TX - Plano: CITY COUNCIL

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CITY COUNCIL

WILL OPEN THE MEETING AT 5:00 PM AND IMMEDIATELY THEREAFTER CONVENE INTO EXECUTIVE SESSION, FOLLOWED BY THE PRELIMINARY OPEN MEETING IN THE PLANO MUNICIPAL BUILDING, 1520 K AVENUE, November 12, 2018, IN COMPLIANCE WITH VERNON'S TEXAS CODES ANNOTATED, GOVERNMENT CODE CHAPTER 551 (OPEN MEETINGS ACT), AS FOLLOWS:

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Mission Statement: The City of Plano is a regional and national leader, providing outstanding services and facilities through cooperative efforts that engage our citizens and that contribute to the quality of life in our community.

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CALL TO ORDER

EXECUTIVE SESSION

I.
Legal Advice a) Respond to questions and receive legal advice on agenda items

Mims 10 min.

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II.
Litigation a) City of Plano v. Edukid, LP.; Cause No. 007-01603- 2017, County Court of Law No. 7, Collin County, Texas

Mims 10 min.
Tagged Passions:legal and court

III.
Economic Development Discuss a financial offer or other incentive to a business prospect to locate, stay, or expand in Plano and consider any commercial and financial information from the business prospect

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:business, commercial, development, finance, economic development, incentive, and Development

Glasscock/Bane 15 min.

IV.
Real Estate a) Downtown Plano b) 15th Street East c) Hoblitzelle Park Trail Connection (Hedgcoxe Road Undercrossing)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:parks, streets, downtown, and trails

Carr/Reeves 15 min.

PRELIMINARY OPEN MEETING

I.
Consideration and action resulting from Executive Session discussion

No additional detail provided

II.
Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report - September 2018

Tacke 10 min.

Tagged Passions:financial report and finance

III.
Discussion and direction re: Los Rios Golf Course Reeves 10 min.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:golf

IV.
Housing Trends Analysis and Strategic Plan Schwarz 20 min.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:strategic and housing

V.
Sanitary Sewer Overflow Reduction Program Cosgrove 15 min.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, sewer, and program

VI.
Consent and Regular Agendas Council 5 min.

No additional detail provided

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VII.
Council items for discussion/action on future agendas Council 5 min.

In accordance with the provisions of the Open Meetings Act, during Preliminary Open Meetings, agenda items will be discussed and votes may be taken where appropriate. Municipal Center is wheelchair accessible. A sloped curb entry is available at the main entrance facing Municipal/L Avenue, with specially marked parking spaces nearby. Access and special parking are also available on the north side of the building. The Senator Florence Shapiro Council Chambers is accessible by elevator to the lower level. Requests for sign interpreters or special services must be received forty-eight (48) hours prior to the meeting time by calling the City Secretary at 972-941- 7120.

Tagged Passions:services and parking

CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: Lisa Henderson CAPTION Legal Advice a) Respond to questions and receive legal advice on agenda items FINANCIAL SUMMARY Not Applicable FUND(S): COMMENTS:
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SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
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CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: CAPTION Litigation a) City of Plano v. Edukid, LP.; Cause No. 007-01603-2017, County Court of Law No. 7, Collin County, Texas FINANCIAL SUMMARY FUND(S): COMMENTS:
Tagged Passions:legal, court, and finance

SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
Tagged Passions:strategic

CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: Lisa Henderson CAPTION Economic Development Discuss a financial offer or other incentive to a business prospect to locate, stay, or expand in Plano and consider any commercial and financial information from the business prospect FINANCIAL SUMMARY Not Applicable FUND(S): COMMENTS:
Tagged Passions:business, commercial, development, finance, economic development, incentive, and Development

SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
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CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: Lisa Henderson CAPTION Real Estate a) Downtown Plano b) 15th Street East c) Hoblitzelle Park Trail Connection (Hedgcoxe Road Undercrossing) FINANCIAL SUMMARY Not Applicable FUND(S): COMMENTS:
Tagged Passions:parks, streets, downtown, trails, and finance

SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
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CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: Lisa Henderson CAPTION Consideration and action resulting from Executive Session discussion FINANCIAL SUMMARY Not Applicable FUND(S): COMMENTS:
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SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
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CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: CAPTION

Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report - September 2018

FINANCIAL SUMMARY FUND(S): COMMENTS:

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SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
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ATTACHMENTS: Description Upload Date Type CMFR September 2018 11/7/2018 Informational

ABOUT THIS REPORT

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018

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The City of Plano Finance Department is dedicated to excellence in local government,

comprehensive fiscal management, compliance and reporting. The Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report (CMFR) is a unique document, directed at providing our audience (internal and external users), with the general awareness of the City s financial positions and economic activity.
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This report is comprised of four sections:

A.
The Financial Analysis reports the performance of the major operating funds of the City.

Narrative disclosures are used to highlight any significant changes or fluctuations.
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B.
The Financial Summary provides comparative data for major revenue sources and expenditure items.

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C.
The Economic Analysis section contains a summary of the key economic indicators a n d

an in-depth review with graphic illustrations.

D.
The Investment Report provides a description of investment activity during the month and

a summary of interest earnings. We would like to acknowledge those responsible for this report: Tyler Anderson for the
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Financial Analysis and Summary, Amy Anderson for the Economic Analysis and Quarterly

No additional detail provided

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Hotel Report, and Myra Conklin for the Investment Report.

The CMFR is intended to provide our audience with a timely, unique, and informative document. Please provide us with any comments or suggestions you may have and should you desire additional information, feel free to contact my office. Denise Tacke

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Director of Finance

P.O. Box 860358 Plano, TX 75006-0358 972-941-7135 SECTION A FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
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City of Plano

Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report
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This report is designed for internal use and does not include all the funds and accounts in-

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cluded in the City of Plano s operations. For a complete report, refer to the City of Plano Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, available on the City of Plano s website and

through the City s Finance Department. REPORT NOTES SEPTEMBER 2018 The information represented in this report provides a summary of the General Fund and Enterprise
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Funds revenues and expenses which offers readers an overview of the City of Plano s finances.

This section compares year to date activity in the current fiscal year to the same time period in prior year. Please note that ending fund balances are subject to final audit adjustments. The graphs below represent year to date revenues and expenses as a percent of the proposed budget comparing the current and prior fiscal years.

