CA - Los Angeles: SPECIAL MEETING - RULES, ELECTIONS, AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS COMMITTEE

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SPECIAL MEETING - RULES, ELECTIONS, AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS COMMITTEE

Called by Committee Chair

SPECIAL MEETING - RULES, ELECTIONS, AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS COMMITTEE

Tagged Passions:intergovernmental, voting, and election

Friday, September 21, 2018

JOHN FERRARO COUNCIL CHAMBER, ROOM 340, CITY HALL - 8:30 AM

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200 NORTH SPRING STREET, LOS ANGELES, CA 90012

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MEMBERS: COUNCILMEMBER HERB J. WESSON, JR., CHAIR COUNCILMEMBER JOSE HUIZAR COUNCILMEMBER MARQUEECE HARRIS-DAWSON

(Richard Williams - Legislative Assistant - (213) 978-1071 or email richard.williams@lacity.org)

Click here for agenda packets

Note: For information regarding the Committee and its operations, please contact the Committee Legislative Assistant at the phone number and/or email

address listed above. The Legislative Assistant may answer questions and provide materials and notice of matters scheduled before the City Council. Sign Language Interpreters, Communication Access Real-Time Transcription (CART), Assistive Listening Devices, or other auxiliary aids and/or services may be provided upon request. To ensure availability, you are advised to make your request at least 72 hours prior to the meeting/event you wish to attend. Due to difficulties in securing Sign Language Interpreters, five or more business days notice is strongly recommended. For additional information, please contact the Legislative Assistant listed above.
Tagged Passions:council, business, services, materials, and events

MULTIPLE AGENDA ITEM COMMENT

GENERAL PUBLIC COMMENT

ITEM NO. (1) 18-0447

Motion (Wesson - Ryu) relative to an invitation to Mr. Dean Logan, the Los Angeles County (County) Registrar-Recorder / County Clerk, to provide an

update on the County's Voting Solutions for All People Project and to discuss vote center placement.
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Community Impact Statement: None submitted.

ITEM NO. (2) 15-1088-S1

Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 1

Motion (Ryu - Krekorian - Buscaino - Koretz) relative to a request to the City Ethics Commission to draft an ordinance and report on the implications

of increasing the matching funds rate in both primary and general elections for all candidates who qualify for matching funds, and report on whether the maximum per-contribution matches in Section. 49.7.27 of the Campaign Finance Ordinance should be revised to cap matches at lower levels; and, an instruction to the City Administrative Officer to report on the impacts these changes may have on the City's General Fund.
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, ordinance, campaign finance, voting, ethics, instruction, funding, election, and finance

Community Impact Statement: Yes.

For: Glassell Park Neighborhood Council Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council Historic Highland Park Neighborhood Council

Tagged Passions:council, parks, downtown, neighborhood, and historic

ITEM NO. (3) 12-1269-S5

City Ethics Commission (CEC) report and City Attorney report and Ordinance relative to amending the Los Angeles Municipal Code to revise Matching

Fund Regulations; and consideration of CEC proposed amendments to the Campaign Finance Ordinance regarding the Matching Funds Program. (TIME LIMIT FILE - OCTOBER 20, 2018; LAST DAY FOR COUNCIL ACTION - OCTOBER 19, 2018)
Tagged Passions:council, boards and commissions, legal, ordinance, campaign finance, ethics, regulation, funding, program, and finance

Fiscal Impact Statement Submitted: No. Community Impact Statement: None submitted.

ITEM NO. (4) 18-0002-S120

Resolution (Wesson - Ryu - O'Farrell), and Chief Legislative Analyst (CLA) to report, relative to including in the City's 2017-18 State Legislative

Program, support for Proposition 4, the Children s Hospital Bonds Initiative, which would authorize 1.5 billion in bonds for the construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of children s hospitals in California.
Tagged Passions:expansion, hospital, program, healthcare, construction, and bond

Community Impact Statement: None submitted.

