create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance. Many neighboring communities to us allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping because they recognize the value it brings to their community. Backyard chickens provide fresh eggs, healthy composting and an opportunity to teach children responsibility, empathy for animals and a lesson in where our food comes from. With responsible owners, backyard chickens are wonderful pets and members of the family. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. It s nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable. We sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Thank you for your consideration. Nicole Dais 10663 E Dorado Ave Englewood, CO 80111

Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, chickens, noise, neighborhood, and zoning

From: Steve To: Zoning Subject: The allowing of chickens in rural Arapahoe County Date: Monday, March 5, 2018 9:43:32 AM

Tagged Passions:chickens, rural, and zoning

To whom it may concern, I am in favor of allowing chickens. There are many benefits to residents of Arapahow if backyard chickens are allowed. Thanks for your consideration. Best regards, Steve Tokarski

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:chickens

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Caitlyn Cahill From: PCMS Corp Office Sent: Wednesday, March 28, 2018 12:43 PM To: Zoning Cc: Caitlyn Cahill Subject: FW: FW: Regulation Feedback: Unincorporated Arapahoe County

Caitlyn Please see comments below from a resident at The Farm at Arapahoe County Homeowners Association. Thank you Jessica Moser PCMS
Tagged Passions:agriculture, regulation, and zoning

Thanks for the heads up. This idea of chicken farming (and bee harvesting) is a horrible idea for our community. I don't have a lot of time to dig really deep on this but will take the time if this becomes a looming threat. Chickens require roosters. Roosters crow in the early morning. It would be a disastrous and dirupting idea. Further, because we have spilt rail fences here, our neighbors disaster would quickly be on display. Raising chickens in a suburban setting imposes unacceptable risks to the stability of a covenant community while inviting a lot of unintended consequences. These include housing them in a way that is congruent with the surrounding community. Lots of unapproved structures can arise that compromises covenant enforcement, foments ill-will within the community, suppresses house values, invites more predators, can spread disease, cause nuisance noises and complaints among neighbors to both homeowner associations, the city, county, and gaming officials. Property destruction of the homeowner as well as surrounding homes will increase. Noise, property damage, garbage and waste disposal, smells that are offensive, inevitable chicken death and disposal, disruption of community peace, increased vandalism, use of bb guns to control the nuisance, strained neighbor relations, reduced property values, and the inevitable return to banning suburban animal/agricultural production are all reasons to forbid chicken (and other animal/agricultural production) from suburban tract communities. This has caused problems in the Denver area already as seen in the Denver Post: https://www.denverpost.com/2013/05/28/backyard-chicken-issues-continue-to-ruffle-feathers-on-front-range/ Here are even some more reasons. 1)Diminishing Production. Hens start laying eggs after about five months. Production, however, wanes at the age of two. Hens can live for well over a decade. Many backyard hen owners are as reluctant to keep a non- productive hen as they are to turn her into chicken soup. The upshot has been a sharp rise in abandoned birds. In 2001, according to the Associated Press, Minneapolis Chicken Run Rescue fielded six calls from individuals looking to find homes for forsaken chickens. By 2012, that number reached almost 500. 2) Commercial Hatcheries. Raising hens in the backyard seems like an obviously humane alternative to factory farming. In some ways, it is. However, on this point, two closely related facts should be considered. First, the majority of hens fortunate enough to escape the factory s battery cage hail from the same industrial hatcheries that supply factory farms with millions of birds. This commonality not only undermines any pretense of thinking that backyard birds challenge the industrialized status quo, but it leads to a second problem, namely the fact that the male chicks born in those industrial hatcheries were likely either tossed alive into a grinder or

Tagged Passions:transportation, property, commercial, vandalism, Gun Control, risk, chickens, agriculture, noise, gun control, Vandalism, industrial, and housing