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HIGHLIGHTS OF FUND VARIANCES

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 A-1 Page 12

REPORT NOTES CONTINUED FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS GENERAL FUND VARIANCES REVENUES Taxes Sales tax revenue increased from the prior year by 4,062,075 partially due to the Texas Tax Amnesty Program, which allows for the payment of delinquent sales tax to the state Comptroller without further penalty. Although there is currently an increase in sales tax revenue compared to
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, financial report, penalty, finance, sale, and program

prior year, negative audit adjustments are 1,364,118 higher than the prior year. Ad valorem tax revenue is higher by 13,234,255 over prior year. Of this increase, residential,

multi-family, and commercial properties are higher over prior year by 4,105,486, 1,323,426 and 7,805,343, respectively. The change is 70 in existing property value increase and 30 new growth. Franchise Fee Revenue Electrical franchise revenues increased 1,292,399 primarily due to retrospective franchise fees for payments made between September 19, 2009 and June 30, 2011. Additionally, increased usage as a result of colder weather conditions in the first half of the current year attributed to the higher revenues. Telephone franchise revenues decreased 908,408 primarily due to reconciliation of accounts from the previous provider in the prior year. Gas franchise revenues increased 363,448 due to colder weather in the first half of the current year. CATV franchise revenues decreased 205,840 due to a reduction in customer accounts as more customers are utilizing alternative options to cable. Licenses and Permits
Tagged Passions:property, taxes, commercial, license, audit, Taxes, ad valorem, and growth

Revenues from fire protection plan reviews, which are collected in conjunction with construction

permits, decreased 105,635 due to less construction in the current year. Building permit revenue decreased 1,280,076 due to higher valued permits issued for corpora-
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tions relocating to Plano in the prior year.

Fees and Service Charges

Revenue from ambulance services increased 357,122 in the current year. The City participates in the Ambulance Supplemental Payment Program, which is designed to reimburse providers based on actual costs of providing medical services to Medicaid and uninsured patients.

Tagged Passions:health insurance, services, and program

Revenues from emergency 911 fees, which fluctuate due to the timing of collections from phone carriers, decreased 264,518 in the current year primarily due to fewer land lines.

Engineering inspection fees decreased 415,373 primarily due to less development in the current year. Intergovernmental Revenue
Tagged Passions:911, development, intergovernmental, emergency, and Development

Revenue from providing Resource Officers at Plano Independent School District schools in- creased 492,500 in the current year, due to 15 additional officers placed at middle schools and

high schools. Miscellaneous Revenue Interest revenue increased 229,102 in the current year due to higher interest rates and a larger investment portfolio compared to prior year.
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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 A-2 Page 13

REPORT NOTES CONTINUED EXPENDITURES Personnel Services
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Personnel services costs increased 9,104,978 from the prior year primarily due to a 3 salary

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increase effective October 2, 2017.

Materials and Supplies Postage expenditures increased 94,614 due to a higher volume of mailing distributions. Publication expenditures and encumbrances for libraries increased 93,389 in the current year as the libraries move toward more electronic content such as e-books and e-audiobooks, digital magazines and streaming services. Due to a larger amount of new hires in the prior year, wearing apparel costs for the Fire depart- ment decreased 93,655 in the current year.
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Minor apparatus costs for the Police Department decreased 167,440 in the current year as a

No additional detail provided

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result of portable radio purchases in the prior year for 18 new Patrol officers. Minor apparatus expenditures and encumbrances for the Fire Department decreased 223,544

compared to prior year due to one-time purchases to stock Engine 8 and Truck 2. Minor apparatus costs for Parks and Recreation decreased 199,439 due to prior year installation of a lightning detection system, including warning sirens, strobe lights, and email and text alerts. Costs and encumbrances related to the Service Center at Enfield Park decreased 126,371, as construction occurred in the prior year. Due to renovations which resulted in additional space at the Plano Senior Recreation Center, current year encumbrances for exercise equipment increased 101,534. Expenditures and encumbrances for Police increased 126,879 in the current year primarily due to the purchase of ammunition for new and existing officers. Additionally, more training courses have been provided in the current year requiring additional ammunition purchases. Costs associated with construction and relocation of intersections increased 402,933, as mainte-
Tagged Passions:transportation, parks, public safety, purchasing, Gun Control, radio, gun control, training, equipment, construction, recreation, and fire departments and districts

nance of traffic signals and signs occurs as needed and varies year-to-year.

Contractual and Processional and Other
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Professional services costs for the Purchasing department decreased 116,283. As Purchasing staff has increased over prior year the need for contract labor for technology project implemen-

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services, contract, purchasing, Technology, and technology

tation has decreased. Contract costs for the Neighborhood Reinvestment division decreased 122,384. The Great

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:contract and neighborhood

Update Rebate Program is the City s home investment incentive program that allows citizens to

receive rebates for home improvements. Expenditures occur as needed and vary year-to-year, although budget has remained comparable to prior year. Contract and professional services expenditures and encumbrances for park support services increased 146,622 in the current year primarily due to additional forestry services, which occur as needed. Professional services costs for Grounds Maintenance increased 121,710 in the current year due to landscape recovery projects at public buildings. Professional service contracts for park maintenance, custodial services, and irrigation decreased 289,239 in the current year due to the timing of contract renewals. Payments to Collin Central Appraisal District increased 109,503 compared to prior year. Electric expenditures decreased 1,851,486 due to a change in provider and rate structure. Gas expenditures increased 149,305 primarily as a result of a rate adjustment by the City s provider, as well as colder weather in the first half of the current year. Interdepartmental water expenditures increased 1,058,919 in the current year due to a rate

Tagged Passions:parks, services, utility, Utility, investment, contract, Forestry, buildings and grounds, budget, electric, incentive, water, and program

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 A-3 Page 14

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increase effective November 1, 2017.