ITEM NO. (5) 18-0002-S109

Resolution (Wesson - Koretz), and CLA report, relative to including in the City's 2017-18 Federal Legislative Program, support for HR 6043 (Joyce)

and S. 3032 (Warren), the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act, which would allow state governments to enforce their marijuana laws without undue federal intervention.
Tagged Passions:marijuana, program, and drugs

Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 2

Community Impact Statement: None submitted.

ITEM NO. (6) 18-1100

City Clerk and City Attorney reports, Resolution, and Ordinance calling a special election on March 5, 2019, and a Special Runoff Election, if

necessary, on May 14, 2019, for the purpose of filling a vacancy in the Fifth District of the Board of Education of the Los Angeles Unified School District.
Tagged Passions:legal, education, ordinance, voting, and election

Community Impact Statement: None submitted.

If you challenge this Committee's action(s) in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public

hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Clerk at or prior to, the public hearing. Any written correspondence delivered to the City Clerk before the City Council's final action on a matter will become a part of the administrative record.
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Materials relative to items on this agenda can be obtained from the Office of the City Clerk's Council File Management System, at lacouncilfile.com

by entering the Council File number listed immediately following the item number (e.g., 00-0000).
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Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 3

RULES, ELECTIONS S INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS

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MOTION

Beginning in March 2020, the City of Los Angeles will consolidate its municipal elections with Los Angeles County. These consolidated elections will

differ significantly from prior elections due to SB 450 and the County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk s (LA CC/RR) implementation of the Vote Center Model.
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Vote centers will replace polling places and will be open for ten days leading up to, and including, election day. From ten days to four days before

the election, there will be one vote center for every 30,000 registered voters within Los Angeles County (which currently has approximately 5,130,957 active registered voters); approximately 171 vote centers. For the remaining three days, including election day, there will be one vote center for every 7,500 registered voters, approximately 700 vote centers throughout the County.
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The City s voters are accustomed to having convenient, local polling places; on average, the City Clerk provides 1,000 polling locations throughout

the City. The number of voting locations for the City will decrease dramatically as the LA CC/RR will need to distribute 171 voting centers (ten to four days out from Election Day) and 700 voting centers (three days out to Election Day) among multiple cities in a large geographic area.
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As prescribes by SB 450, selection of voting locations will involve a great deal of community input and will include many factors, such as

accessibility, proximity to public transit, security, and convenience. The LA CC/RR has contracted with PlaceWorks to facilitate the Vote Center Placement Project (VCPP). They will seek input from the community, participating jurisdictions, community based organizations, and universities, to name some of the participants. After gathering input and conducting assessments, the company will identify and select the vote center locations. Community meetings are scheduled to begin this summer and continue into 2019.
Tagged Passions:Public Transit, contract, voting, selection, and security

The voter experience is going to change dramatically and the City should be prepared to weigh in on decision making with as much information as

possible. Our understanding of the new processes will help in educating and preparing our voters as well.

I THEREFORE MOVE that the City Council invite Dean Logan, the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/ County Clerk, to provide an update on the County

s Voting Solutions for All People (VSAP) Project and discuss vote center placement.
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1PRESENTED BY HERB J. WESSON, Jr. Councilmember, 10lh District C )

m I

2: isc

ITEM NO. 1

Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 4

RULES, ELECTIONS S INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS MOTION

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Since the 2010 Supreme Court ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the amount of money being spent to influence political

campaigns has sharply increased. Absent a new court ruling, or a constitutional amendment, the City has limited authority to regulate outside spending from moneyed special interests. One of the most effective counterbalances to this unregulated and unaccountable spending, would be to increase the influence of small dollar donations by increasing the rate at which the city provides public matching funds.
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, legal, Donation, voting, funding, election, court, and donation

The Los Angeles City Ethics Commission previously submitted a slate of campaign finance reform recommendations in 2014, and, in a more detailed 2015

report, recommended increased matching funds rates for City elections, due to the surplus in the Matching Funds Trust Fund.
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, campaign finance, surplus, rates, voting, ethics, funding, election, and finance