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gassed. Male birds are worthless to a hatchery supplying egg farms. Household hens might be glorified, but their cute chicken brothers are treated like trash. 3) Predation. Backyard hens are especially vulnerable to predation. Try this experiment: when you learn that a friend gets backyard hens, check in two months later and ask how things are going. Chances are good that the answer will go something like, great, but . . . . Dogs, cats, snakes, coyotes, possum, hawks, raccoons, raccoons, raccoons. These predators are prevalent and persistent and your poor hens, the ones you have come to love as pets, cannot indulge their natural defense mechanisms (such as finding a low tree limb hidden in dense foliage). They often find themselves trapped in some Ritz-Carleton of a coop that turned out to be less secure than advertised and, in their plush safe havens, are killed in a way that makes the slaughterhouse seem like a day spa by comparison. What killed my chickens? It's an all too common question. And there are currently 23,900 answers being offered on Google GOOG +0.38 . 4) Roosters. There s about a 5 percent chance that your hen will turn out to be a rooster. There are a couple of reasons for this mistake. For one, the sex of a chicken is hard to identify upon birth, even for experts. Many roosters are accidentally identified as hens and shipped to feed stores, the place where urban farmer/hipsters flock to buy their stock. Less innocently, many male birds are tossed into shipping containers as a form of packing material, deployed to prevent the hens from banging into the side of the crate and having their retail value lowered. In any case, urban ordinances that do allow hens are markedly less accepting of roosters, who are more often than not considered poultry non-grata in urban settings. 5) Cost.First-time backyard hen owners are enchanted by the idea of free eggs. Don t be fooled. Build the coop, buy the feed, pay the vet, count the hours spent maintaining the coop and administering care, compensate the neighbor s kid for feeding the hens when you go to the Hamptons for the weekend, and then grab a calculator. The results? As one backyard farmer from Merced, California told an online chicken forum: Don t tell my wife, but I think my eggs are costing about 40 a dozen. Here are even more costs associated with establishing chicken farming as an approved practice: ouroneacrefarm.com/pros-and-cons-of-backyard-chickens/ Here are more problems with backyard chickens: https://nwedible.com/you-absolutely-should-not-get- backyard-chickens/

Here are some observations about beekeeping at the Farm, which I strongly oppose. Most sites will recommend that beekeepers have an acre lot or larger. VERY few will recommend beekeeping at lots less than acre. Most Farm homeowners are at less than acre. Most beekeeping sites assert that a 6 foot fence be placed around the colony. This presents DRB problems as there are no 6 foot privacy fences at the Farm. Establishing such fences for beekeeping will cause significant community outrage. Bee Stings The biggest threat that a beehive in the backyard poses is stings by not just one but multiple bees. Bee Allergies
Tagged Passions:trees, commercial, pets, ordinance, poverty, Google, advertising, chickens, agriculture, privacy, and sites

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Bee stings are bad news for people with bee allergies. In addition to pain and swelling, bee stings result in other symptoms like nausea and vomiting, fainting and closing of the throat in people who are allergic. In the case of a backyard beehive, multiple stings have the potential to kill someone who is extremely allergic to bees. Immediate medical attention is needed if you are stung and you have a bee allergy. Bee Aggression Bees sting as a form of aggression when they feel threatened or if they feel there is a threat to their hive or colony. They also tend to be more aggressive in hot climates, if the hive is located in a shady area or if there is a lack of flowering plants. Keep your distance if you discover a beehive in your backyard. Make sure that children and visitors are also aware of the hive s location, and make they stay away to prevent encounters with aggressive bees. Loud lawnmowers and weed eaters in close proximity to the hive are also known to aggravate bees, causing them to swarm and sting. Beekeeping Precautions Some bee enthusiasts keep colonies of bees in their backyard to yield fresh honey. The practice of beekeeping is not undertaken lightly. It is important that you know what you are doing, in addition to having the right clothing and equipment. Beekeeping in an urban or suburban area is possible but also dangerous if you do not understand how to keep your bees from becoming a nuisance, and potentially stinging your neighbors. Proper tools and elements of beekeeping include tall fences, to divert bee flight paths over people s heads; a source of clean, fresh water so bees don t go elsewhere to hydrate; and a bait hive, which prevents bees from swarming by giving them a place to reside outside their normal hive. Without the proper knowledge and equipment, backyard beekeeping is a dangerous venture. 40 people die annually due to bee sting allergy. https://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/statistics 2-3 of people have some allergy to bee stings https://forum.honeyflow.com/t/new-bee-to-hives-wondering- true-risk-for-neighbors/697/3 Bees may become aggressive if neighbors make disturbing noise, e.g., mowing their lawns or using weed cutters or leaf blowers.. This presents a nuisance and danger to neighbors of beekeepers. https://forum.honeyflow.com/t/new-bee-to-hives-wondering-true-risk-for-neighbors/697/3 Beekeeping upsets neighbors, can create strained relations in the community, and can increase vandalism in the community. https://grist.org/food/keeping-the-peace-between-beekeepers-and-their-urban-neighbors/ Bee colonies have to be constrained to lot size and have certain architectural constraints that can violate covenant guidelines. Here is a list of concerns: http://www.wakecountybeekeepers.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/GoodNeighbor_9OCT2013_JAmbrose.pdf Beekeeping typically requires a 6 foot fence (unacceptable for Farm covenants). In addition, most communities establish lot size requirements for beekeeping. This is often entails larger than a acre size which eliminates most people at the Farm.

Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, plant, health, vandalism, risk, agriculture, noise, Vandalism, equipment, water, and environment

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https://www.keepingbackyardbees.com/how-much-space-does-a-beehive-need/ What happens to the bees in the winter? Where are they stored? Will they find a new warm home in your neighbor s house? https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef606 One HOA prohibited bees, etc. with this language: Animals, livestock, poultry, reptiles, or insects of any kind, regardless of number, shall not be raised, bred or kept on any lot or in common area; except a reasonable number of orderly common household domestic pets may be kept, as long as they are not raised, bred or kept for commercial purposes. New Jersey imposed the following guidelines on keeping bees in the backyard. Note the fence requirement and how that wouldn t work with the Farm community. Here are New Jersey guidelines:

A beekeeper should have no more than three hives per lot size of one quarter acre Colonies should be within 25 feet of a water source, especially during warmer months, March 1 through Oct. 31. Hives should be at least 25 feet from a public area, such as a sidewalk, alley or street Hives shouldn't be within 15 feet of the property lines, but if they fall within 10 feet, the beekeeper should construct a six foot high solid fence to keep neighbors from interfering with the hives Beekeepers should inspect the hive at least three times between March 1 and Oct. 31. Bee equipment and hives should be kept in good condition, and colonies should be kept in movable frames In sum, beekeeping presents DRB challenges, covenant challenges, safety challenges, community relations challenges, vandalism challenges, bee migration to neighbor homeowner challenges. possibly negative impacts to home values, and nuisance concerns to a typical homeowner maintenance activities that disturb the bees (lawn mowing, weed cutting, leaf blowing, etc.) From: Caitlyn Cahill [mailto:CCahill@arapahoegov.com] Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 10:46 AM Subject: Regulation Feedback: Unincorporated Arapahoe County Hello: You are receiving this email because you are listed as the point of contact in our HOA database for one of the single family Homeowners Associations, within unincorporated Arapahoe County. If you are receiving this email by mistake, please let me know and we will update our records. If you manage multiple HOAs, please provide feedback based on each specific HOA. Arapahoe County has received a number of requests to allow the keeping of backyard chickens and bees in unincorporated suburban areas of Arapahoe County. This year, the Board of County Commissioners asked County staff to research nearby zoning rules and draft a proposed set of regulations for consideration that would allow backyard chickens and bees in Arapahoe County. Please see the attached letter requesting information from the Homeowners Associations most affected by this potential change in regulations. All email responses should go to zoning@arapahoegov.com and should be provided no later than March 31, 2018.

Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, property, commercial, pets, vandalism, Pedestrian, insect, chickens, agriculture, livestock, Vandalism, equipment, regulation, water, and zoning

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Thank you, Caitlyn Cahill Zoning Animal Control Manager 6924 South Lima Street, Centennial, CO 80112 Zoning: 720 874 6711 Animal Control: 720 874 6750 Direct: 720 874 6753 ccahill@arapahoegov.com http://www.arapahoegov.com

Tagged Passions:pets, manager, animal control, and zoning

From: cajunpoet@comcast.net To: Zoning Subject: Urban chickens Date: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 8:48:12 PM

First the county board of commissioners disregards the Planning Commission, the Arapahoe County staff and the zoning committee and rams high density urban development right into a residential neighborhood. Now they want to consider urban chickens? Unincorporated Arapahoe county has been dumped on already, send the chickens to Greenwood Village. Frank Lloyd Kramer 303 394 1187 res. 303 520 6131 cell
Tagged Passions:telecommunications, boards and commissions, Telecommunications, development, chickens, Comcast, planning, Development, neighborhood, and zoning