Equipment replacement contributions for the Police department increased 174,472 in the current year primarily due to make-ready charges for additional vehicles related to new posi-

tions authorized in the budget. Replacement charges for the Fire department increased 485,094 in the current year due to the

Tagged Passions:budget, public safety, equipment, and fire departments and districts

acquisition of new capital equipment such as Thermal Imaging Cameras, LifePak15 defibrillators,

and replacement equipment for Engine 8 and Truck 2. Budgeted contributions by Emergency Management decreased 311,146 in the current year as adequate funds are available for replacement of special equipment.
Tagged Passions:transportation, budget, equipment, funding, and emergency

Equipment Replacement Fund (ERF) charges, for rolling stock or large capital items, are based on each department s actual purchases from their equipment replacement accounts. Costs

may vary from year-to-year depending on the equipment replacement cycles established and when the replacement purchases actually occur. New additions to the fleet are also included in these charges. These expenditures represent departments paying into their respective deprecia-

Tagged Passions:purchasing and equipment

tion accounts to fund a future replacement. Current year ERF charges are greater by 643,076. Municipal garage charges for the Fire department increased 342,771 in the current year

No additional detail provided

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primarily due to generator repairs. As the result of an increased Technology Services budget, Information Services charges are

higher over prior year by 463,981. The General Fund absorbs 80 of the services provided by Technology Services. Election expenses decreased 128,325 due to the general, special, and runoff elections held in the prior year. Miscellaneous Neighborhood Reinvestment expenditures and encumbrances decreased

Tagged Passions:services, budget, Technology, voting, technology, neighborhood, and election

126,664 in the current year due to fewer grants being awarded as part of the Neighborhood

Vitality and Beautification Program. Capital Outlay A prior year land acquisition in the amount of 2,649,969 relates to a future Police, Fire and Public Works facility. This one-time expenditure was paid for with excess sales tax collections.
Tagged Passions:Public Works, public works, taxes, Taxes, public safety, neighborhood, facility, sale, grant, and program

Improvements to the City s sand and salt storage facility increased expenditures 1,090,558 in the current year.

Furniture and fixture costs related to renovation of the Plano Senior Recreation Center de- creased 117,015 in the current year due to timing of construction. Facilities Maintenance expenditures and encumbrances related to the prior year installation of an exhaust capture system in the equipment bays of Plano s Fire Stations decreased 583,074. Implements and apparatus expenditures for the Fire department decreased 133,423 due to the prior year purchase of emergency chest compression systems.
Tagged Passions:purchasing, equipment, facility, construction, recreation, emergency, and fire departments and districts

Costs related to fleet additions increased 214,747 in the current year due to the purchase of vehicles for use by Police and Citizens Assisting the Plano Police (CAPP) volunteers.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:public safety, purchasing, and volunteer

Fleet additions, primarily two dump-body, crew cab trucks to be used for athletic field mainte- nance, increased current year expenditures by 100,125.

Expenditures for books and non-print media decreased 331,082 due to fewer purchases in the current year. REPORT NOTES CONTINUED

Tagged Passions:transportation, purchasing, and athletics

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 A-4 Page 15

ENTERPRISE FUND VARIANCES WATER AND SEWER Revenues Water revenues are higher by 19,379,956 in the current year due to a rate increase effective No- vember 1, 2017. Sewer revenues, which are calculated on averages of the winter quarter period (November-February) from prior actual usage, are higher by 4,476,696 in the current year, also due to a rate increase effective November 1, 2017. Interest revenue increased 109,225 in the current year due to higher interest rates and a larger investment portfolio compared to prior year. Insur- ance and damage receipts increased 150,323 in the current year due to hail damage to City vehi- cles. Revenue from rent charged to cellular companies for use of City water towers increased 161,278 in the current year due to standardization of the fee structure. Expenses
Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, investment, Cell tower, financial report, rates, cell tower, finance, sewer, and water

Personnel services decreased 399,803 primarily due to vacant positions, offset by a 3 salary in-

Tagged Passions:services and personnel

crease effective October 2, 2017. Due to higher volume of de-chlorination tablets in the prior year, chemical expenses and encumbrances decreased 376,295. The City continues to flush water from fire hydrants, as needed, in order to keep the water as fresh and safe as possible for consumers. The

City uses de-chlorination tablets to remove chlorine residuals making the flushed water safe for re- ceiving creeks and streams as required by Federal Law. Maintenance parts and supplies for regis- ters and meter transmitter units for the fixed meter reading network are incurred as needed and have decreased 173,205 compared to prior year. Costs associated with the purchase of water meters for new meter sets and meter change outs, as well as fire hydrant meters, vary from year-to- year and increased 160,741 in the current year. Contractual payments to North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) increased by 7,883,123 in the current year due to a rate increase effective October 1, 2017. ENVIRONMENTAL WASTE SERVICES Revenues
Tagged Passions:services, utility, Utility, purchasing, sewer, environment, and water

Revenue from commercial franchise contributions decreased 95,000 in the current year due to a change in the commercial franchise agreement, however, the budget is comparable to prior year.

Tagged Passions:budget and commercial

Commercial solid waste revenues are the City s portion of the waste and disposal fees collected by Republic Services, the City s waste disposal contractor. The City currently receives 7.5 of gross re- ceipts collected monthly which includes revenues for monthly service, rental of roll-off containers,

delivery charges, fees for late payment and additional collections. Republic Services also reimburs- es the City all costs associated with the commercial disposal of solid waste at other locations. Recy- cling revenue decreased 564,299 in the current year due to a decline in market prices. Compost revenues increased 607,435 due to restructuring of personnel, additional promotional efforts, and increased advertising, which have led to new commercial customers in the current year. The Con- struction and Demolition (C D) Recycling Deposit Program directs unreimbursed funds from private development projects into an account to fund identified future approved programs. Examples of programs include increased diversion of related waste from the landfill, expanded recyclable mate- rials, and development of sustainability-based programs. Current year receipts of 307,919 and prior year receipts of 200,000 were used to develop Plano s 20 year Solid Waste Plan and C D Emerging Markets Program. REPORT NOTES CONTINUED
Tagged Passions:rental, services, utility, Utility, demolition, recycling, personnel, commercial, development, sustainability, advertising, landfill, solid waste, funding, market, Development, and program

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 A-5 Page 16

Expenses
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Personnel services increased 160,990 primarily due to a 3 salary increase effective October 2, 2017. Sand, clay and loam expenses increased 157,352, as higher volume of compost sales in the

current year has led to additional soil purchases to meet demand. Professional contract costs relat- ed to temporary labor for bagging compost product increased 142,807 in the current year due to increased hourly rates. Contractual payments to North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) are
Tagged Passions:services, utility, Utility, contract, personnel, purchasing, rates, sale, and water

lower by 200,528 in the current year as a result of decreased tonnage. Equipment Replacement Fund (ERF) charges, for rolling stock or large capital items, are based on each department s actual

No additional detail provided

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purchases from their equipment replacement accounts. Costs may vary from year-to-year depend- ing on the equipment replacement cycles established and when the replacement purchases actu- ally occur. New additions to the fleet are also included in these charges. The expenses represent

departments paying into their respective depreciation accounts to fund a future replacement. Cur- rent year ERF charges are lower by 378,375. Expenses for improvements to City structures de- creased 157,184 due to prior year construction of a bridge at the Environmental Education build- ing. Capital costs for implements and apparatus increased 196,645 in the current year primarily due to a new wheel loader for the Compost division. Expenses related to fleet additions increased
Tagged Passions:education, purchasing, equipment, construction, and environment

544,927 in the current year primarily due to half-ton pickup trucks and a dump truck purchased for the Compost division and a refuse truck purchased for Solid Waste Collections.