The Matching Funds Trust Fund, as envisioned in the City Charter, is intended to reduce the power of moneyed special interests in elections by

ensuring qualified candidates will receive enough funding, through public financing, to allow their voices to be heard. At our current rates of match, public funding is not bolstering small dollar donors at the level necessary to ensure qualified candidates can get their message to voters, and the Matching Funds Trust Fund is being replenished at a rate significantly faster than it is being used.
Tagged Passions:rates, voting, funding, and election

WE THEREFORE MOVE that the Ethics Commission be requested to prepare and present an ordinance and report on the implications of increasing the

matching fund rates from the current 2:1 match in primary elections and 4:1 match in general elections to 6:1 in both primary elections and general elections for all candidates who qualify for matching funds.
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, ordinance, rates, voting, ethics, funding, and election

WE FURTHER MOVE that the Ethics Commission be requested to report on whether the maximum per-contribution matches in Sec. 49.7.27 of the Campaign

Finance Ordinance should be revised to cap matches at lower levels, such as 100.
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WE FURTHER MOVE that the City Administrative Officer be directed to report back on any impacts these changes may have on the City s general fund. /

Q e-ciL DAVID RYU

CO-PRESENTED BY CO-PRESENTED BY

PAUL KREKORIAN

Councilmember, 2nd DistrictCouncilmember, 4th District

s

CO-PRESENTED BY SECONDED BY

JOE BUSCAINO

Councilmember, 15 th District

JANIOXD

ITEM NO. 2

Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 5

s i SJ

Los Angeles City Ethics Commission

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August 30, 2018

The Honorable City Council c/o Holly Wolcott, City Clerk 200 North Spring Street City Hall - 3rd Floor Los Angeles CA 90012

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Re: Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws FOR COUNCIL CONSIDERATION

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Dear Councilmembers:

On August 21, 2018, after six months of detailed review and discussion, the Ethics Commission unanimously approved recommendations to amend certain

aspects of the City s campaign finance laws. Six recommendations apply to candidates who participate in the matching funds program, and two apply to all City candidates.
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The recommendations are summarized in the tables on pages 3 and 4. They are discussed in more detail below in Sections B and C, beginning on the

following pages.

Matching Funds Program Page

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Collecting In-district Contributions.. Identifying In-district Contributions. Debates............................................. Match Rate /

Signature Requirement Maximum Funding Per Candidate.... Qualified Contributions...................
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6 8 8 9

11 14

Other Campaign Finance Laws Page

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Contributor Certification.......................... Aggregate Per-person Contribution Limit

14 15

The recommended changes to ordinance language are provided in Attachment E (clean version) and Attachment F (redline version). Additional detail,

including written public com ments, can also be found in the staff reports for the Ethics Commission meetings in February, April, June, and August of 2018. The staff reports are online at ethics.lacity.org/meetings/ archives/.
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200 North Spring Street, Suite 2410 Los Angeles CA 90012 phone (213) 978-1960 fax (213) 978-1988 ethics.lacity.org

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ITEM NO. 3

Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 6

The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 2 of 16

A. BACKGROUND

1. Rationale

Several factors led to this review. First, the voters adopted a change to the City s election cycle, which will move City elections to even-numbered

years. The first of these elections will be held in 2020, and there is some uncertainty about the ability of City candidates to raise sufficient campaign funds when competing with state and federal candidates.
Tagged Passions:voting, funding, and election

Second, the 2015 and 2017 elections represent the first complete election cycle to fully incorporate the current requirements of the matching funds

program. As a result, data regarding the existing program is now available for analysis. Finally, the review addresses two City Council motions that were introduced last year regarding the matching funds program. See Council File Nos. 15-1088-S1, 17-0058.
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2. Process

As with every Ethics Commission policy review, these recommendations reflect many months of discussion across disciplines within the agency. The

Ethics Commission has analyzed data, considered previous recommendations, evaluated experiences with the existing program, and examined laws in other jurisdictions. More information about the jurisdictions surveyed in this review is provided in Attachment A.
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The Ethics Commission has also actively engaged the public in this review. Input was solicited via emails, website postings, an interested persons

meeting, and one-on-one meetings with a variety of interested parties. In response, the Ethics Commission received and considered extensive public feedback.
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The Ethics Commission s recommendations affect both the Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) and regulations in the Los Angeles Administrative Code