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Caitlyn Cahill From: colsumberg@aol.com Sent: Wednesday, March 21, 2018 6:53 PM To: Caitlyn Cahill Subject: chickens and bees

I don't believe our residential area is the proper place to raise chicken and bees. William Sumberg Huntington Estates resident Arapahoe County
Tagged Passions:chickens

From: Joel Asrael To: Nancy Sharpe; Michelle Lantz; Zoning Cc: Jill T Asrael Subject: Zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Date: Friday, May 25, 2018 12:55:07 PM

Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern;

We are writing to express our strong support in zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County.
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

We are Cherry Creek Vista South residents who are sincerely interested in living more sustainably, healthfully and knowledgeable about where our food comes from. We believe one way to live more sustainably is to produce some of our own food. Not only will chickens provide us with healthy eggs, but responsible composting will provide a healthy vegetable garden. And, our children will learn about responsibility and empathy for animals, as well as the process of where our food comes from.

The benefits of bee-keeping are also far-reaching. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. Its nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable. We are dismayed, that because we live in unincorporated Arapahoe County, we cannot keep a few hens in our backyard or support our neighbors who want to improve our eco-system with bee-keeping. This, even though many neighboring areas allow this. And across the nation, many cities and suburbs are revising their laws to allow for backyard chickens and bee- keeping.
Tagged Passions:chickens

A
small backyard flock of four or five hens is no more inherently an agricultural operation than are a couple of dogs and is likely to create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance to the neighbors. The average backyard flock of three to six hens requires less room and is a lot less aggravating to any neighbor who allows their dogs access to the backyard.

Having responsibly raised backyard chickens, we believe the concerns raised by individuals and HOA s are unfounded. Hens make little noise, can be as clean and bug-free as their owners choose to keep their space, and do not attract rodents if food and water are protected during the nighttime hours. And, they can be placed in spaces that do not infringe upon neighbor s enjoyment of their home. There is also research showing that zoning for backyard chickens does not affect home values or make the neighborhood less appealing. In fact, surveys show that many people, especially younger families, like to see chickens in yards because it shows that the neighborhood is young and both environmentally and health-conscious. We sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee- keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Thank you for your consideration. Joel and Jill Asrael 5954 S Iola Way Englewood CO 80111
Tagged Passions:Utility, utility, health, pets, chickens, agriculture, noise, water, neighborhood, and zoning

Sent from Outlook

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Caitlyn Cahill From: Kristi Stanlis Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2018 9:09 AM To: Michelle Lantz; Zoning; Nancy Sharpe Subject: Chickens, please

Categories: Yellow Category
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

To Whom This May Concern; I am writing to express my support in zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe county. I am a resident of Willow Trace who support my neighbors' and community s interest in having backyard chickens and/or bee-keeping. I believe a healthy community is one that allows families to live more sustainably. Raising backyard chickens and bee-keeping are examples of this. I do not see this any differently than responsibly raising dogs or cats. In fact, chickens and bees create far less noise, smell, waste, and annoyance. Many neighboring communities to me allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping because they recognize the value it brings to their community. Backyard chickens provide fresh eggs, healthy composting and an opportunity to teach children responsibility, empathy for animals and a lesson in where our food comes from. With responsible owners, backyard chickens are wonderful pets and members of the family. Bee-keeping offers rewards far beyond harvesting honey and increasing pollination for a beautiful garden. It s nectar-gathering impact extends into the community allowing them to pollinate an extended area. This pollination helps the ecosystem remain diverse and sustainable. I sincerely hope you will move forward with zoning to allow backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Also, some guidance in dealing with the nearly impossible to alter HOA covenants would be helpful. Thank you for your consideration. Kristi Stanlis 20579 E. Saratoga Pl Aurora, CO 80015

Tagged Passions:pets, recognition, chickens, noise, and zoning

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Caitlyn Cahill From: Kairee Tormoehlen Sent: Thursday, June 7, 2018 9:18 AM To: Nancy Sharpe; Michelle Lantz; Zoning Subject: Residential Bee Keeping and Backyard Chickens