MUNICIPAL DRAINAGE Revenues Municipal drainage charges are comparable to prior year, 7,535,378 in fiscal year 2017 and 7,524,912 in fiscal year 2018, as rates have remained constant. Interest revenue increased 18,332 in the current year due to higher interest rates and a larger investment portfolio compared to prior
Tagged Passions:transportation, utility, Utility, investment, purchasing, rates, solid waste, and stormwater

year. Insurance and damage receipts increased 38,979 due to higher claims in the current year. Expenses

Although a 3 salary increase occurred in October 2017, personnel costs decreased 209,495 pri- marily due to reclassification of an Engineer position from the Municipal Drainage fund to the Gen- eral fund. Contract and professional services expenses increased 78,631 in the current year due to a new contract related to storm water monitoring. Expenses and encumbrances related to mainte- nance agreements and other contracts increased 86,517 in the current year due to additional mowing and debris hauling services, as well as a new street sweeping contract. Costs associated with additions to fleet increased 28,447 in the current year primarily due to the purchase of two half -ton pickup trucks. CONVENTION AND TOURISM Revenues Hotel and Motel tax revenue increased 523,969 due to the timing of deposits, as well as the addi- tion of new hotels and increased room rates. Operating revenues increased 876,227 due to reno- vations being complete at Plano Event Center resulting in increased reservations. Expenses

Tagged Passions:transportation, conventions, services, utility, Utility, contract, taxes, personnel, streets, Taxes, purchasing, hotel, rates, events, tourism, insurance, stormwater, and water

Personnel services increased 64,586 primarily due to a 3 salary increase effective October 2, 2017.

Tagged Passions:services and personnel

Expenses related to food concessions at the Plano Event Center increased 84,207 due to more events being booked in the current year as a result of prior year renovations. Advertising expenses and encumbrances increased 149,408 primarily due to online marketing for the 2018 USA Softball

18U and 16U Nationals tournament. Professional services expenses and encumbrances for media REPORT NOTES CONTINUED

Tagged Passions:services, advertising, events, and market

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 A-6 Page 17

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relations, advertising, and website maintenance associated with Visit Plano varies year over year

based on current needs and decreased 241,022. Visit Plano s contractual expenses and encum- brances increased 294,242 in the current year due to hosting the 2018 USA Softball 18U and 16U Nationals tournament, as well as the costs of brochures and signs associated with the new Wayfind- ing project, resulting in an increased budget. Expenses and encumbrances related to Visit Plano s relocation to new office space decreased 187,875 in the current year. Due to the purchase of

Tagged Passions:budget, purchasing, and advertising

new event management software for Plano Event Center in the prior year, software expenses and encumbrances decreased 87,000.

GOLF COURSE Revenues Green fee revenue at Pecan Hollow Golf Course decreased 68,671 primarily due to unfavorable weather conditions, which resulted in 21 more course closures in the current year than in the prior year. Insurance and damage receipts of 31,040 in the current year relate to claims for expenses and loss of revenue due to course flooding. Expenses
Tagged Passions:flooding, information technology, golf, events, insurance, and Information Technology

Personnel services increased 14,238 primarily due to a 3 salary increase effective October 2, 2017.

Electric utilities expenses decreased 25,425 in the current year due to change in provider. Equip- ment Replacement Fund (ERF) charges, for rolling stock or large capital items, are based on depart- ment s actual purchases from their equipment replacement accounts. Costs may vary from year-to -year depending on the equipment replacement cycles established and when the replacement purchases actually occur. New additions to the fleet are also included in these charges. The ex- penses represent departments paying into their respective depreciation accounts to fund a future replacement. Current year ERF charges are lower by 14,803. RECREATION REVOLVING Revenues Recreation fee revenues decreased 106,594 as a result of Oak Point Recreation Center renovations in the current year, in addition to reporting changes related to revenue recognition for recreation fees. Expenses
Tagged Passions:services, utility, Utility, personnel, purchasing, recognition, equipment, recreation, and electric

Personnel services increased 167,490 primarily due to a 3 salary increase effective October 2,

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2017. Contract and professional services expenses related to operating camps, clinics and adult sports leagues decreased 110,468 primarily due to fewer camps and clinics being offered in the

current year. Maintenance agreements expenses increased 40,098 primarily due to costs for the Parks and Recreations operating software. Due to the timing of payments, facility usage expenses are lower by 123,012 in the current year. REPORT NOTES CONTINUED

Tagged Passions:parks, services, contract, information technology, sports, facility, recreation, and Information Technology

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 A-7 Page 18

SECTION B FINANCIAL SUMMARY
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City of Plano

Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report
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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-1 Page 20

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-2 Page 21

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-3 Page 22

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-4 Page 23

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-5 Page 24

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-6 Page 25

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-7 Page 26

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 B-8

HEALTH CLAIMS FUND THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30 OF FISCAL YEARS 2018 AND 2017 PROPERTY LIABILITY LOSS FUND Fiscal Year 2018 Fiscal Year 2017 Fiscal Year 2016 Claims Paid per General Ledger 2,754,790 2,686,947 1,715,741 Net Judgments/Damages/Attorney Fees 3,201,242 4,909,366 1,121,889 Net Expenses 4,402,777 6,069,779 1,920,433
Tagged Passions:health, property, legal, financial report, and finance

Less: Insurance/Damage Receipts (1,553,255) (1,526,534) (917,197)

No additional detail provided

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ANALYSIS OF PROPERTY LIABILITY LOSS FUND THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30 OF FISCAL YEARS 2018, 2017 2016