(LAAC). The Los Angeles City Charter (Charter) establishes specific procedures for regulations adopted by the Ethics Commission. The regulations are subject to City Council approval but cannot be modified. Charter 703(a). In addition, a public hearing must be held, and action to approve or disapprove must be taken within 60 days of the date the Ethics Commission adopts the recommendations. Charter 703(b). The Ethics Commission adopted the recommendations on August 21, 2018; and the 60-day deadline is, therefore, October 19, 2018.
Tagged Passions:council, boards and commissions, hearing, ethics, regulation, and procedure

3. Summary

As a result of its review process, the Ethics Commission recommends the eight amendments summarized in the three tables that begin on the next page.

The Ethics Commission does not recommend changes to any other aspect of the campaign finance laws at this time.
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Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 7

The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 3 of 16

MATCHING FUNDS QUALIFICATION CRITERIA RecommendationCitation Current LawTopic

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LAMC 49.7.23(C)(2) LAAC 24.32(b)(2)(C)

In-District Contributions (collecting)

Qualified contributions must be received from at least 200 residents of the Council district or, for Citywide candidates, the City.

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Qualified contributions must be received from at least 100 residents of the Council district or, for Citywide candidates, the City.

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LAAC 24.32(b)(2)(A)(iii)In-District Contributions (identifying)

In-district contributions must be listed separately on a request for qualification.

A separate list of in-district contributions is not required on a request for qualification.

LAMC 49.7.23(C)(6) LAAC 24.32(a)(3)(B) LAAC 24.31(b)(11) [proposed]

Debates A candidate must simply agree to participate in one debate with opponents in the primary election and two debates with the opponent in the

general election.
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A candidate must actually participate in a debate or a town hall meeting (a public event at which questions may be asked of the candidate) in the

primary election.
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LAMC 49.7.2(T)Qualified Contributions

The earliest a candidate may accept a qualified contribution is listed separately for primary and general elections, and different language is used

even though the date is the same.
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The earliest a candidate may accept a qualified contribution is the same for both primary and general elections (the date the candidate files a

Declaration of Intent to Solicit and Receive Contributions for that election).
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MATCHING FUNDS MATCH RATE FUNDING RecommendationCitation Current LawTopic

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LAMC 49.7.27(B)Match Rate Signature Requirement

Qualified candidates who collect 500 valid signatures during the nominating petition process receive a match rate of 1:1 in the primary and the

general. Qualified candidates who collect 1,000 valid signatures receive a match rate of 2:1 in the primary and 4:1 in the general.

The signature requirement is eliminated, and all qualified candidates receive a match rate of 6:1 in the primary and the general.

Maximum Funding Per Candidate

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LAMC 49.7.29 The maximum public funding a qualified candidate can receive has never been adjusted for CPI and is as follows:

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The maximum public funding a qualified candidate can receive is annually adjusted for CPI, with initial adjustments as follows:

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Primary General Council 151,000 189,000 Controller 403,000 453,000 City Atty 453,000 528,000 Mayor 1,007,000 1,208,000

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Primary General Council 100,000 125,000 Controller 267,000 300,000 City Atty 300,000 350,000 Mayor 667,000 800,000

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Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 8

The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 4 of 16

MISCELLANEOUS RecommendationCitation Current LawTopic

LAMC 49.7.16(A)-Contributor Certification

For contributions included in a claim for matching funds, the candidate must obtain a certification from the contributor. For other contributions,

the candidate must permit a contributor to provide a certification but is not required to obtain one.
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For all contributions, a candidate must obtain a consolidated certification under penalty of perjury from the contributor.

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(B) LAAC 24.32(b)(2)(A)(v) LAAC 24.34(a)(8)(B)(ii)

LAMC 49.7.3(A)(3) LAMC 49.7.3(B)(2)(c)

The aggregate per-person contribution limit in Charter 470(c)(6) is adjusted annually for CPI.