Hello, I am writing to express my concern regarding zoning backyard chickens and bee-keeping in unincorporated Arapahoe County. I live in Cherry Creek Vista and am concerned about neighbors harvesting bees and chickens. Chickens will attract wildlife, including coyotes further and as a mother of young children, I would appreciate less bait in our neighborhood. Our backyards are small, so one neighbor choosing to start a farm, decreases the value and safety of the neighborhood. My family sincerely hopes you consider this request when reviewing zoning for beekeeping and backyard chickens. Thank you, Kairee Tormoehlen 6039 S Jamaica Cir Englewood, CO 80111 BoCC Study Session June 6, 2018 Page 1 of 2 Board Summary Report
Tagged Passions:chickens, agriculture, neighborhood, and zoning

Date: June 6, 2018

No additional detail provided

To: Board of County Commissioners

From: George Brauchler, District Attorney

Tagged Passions:legal

Subject: Marijuana Enforcement Grant Program

Purpose and Recommendation The purpose of this study session is to update the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) on 2018 activities of the Office and to discuss the filing process for the Grey and Black Market Marijuana Grant. We anticipate the grant application process to be a reoccurring process throughout 2018.
Tagged Passions:marijuana, market, drugs, grant, and program

Background Request: The Office of the District Attorney is asking for assistance in applying for the Grey and Black Market Marijuana Grant Program established by (C.R.S 24-32-119). The grant is administered by the Department of Local Affairs, State of Colorado and only counties and municipalities can apply. The DA s Office must apply through one of our counties as set by the Statute.

History: This is our third application with DOLA for reimbursement grants related to marijuana. We were awarded 280,000. The latest application is for an additional 55,000. This funding is used to support operations across the 18th, and not just Arapahoe County. DOLA has approved our accounting records, calculations, and supporting documentation as previously submitted.
Tagged Passions:legal, marijuana, funding, market, drugs, grant, program, and history

County Impact: The County would only be required to receive a single check or ACH, prepare a budget supplemental and verify the accounting documentation on our behalf. As part of the application, the DA s office sends the accounting documentation to the State for approval. We will provide all of the accounting records required.

Tagged Passions:budget

Benefits: These grant awards supplement our county budget request. This funding will allow the Office to pursue additional operational needs unforeseen at the time of our annual budget submission.

Why Arapahoe: We previously applied for the Marijuana Impact Grant through your administration. Everyone is now familiar with how the grant works, making this the most efficient path for application and administration. We initially applied with Elbert County, because they incurred significant expenses in a joint investigation and were also applying for reimbursement.

Tagged Passions:budget, marijuana, funding, drugs, and grant

Discussion The presentation will include a discussion on our marijuana investigations and prosecution in 2018 and beyond.

BoCC Study Session June 6, 2018 Page 2 of 2
Tagged Passions:marijuana and drugs

Fiscal Impact There is 6,000,000 set aside annually for reimbursement. Currently, we estimate a minimum of 2000 hours ( 80,000) of additional casework incurred by July 31st, eligible for future reimbursement under this grant. We also have 2 murder cases and one large drug trafficking organization case that will be eligible in future periods.

BSR for review for by June 7, 2018 Presenting Survey Results (attached reference document): Complete a brief overview and explanation of the survey completed early 2018 and discuss the results. Requesting Direction: To evaluate citizen feedback regarding a request to allow bee-keeping and chickens on Residential zoned properties (in back yards of homes) in unincorporated Arapahoe County. Request and Recommendation Background Discussion Benefits/Concerns Attachment Alternatives Fiscal Impact
Tagged Passions:chickens, drugs, grant, and zoning

chicken_bees_surveyresults BSR for review for December 4, 2017 Requesting Direction: To evaluate a citizen-based request to allowing bee-keeping and chickens on Residential zoned properties (in back yards of homes) in unincorporated Arapahoe County Request and Recommendation Background Discussion Benefits/Concerns Attachment Alternatives Fiscal Impact ADAMS COUNTY Chickens and Bee Keeping

DOUGLAS COUNTY Chickens JEFFERSON COUNTY Chickens
Tagged Passions:chickens and zoning

CITY OF BRIGHTON Chickens Bee Keeping

Tagged Passions:chickens

CITY OF ENGLEWOOD CITY OF DENVER Bee Keeping

CITY OF LITTLETON CITY OF CENTENNIAL Chickens

Tagged Passions:chickens

CITY OF AURORA Chickens Bee Keeping

Tagged Passions:chickens

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