SECTION C ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
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City of Plano

Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 C-1

Figure I shows a breakdown of the various sources of revenues for the City s General Fund year to date through September 30, 2018. The largest category is Sales Tax in the amount of 85,592,139. Closest behind Sales Tax is Property Tax- Residential in the amount of 64,777,586 and Property Tax- Commercial with a total Figure II shows a breakdown of the various expenditures and encumbrances for the City s General Fund Year to Date through September 30, 2018. The largest category is Personnel Services for Public Safety Ser- vices totaling 123,995,934 which includes the police, fire, fire-civilian and public safety communications
Tagged Passions:services, property, taxes, personnel, commercial, Taxes, public safety, Communications, financial report, communications, finance, property tax, and sale

departments. Closest behind that category are Personnel Services (for all other departments) totaling

74,783,164 and Contractual and Professional totaling 69,198,360. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

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City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 C-2

Figure III shows sales tax allocations
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collected in the months of October

2016, October 2017, and October

2018 for the City of Plano and nine

area cities. Each of the cities shown has a sales tax rate of 1 ,
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and sale

except for the cities of Allen and

Frisco, which have a 2 rate, but distribute half of the amount shown in the graph to 4A and 4B develop-

ment corporations within their re-

spective cities, and the City of Ar- lington which has a 1.75 sales tax rate with .25 dedicated to road maintenance and .50 for funding of the Dallas Cowboys Complex Development Project. In the month

Tagged Passions:taxes, streets, Taxes, development, funding, sale, and Development

of October, the City of Plano re-

ceived 6,413,690 from this 1 tax. The percentage change in sales tax allocations for the area cities, comparing October 2018 to Octo- ber 2017, ranged from -0.86 for the City of Richardson to 40.26 for the City of Allen. Sales tax allocation of 6,413,690 was remitted to the City of Plano in the month of October. This amount represents a decrease of 0.86
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and sale

compared to the amount received

in October 2017. Sales tax revenue is generated from the 1 tax on applicable business activity within the City. These taxes were collect- ed by businesses filing monthly re- turns, reported in August to the State, and received in October by the City of Plano. Figure IV represents actual sales
Tagged Passions:business, taxes, Taxes, and sale

and use tax receipts for the months

of August, September, and Octo-
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

ber of the last three fiscal years.

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Figure VI tracks the number of jobs cumulatively created in Plano due to the City entering into a 380 Economic Development Agreement (380 Grant) and the number of cumulative tax abatements of- fered. The City of Plano occasionally uses property tax abatements to attract new industry and commercial enterprises, and to encourage the retention and development of existing businesses. The City can limit the property taxes assessed on real property or tangible personal property located on real prop- erty due to the repairs or improvements to the property. Only property located within a reinvestment
Tagged Passions:business, abatement, property, taxes, commercial, Taxes, development, jobs, property tax, economic development, Development, and grant

zone is eligible for a tax abatement agreement. During this past quarter, there were no approved tax

abatements. Enacted by the Texas Legislature in 1991, 380 Agreements let cities make loans and grants of public money to businesses or developers in return for building projects within the city. Cities often pay these

Tagged Passions:business, abatement, taxes, Taxes, and grant

grants from the increase in sales or property taxes generated by the project. During this past quarter,

there were no jobs created via 380 agreements. Please note that the information presented in this figure is updated quarterly based on the date the agreement was passed by City Council.
Tagged Passions:council, property, taxes, Taxes, jobs, property tax, sale, and grant

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 C-3 Page 31

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS The actual water and sewer cus- tomer billing revenues in Septem- ber were 10,275,754 and
Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, financial report, finance, sewer, and water

5,619,609 representing an in-

No additional detail provided

crease of 15.46 and 7.01 re-

spectively, compared to Septem- ber 2017 revenues. The aggregate water and sewer accounts totaled
Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, sewer, and water

15,895,363 for an increase of

12.33 . September consumption brought annualized revenue of 98,850,686

for water and 64,841,539 for sew-

er, totaling 163,692,225. This total represents an increase of 16.31 compared to last year s annual- ized revenue. Figure VIII represents the annual- ized billing history of water and sewer revenues for September
Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, history, sewer, and water

2014 through September 2018.

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 C-4

Tagged Passions:financial report and finance

In September, the City of Plano

pumped 1,763,080,000 gallons of

water from the North Texas Munici-

pal Water District (NTMWD). The minimum daily water pumpage was 41,590,000 gallons, which oc-
Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, and water

curred on Sunday, September 23rd.

Maximum daily pumpage was

80,720,000 gallons and occurred on

No additional detail provided

Tuesday, September 18th. This

month s average daily pumpage was 58,769,000 gallons. Figure VII shows the monthly actual local water consumption.

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, and water

Note: April 2016 consumption data

is unavailable due to a system con-

version in Customer and Utility Ser-

vices. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
Tagged Passions:utility and Utility

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 C-5

Figure X shows unemploy- ment rates for the US, the State of Texas, the Dallas- Plano-Irving Metropolitan
Tagged Passions:financial report, rates, and finance

Division, and the City of Pla-

no from September 2017 to

*Rates are not seasonally

adjusted and are provided by the Labor Market Ca- reer Information (LMCI) De-
Tagged Passions:rates and market

partment of the Texas Work-

force Commission. August revenue from hotel/motel occu- pancy tax was 771,151. This represents an
Tagged Passions:boards and commissions, taxes, Taxes, and hotel

increase of 39,971 or 5.42 compared to

August 2017. The average monthly reve-

nue for the past six months was 856,350,

an increase of 9.91 from the previous

year s average. The six-month average for

East Plano decreased to 160,532, the West Plano average increased to 574,622, and the Plano Pkwy average increased to

121,196 from the prior year.

Airbnb occupancy tax revenue received in the month of August was 114. The six month trend amount will not equal the hotel/motel taxes reported in the finan-
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, short-term rental, and hotel

cial section. The economic report is based

on the amount of taxes earned during a
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

month, while the financial report indicates

when the City received the tax. The West Plano average excludes the
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, financial report, and finance

Towneplace Suites; this hotel did not make

their occupancy tax payment prior to the CMFR submission deadline. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Figure XII represents the
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and hotel

percentage of sales price

to asking price for single family homes for the past year along with days on the market. The percentage of asking price was un- changed at 98 in Septem-
Tagged Passions:sale and market

ber 2017 and September

2018. Days on the market increased from 34 days in

Tagged Passions:market

September 2017 to 45 days

No additional detail provided

in September 2018.