The aggregate per-person contribution limit in Charter 470(c)(6) has been ruled unconstitutional and is removed from the CPI formula.

Aggregate Per-Person Contribution Limit

B. MATCHING FUNDS PROGRAM

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1. Current Law

In 1990, City voters created a voluntary program to provide limited public funding to the campaigns of qualified City candidates (the program does

not extend to candidates for the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education). The goals of the matching funds program include helping candidates raise enough money to communicate their views without requiring excessive fundraising, limiting campaign spending, increasing the value of smaller contributions, making elections more competitive, and helping avoid the appearance of corruption that can occur when financial ties exist between elected officials and special interests. Charter 471(a)(2). The 1993 elections were the first in which matching funds were distributed to qualified candidates.
Tagged Passions:education, voting, fundraising, funding, program, election, and finance

To fund the program, the City is required to make a minimum appropriation to the Public Matching Funds Trust Fund (the trust fund) each year, unless

a fiscal emergency is declared. Charter 471(c). The trust fund is used to make matching funds payments to qualified candidates. The appropriation to the trust fund changes each year, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI), and the total appropriation this fiscal year is 3,265,683. The balance of the trust fund is projected to be approximately 19,707,000 at the end of the fiscal year on June 30, 2019.
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City candidates who would like to receive public funding for their campaigns must agree to participate in the matching funds program and meet

specific qualification criteria. LAMC 49.7.23(C). The qualification criteria are identified in Attachment B and include the following:
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Qualify to appear on the ballot. Be opposed by someone qualified to appear on the ballot. Attend a training session conducted by the Ethics

Commission.
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Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 9

The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 5 of 16

File all required campaign statements. Limit personal and campaign spending to specific amounts. Receive 200 qualified contributions from individuals

who reside in their City Council district (or, for Citywide candidates, the City). Receive minimum amounts of qualified contributions, depending on the office sought ( 25,000 for City Council; 75,000 for Controller or City Attorney; 150,000 for Mayor). Agree to participate in debates.
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Once qualified, a candidate may receive public funding as a match to private contributions. Up to 250 per contributor may be matched for City Council

candidates, and up to 500 per contributor may be matched for Citywide candidates. LAMC 49.7.27(A).
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The match rate depends on the number of valid signatures the candidate obtains during the nominating petition process. If a candidate collects 500

valid signatures, the match rate is one public dollar for every qualified private dollar (1:1) in both the primary election and the general election. If a candidate collects 1,000 valid signatures, the match rate is two public dollars for every qualified private dollar (2:1) in the primary election and four public dollars for every qualified private dollar (4:1) in the general election. LAMC 49.7.27(B)-(C).
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Total funding available to a qualified candidate is limited, based on the office sought and the type of election. LAMC 49.7.29.

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2. Other Jurisdictions

In its assessment of the matching funds program, the Ethics Commission compared the public financing programs in a variety of cities. Five California

cities have matching funds programs: Berkeley, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Sacramento (not funded since 2011), and San Francisco. In addition, Oakland has a public financing program that reimburses qualified campaign expenditures made by its city council candidates.
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Outside the state, New York City and Washington D.C. have matching funds programs. In addition, Seattle has a public financing program that allows

residents to give candidates up to 100 in vouchers, which may be redeemed through the city.
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Attachment A provides demographic details about each of the jurisdictions surveyed for this review.

3. Recommendations

The Ethics Commission recommends amendments regarding two qualification criteria (in-district contributions and debates), the match rate and

signature requirement, and the maximum funding available to a qualified candidate. The recommendations are discussed in more detail below.
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Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 10

The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 6 of 16

Collecting In-district Contributionsa.

Since the 2015 elections, participating candidates have been required to receive 200 qualified contributions from individuals residing in the

geographic area they seek to represent. For City Council candidates, that means the council district; and for Citywide candidates, that means the City. LAMC 49.7.23(C)(2).
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The Ethics Commission recommends reducing the number of in-district contributions to 100. See proposed LAMC 49.7.23(C)(2); proposed LAAC

24.32(b)(2)(C).
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The goals of the in-district contribution requirement are to encourage interaction between candidates and constituents and to establish a candidate s

public support. However, because each district has its own economic realities, it may be more difficult for candidates in some districts to obtain 200 in-district contributions.