Please note that the per-

centage of asking price

and number of days on the market can change signifi-
Tagged Passions:market

cantly from month to

month due to the location of the properties sold.

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 C-6

Figure XI shows the aver- age home selling price and percentage change for the
Tagged Passions:financial report and finance

City of Plano and four area

cities. The average sales

price in Plano has in- creased 22,187 from 383,855 in September 2017 compared to 406,042 in Please note that the aver- age sales price can change significantly from month to month due to the
Tagged Passions:sale

location of the properties

sold. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 C-7

Figure XIII shows the
Tagged Passions:financial report and finance

price per square foot for

the month of September in 2016, 2017, and 2018 for the City of Plano and

4
area cities. The price

per square foot in Plano

has increased 7 in Sep-

tember 2018 when com- pared to September 2017. Please note that the price per square foot can change significantly

from month to month

No additional detail provided

due to the location of

the properties sold. Figure XIV shows the av- erage price per square

foot in the City of Plano

over the last 3 years. SECTION D INVESTMENT REPORT
Tagged Passions:investment

City of Plano

Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report
Tagged Passions:financial report and finance

Funds of the City of Plano are invested in accordance with Chapter 2256 of the Public

Funds Investment Act. The Act clearly defines allowable investment instruments for local governments. The City of Plano Investment Policy incorporates the provisions of the Act and all investment transactions are executed in compliance with the Act and the Policy.
Tagged Passions:investment, compliance, policy, and funding

Metrics Current Month

Actual Fiscal YTD Prior Fiscal YTD Prior Fiscal Year Total Funds Invested (1) 5,967,988 200,596,282 221,068,406 221,068,406 Interest Received (2) 1,070,043 10,756,379 10,558,106 10,558,106
Tagged Passions:funding

Weighted Average Maturity (in

days) (3) 426 469 Modified Duration (4) 1.14 1.25 Average 2-Year T-Note Yield (5) 2.77 1.38

* See interest allocation footnote on Page C-3.

(1) Does not include funds on deposit earning a NOW rate, and/or moneys in investment pools or cash accounts. (2) Cash Basis. Amount does not include purchased interest.
Tagged Passions:investment, purchasing, and funding

(3) The length of time (expressed in days) until the average investment in the portfolio will mature. The Prior fiscal YTD col-

umn represents current month, prior year. (4) Expresses the measurable change in the value of the portfolio in response to a 100-basis-point (1 ) change in interest.

Tagged Passions:investment

(5) Compares 2018 to 2017 for the current month.

Month-to-Month Comparison Metrics August 2018 2018 Difference Portfolio Holding Period Yield 1.91 1.91 +0.00 (+0 Basis Points) Average 2-Year T-Note Yield 2.64 2.77 +0.13 (+13 Basis Points) INVESTMENT REPORT The two-year Treasury note yield increased throughout the month of September from 2.66 to 2.81 . Interest received during September totaled 1,070,043 and represents interest paid on maturing investments and cou-

Tagged Passions:investment

pon payments on investments. Interest allocation is based on average balances within each fund during the

month.

Tagged Passions:investment

As of September 30, a total of 516,646,311 was invested in the Treasury Fund. Of this amount, 94,371,403 was

General Obligation Bond Funds, 11,796,794 was Water and Sewer Bond Funds, and 410,478,114 was in the

remaining funds.

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, funding, sewer, bond, and water

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 D-1 Page 37

Tagged Passions:financial report and finance

*Does not take into consideration

callable issues that can, if called,

significantly shorten the Weighted Average Maturity.

INVESTMENT REPORT Years to Maturity* Book Value Total 4-5 0 0.00 Portfolio Maturity Schedule Figure I Type Book Value Total Investment Pools 81,017,610 14.98
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NOW Account 46,571,655 8.61

No additional detail provided

CD s/Fixed Term 61,956,682 11.45

Municipal Bond 195,009,480 36.04
Tagged Passions:bond

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 D-2

Portfolio Diversification Figure II
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Month Total Invested (End of Month)

Portfolio Yield of Securities Purchased*
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Maturities/ Sold/Called*

Weighted Ave. Mat. (Days)

of Securities *Does not include investment pool purchased or changes in bank account balances. Portfolio Statistics Figure IV

Tagged Passions:investment and purchasing

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 D-3

INVESTMENT REPORT Allocated Interest/Fund Balance Figure III
Tagged Passions:investment, financial report, and finance

Beginning Fund Allocated Interest Ending Fund of

Fund Balance 9/30/2018 Current Month Fiscal Y-T-D Balance 9/30/2018 Total

G.
O. Debt Services 6,545,615 3,138 327,714 6,548,753 1.27

Tagged Passions:services

9-1-1 Fees 17,542,874 8,403 167,109 17,551,277 3.40

Park Improvements 8,660,689 4,134 81,797 8,664,823 1.68 Street Drainage Improvements 31,717,979 15,255 315,293 31,733,234 6.14 Sewer CIP 15,710,504 7,603 159,327 15,718,107 3.04 Capital Maintenance 39,679,585 19,010 417,492 39,698,595 7.68 Water CIP 17,604,054 8,360 168,123 17,612,414 3.41 Water Sewer Operating 29,325,447 12,664 171,240 29,338,111 5.68 Information Services 4,629,544 2,221 59,495 4,631,765 0.90 Equipment Replacement 30,562,185 14,712 284,081 30,576,897 5.92 Health Claims 24,157,026 11,541 461,896 24,168,567 4.68 Traffic Safety 12,488,924 5,916 115,268 12,494,840 2.42
Tagged Passions:health, parks, services, 911, utility, Utility, streets, capital spending, Capital Spending, equipment, sewer, traffic, stormwater, and water

Water Sewer Bond Funds 11,791,098 5,696 62,465 11,796,794 2.28

Econ. Dev. Incentive Fund 48,156,945 22,960 487,084 48,179,905 9.33

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, funding, sewer, bond, incentive, and water

Other 73,207,602 34,529 669,113 73,242,131 14.16

G.
O. Bond Funds 94,325,531 45,872 714,668 94,371,403 18.27

Footnote: All City funds not restricted or held in trust are included in the Treasury Pool. As of September 30, 2018 allocated interest to these funds include an adjustment to fair value as required by GASB 31. August, 2017 546,698,473 1.21 13 9 424 90 September, 2017 498,815,454 1.26 5 2 469 93 October, 2017 483,878,081 1.29 2 1 463 94 November, 2017 471,855,619 1.30 0 2 450 92 December, 2017 507,702,273 1.30 0 1 394 91 January, 2018 567,887,323 1.37 1 2 338 90 February, 2018 590,597,674 1.44 2 6 337 86 March, 2018 566,894,362 1.62 10 7 452 89 April, 2018 542,132,716 1.65 0 1 449 88 May, 2018 612,157,289 1.79 2 7 460 83 June, 2018 595,054,093 1.88 2 7 539 78 July, 2018 586,617,203 1.92 2 8 546 72 August, 2018 550,138,041 1.91 0 7 488 65 September, 2018 541,007,580 1.91 2 4 426 63 The annualized average portfolio for September 30, 2018 was 551,326,854. This is an increase of 1,251,276 when compared to the Sep- tember 2017 average of 550,075,578. INVESTMENT REPORT Figure V shows a breakdown of the

Tagged Passions:investment, funding, and bond

various sources of funds for the City s

Treasury Pool as of September 30,

Tagged Passions:funding

2018. The largest category is the

Bond Funds in the amount of
Tagged Passions:funding and bond

189,769,094. Closest behind are the

Enterprise Funds with a total of 97,919,240 and the Special Reve- nue Funds with a total of 93,877,788.

Tagged Passions:funding

City of Plano * Comprehensive Monthly Financial Report * September 2018 D-4

Annualized Average Portfolio Figure VI Page 40
Tagged Passions:financial report and finance

CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: CAPTION Discussion and direction re: Los Rios Golf Course FINANCIAL SUMMARY FUND(S): COMMENTS:
Tagged Passions:golf and finance

SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
Tagged Passions:strategic

ATTACHMENTS: Description Upload Date Type Memo 11/7/2018 Memo

Page 41 Memorandum

Date: October 26, 2018

To: Mark Israelson, Senior Deputy City Manager

Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

From: Robin Reeves, Director of Parks and Recreation

Tagged Passions:parks and recreation

Subject: Los Rios Golf Course Lifetime Memberships

The City purchased Los Rios Golf Course in 2014 for 3,500,000 from Golf Addicks LLC. Golf Addicks was a willing seller. The real estate contract included a lease agreement for the City to lease the course back to Golf Addicks for five years with a one year renewal option. The real estate contract and lease agreement were approved by City Council on July 28, 2014. The City has no other agreements with Golf Addicks LLC. The purchased closed on October 7, 2014. The City s intention at the time of purchase was to use the property as a public park. The City had no intentions of operating it as a golf course. The initial 5-year term of the lease agreement was scheduled to end on October 7, 2019. The current operator of the course has closed the course and has stated that he is no longer financially able to operate the course. Parks and Recreation staff have taken over maintenance of the property. Prior to the closing of the course parks staff began receiving complaints that the course was not being maintained properly. The Property Standards Division had also received similar complaints. Over the years, some area residents were sold lifetime memberships to the course. Records from 2009 indicate that 62 lifetime memberships had been sold up to that time. Highest paid - 21,645 Lowest paid - 5,000 Earliest sold in 1991 Latest sold in 2009 Our current understanding is that there were 28 active lifetime memberships at the time the course closed at the beginning of October 2018.
Tagged Passions:parks, council, leasing, property, contract, purchasing, golf, and recreation

The real estate contract for purchase of the property includes the following: 12. (e) Seller shall terminate all memberships, including lifetime or otherwise, associated with the Property prior to termination of the Lease Term, so that there will be no entitlement by anyone other than the City to use or occupy the property. Seller shall indemnify and hold harmless the City against any claims, disputes, litigation, or other contested matters regarding the lifetime or other club memberships as provided in Section 13, so long as the City does not operate the Property as a golf course after the Lease Term.

There are no other provisions in the real estate contract or lease agreement concerning the lifetime memberships. The City did not provide any additional funding to the seller beyond the purchase price for any purpose including the purpose of buying out lifetime memberships. Page 42
Tagged Passions:leasing, property, contract, legal, purchasing, golf, and funding

Subject: Los Rios Golf Course Lifetime Memberships Page 2

Some alternatives in relation to the remaining lifetime memberships include:
Tagged Passions:golf

1.
The City could chose to do nothing.

2.
The City could chose to offer some level of discounted or free golf at Pecan Hollow Golf Course.

Weekday rounds would have the least impact on course revenues. The Weekday Senior rate at Pecan Hollow Golf Course is a 16 green fee with a 17 cart fee. The green fee goes to the City and the cart fee goes to the golf pro under contract with the City and the golf pro is the owner of the golf carts. Carts are strongly encouraged but not required on weekdays but from what we can tell most seniors use a cart. If we offer free carts we would need to reimburse the golf pro. Staff does not believe free carts is a good option. Assuming half of the lifetime memberships are still active, 31 active lifetime memberships with free weekday green fees at 16/round for one (1) round each would equal 496. Twelve (12) free green fees each would equal 12 rounds x 16/round x 31 lifetime members = 5,952. That is essentially one free round per month for one year. We would need to determine what constitutes proof of a Los Rios Golf Course lifetime membership. As you know the golf fund is tight due to excessive rains the last few years. Since September 1, the course has only been open for two weeks due to rain and the aftermath of flooding on the course. If Pecan Hollow Golf Course continues to have a revenue deficit due to the impact of excessive rains and the shortfall is offset by the General Fund, then at least some of these free rounds would likely be offset by General Fund dollars. In the 2017 Bond Election 3,000,000 was included to convert Los Rios Golf Course to a park and to provide some basic improvements to make it useable for park purposes. Staff has had three meetings with area residents concerning plans for the future park. A fourth meeting has been scheduled for November 13. Page 43
Tagged Passions:flooding, parks, contract, golf, voting, bond, election, and seniors

CITY OF PLANO COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM

Department: City Secretary Department Head: Agenda Coordinator: CAPTION Housing Trends Analysis and Strategic Plan FINANCIAL SUMMARY FUND(S): COMMENTS:
Tagged Passions:strategic, finance, and housing

SUMMARY OF ITEM

Strategic Plan Goal: Plano Tomorrow Plan Pillar:
Tagged Passions:strategic

ATTACHMENTS: Description Upload Date Type Memo 11/7/2018 Memo Final Report 11/7/2018 Informational