In addition, the Ethics Commission found that a 200-contribution requirement tends to be burdensome for candidates and to affect staff processing

times. Since the 2011 elections, the number of contributions submitted and the amount of staff time required to verify each claim for matching funds have both increased dramatically. For example, from 2011 to 2015 (two election cycles in which the same seats were on the ballot), the total number of contributions submitted increased by 166 percent, and the time required to verify an average claim increased by 814 percent. This increase results because more contributions are being submitted and because it takes more time to verify individual addresses.
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MATCHING FUNDS CLAIMS Approx. Time

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To Verify Average

Contribution

Approx. Time to Verify Average

Claim

Total Contributions

Submitted

Total Claims

Submitted

Average Contributions

Per Claim Election

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2011 2,706 2 minutes 50 54 1.8 hours 2013 21,059 * 2 minutes 155 137 4.6 hours 2015 7,192 8 minutes 77 96 12.8 hours 2017 7,640 8 minutes 65 118 15.7

hours

A claim may be either an original or an amendment. Average and approximate numbers are rounded. * All Citywide seats were on the ballot, with no

incumbents.
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The Ethics Commission considered data about the geographic sources of City contributions and found that most contributions come from within the City.

Since 2011, City contributions have ranged from 53 to 61 percent. Contributions from within Los Angeles County (including the City) have been even more consistent, ranging from 84 to 87 percent. Contributions from outside the county have not exceeded 16 percent since 2011, and those from outside the state have been either five percent or seven percent, depending on whether the Citywide seats are on the ballot. This data is summarized in the chart on the next page.
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Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 11

2011 Regular Election and CD 15

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Special Election

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2013 Regular Election and CD 6 Special Election

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2015 Regular Election

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2017 Regular Election

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Count: 11,562 61,392 13,381 19,609

The Ethics Commission also looked at contribution requirements in other jurisdictions. While no other California city requires in-district

contributions, several do require in-city contributions. For example, San Francisco requires mayoral candidates to collect 500 (non incumbent) or 750 (incumbent) contributions from city residents, and it requires board of supervisor candidates to collect 100 (non-incumbent) or 150 (incumbent) contributions from city residents. In Berkeley, candidates must obtain 30 contributions from city residents.
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Outside the state, in-district contributions are required. Seattle requires city council candidates to receive 150 in-city contributions, 75 of which

must be in-district. Their city attorney candidates must receive 150 in-city contributions, and their at-large city council candidates must receive 400 in-city contributions. In New York City, city council candidates must receive at least 75 in-district contributions, and borough president candidates must receive at least 100 in-borough contributions. New York s mayoral candidates must receive at least 1,000 in-city contributions, and its other citywide candidates must receive at least 500 in-city contributions.
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The Ethics Commission also noted the uncertainty about the upcoming 2020 elections the first time City elections will be held in even-numbered years.

If fundraising will be more
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90

100

The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 7 of 16

2011-2017 Elections Geographic Distribution of Contributions (Count)

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In LA City In LA County (Excludes LA City) In CA (Excludes LA County) Outside of CA

7 8

24

61

5 8

28

59

7

9

26

58

5

11

31

53

111

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Friday - September 21, 2018 - PAGE 12

The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 8 of 16

difficult when City candidates are competing with state and federal candidates, their ability to collect 200 in-district contributions may be

compromised.

The Ethics Commission further noted that candidates are already required to demonstrate that they have public support through the nominating petition

process. A candidate must collect at least 500 valid signatures from registered voters in order to qualify for the ballot, and qualification for the ballot is a prerequisite to receiving public funds.
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For these reasons, the Ethics Commission believes that a 100-contribution requirement will preserve the goals of constituent interaction and

demonstrated public support, while also reducing the burden of and encouraging participation in the matching funds program.
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The recommended ordinance changes for this amendment can be found on pages 6 and 12 of Attachment F.

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b. Identifying In-district Contributions

When a candidate wants to qualify for and receive public funds, the candidate must submit a Form 22 (Matching Funds Request for Qualification / Claim

for Payment) and list all contributions being submitted for qualification or payment purposes. The law currently requires candidates to list their in-district contributions separately. LAAC 24.32(b)(2)(A)(iii). However, a separate list has never been required or necessary, because the Form 22 includes a spreadsheet with a column for identifying the in-district contributions.
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The Ethics Commission recommends eliminating this unnecessary procedural requirement from the Administrative Code. See proposed LAAC

24.32(b)(2)(A)(iii). The recommended ordinance change for this amendment can be found on page 12 of Attachment F.
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Debatesc.

Another qualification criterion requires candidates to agree to participate in one debate with opponents in the primary election and two debates with

the opponent in the general election. LAMC 49.7.23(C)(6). This requirement has existed since the inception of the matching funds program in 1993 and requires only that candidates agree to participate. The Ethics Commission recommends an amendment that would require candidates to actually participate in a debate or conduct a town hall meeting. See proposed LAMC 49.7.23; proposed LAAC 24.31(11), 24.32(a)(3)(B).
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This qualification requirement is designed to help ensure that candidates engage with the public and that the public is aware of a candidate s views

on important issues. However, in order to avoid a scenario in which a non-participating candidate could prevent a participating candidate from receiving public funds simply by refusing to engage in a debate, actual participation has never been required.
Tagged Passions:funding

By amending the requirement to include an option that gives the participating candidate control over her ability to qualify for public funds, the

goal of encouraging constituent
Tagged Passions:funding

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The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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August 30, 2018 Page 9 of 16

interaction will be more effectively achieved. To help ensure actual public engagement, the Ethics Commission believes that a town hall meeting

should be an event that is open to the public, the media, and other candidates and permits the public to ask the candidate questions.
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, ethics, and events

As noted in the table below, six of the nine cities surveyed in this review have a debate requirement. Seattle requires its candidates to actually

participate in debates.

DEBATE REQUIREMENT Candidates Must

Agree to Participate in Debates

City

Los Angeles Yes Berkeley No Long Beach No Oakland No * Sacramento1 Yes San Francisco Yes New York City Yes Seattle Yes **

Tagged Passions:beach

Washington D.C. Yes * The law strongly encourage[s] candidates to participate. ** Candidates must actually participate in debates. f Program has not

been funded since 2011.
Tagged Passions:program

The recommended ordinance changes for this amendment can be found on pages 7, 10, and 11 of Attachment F.

Tagged Passions:ordinance

d. Match Rate / Signature Requirement

As mentioned above in Section B.1, public funds are paid to qualified candidates at rates that are based on how many signatures the candidate gathers

from registered voters during the nominating petition process. With 500 signatures, a candidate receives a 1:1 match rate in both primary and general elections. With 1,000 signatures, a candidate receives a 2:1 match rate in the primary election and a 4:1 match rate in the general election. This first became effective with the 2015 elections. Prior to that, all qualified candidates received the same 1:1 rate of match in every election.
Tagged Passions:rates, voting, funding, and election

The Ethics Commission recommends eliminating the signature requirement in favor of a 6:1 match rate for all qualified candidates in both primary and

general elections. See proposed LAMC 49.7.27(B). This recommendation mirrors recommendations the Ethics Commission previously made in 2014. See Council File No. 12-1269-S2.
Tagged Passions:council, boards and commissions, voting, ethics, and election

To qualify for the ballot, candidates are required to demonstrate public support by obtaining at least 500 valid signatures from registered voters.

Further public support is demonstrated through the in-district contribution requirement. As a result, the Ethics Commission does not believe an additional signature requirement is necessary to demonstrate that a candidate has sufficient public support to justify the receipt of public funds. In addition,
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, ethics, funding, and election

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The Honorable City Council Amendments to the Campaign Finance Laws

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