Page 44 Memorandum

Date: November 1, 2018

To: Bruce Glasscock, City Manager

Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

From: Lori Schwarz, Director of Neighborhood Services

Tagged Passions:services and neighborhood

Subject: Housing Trends Analysis and Strategic Plan

Summary The Housing Trends Analysis and Strategic Plan process was initiated in March 2018 with the assistance of an Advisory Committee and consultant team. Over the last nine months, there was significant input from the community regarding housing issues and in-depth analysis of existing housing trends and market conditions. The final draft of the Plan has been completed for review, consideration, and direction by City Council. Background Although the City has important foundational documents such as the Housing Value and Retention Analysis, the Consolidated Plan, and the Planning Department s Annual Housing Study, there was not detailed information on the types of housing products that are missing or underrepresented in Plano. There was also a need for better understanding of the current and projected target markets seeking or needing these residential products. The Neighborhood Conservation Policy in the Plano Tomorrow comprehensive plan included a strategic action to study current housing options, identify gaps in the housing inventory and formulate recommendations to address deficiencies. In FY2016-17, City Council approved funding to initiate the Housing Trends Analysis and Strategic Plan to meet this action. Economic Planning Systems (EPS) was chosen as the consultant to develop this Plan in November 2017.

Tagged Passions:council, strategic, services, policy, grocery, neighborhood, funding, Conservation, market, housing, and planning

Council approved the use of a citizen advisory committee in February 2018, which included Council appointees as well as board and commission members, and community stakeholders. As described in the Council presentation, the plan objectives are as follows:

Understand the housing needs of Plano s residents; Prepare for future growth and development; and Guide Community Investment and Sustainable development. Throughout the process, input was obtained from community partners including: local business representatives, neighborhood leaders, housing developers, housing advocates, and members of the finance and lending industries. A citywide survey was utilized to gain input from those that live and/or work within Plano regarding their housing preferences and future housing needs. Additionally, the Advisory Committee played an integral role in reviewing and providing feedback on both the primary and secondary data examined throughout the Plan development. The eighteen-member advisory group met five times over the course of a nine-month period and engaged in active and insightful conversations centered on housing issues. The group represented a wide range of thoughts and Page 45 perspectives. Although advisory in nature, the Committee wished to share their recommendations to City Council for addressing housing challenges identified in the plan. Their recommendations are summarized below. The City is encouraged to:
Tagged Passions:council, business, boards and commissions, investment, development, neighborhood, growth, finance, housing, and Development

Be specific and intentional about the tools that may be used to address the housing concerns highlighted in the report;

Include mixed-income housing (rental and ownership) for the redevelopment of Collin Creek Mall, the Oak Point area, and four-corner retail; Strike a balance between housing types across the spectrum; Assemble land for the purpose of redevelopment that includes workforce housing; and Create a public-facing campaign for the down payment assistance program and consider expanding the program for the workforce, such as Fire, Police, Teachers, and other Government employees. Next Steps Staff is seeking direction from City Council on next steps to utilize the Plan findings, consider development of housing policies, and explore available tools to address the specific housing challenges identified. xc: Jack Carr, Deputy City Manager Shanette Eaden, Housing and Community Services Manager Page 46 Final Report

Tagged Passions:council, rental, services, administrator, commercial, public safety, manager, development, workforce, housing, Development, and program

City of Plano Housing Trends Analysis

Prepared for: City of Plano Neighborhood Services Department
Tagged Passions:services, neighborhood, and housing

Prepared by: Economic Planning Systems, Inc. Pavlik Associates

EPS 173070 Page 47 Page 48 Acknowledgements In addition to the many residents who participated in meetings and outreach and otherwise, the project team would like to thank the following people for contributing to this work: Advisory Group Daniel Eng David Smith Dinesh Pai Earnest Burke Glenn Callison Holland Hernandez Joe Camarena John Paulson Judy Drotman Kelly Martin Lynn Ellis Mary Alice Garza Melissa Hailey Paul Gerber Raj Menon Randy McDowell Shep Stahel Teresa Tong Trae Williams
Tagged Passions:planning

Plano Residents and Neighborhood Leaders 3,359 residents and workers in Plano that completed a survey Daniel Butler Margaret Fitch Robert Miller Joe Morales Will Tarrant Nicole Threadgill Kisha Voss Pam Royle Barbara Oldenburg

Business Community Elyse Owens, Front Burner Steve Smith, Legacy Food Hall Michael Herman, Capital One Joe Bolash, Hilton Granite Park Donny Kalluvilayil, Children s Health Plano Texas Health Resources Plano

Tagged Passions:health, parks, business, hotel, and neighborhood

Housing Advocates - Developers Steve Brown, Karl Franklin Homes Ellen Rourke, National Housing Advisors Frank Turner, Urban Opportunity, LLC Tom Field, CT Creekside Partners Daniel Smith, Ojala Holdings Dan Allgeier, Lakewood Management

Housing Advocates - Nonprofits Rick Crocker, Samaritan Inn Robin LeoGrande, Community for Permanent Supported Housing Jaqueline Reindl, Hopes Door New Beginnings Center Isabel Camacho, Hopes Door New Beginning Center Mona Kafeel, Texas Muslim Women s Foundation Sheri Messer, City House Jennifer Lajoie, City House
Tagged Passions:hotel and housing

Banking/Finance Industry Mike Denton, University Lending Group Cassy Humberger, University Lending Group Jon Humberger, University Lending Group Camille Ussery, BTH Bank Eric Allen, Great Western Home Lending Julie Shrell, Commerce Home Mortgage Derric Hicks, Legacy Texas Bank

Tagged Passions:university and finance

Organizations Asian American Chamber of Commerce Collin County Collin County Association of Realtors Collin County Black Chamber of Commerce Greater Dallas Apartment Association Plano Chamber of Commerce Plano Independent School District Tri-County Regional Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Tagged Passions:education

City Executive Leadership Bruce Glasscock, City Manager Jack Carr, Deputy City Manager (Development Services)

Mayor City Council Mayor Harry LaRosiliere Mayor Pro Tem Ron Kelley Deputy Mayor Pro Tem Angela Miner Council Member Anthony Ricciardelli Council Member Rick Grady Council Member Kayci Prince Council Member Tom Harrison Council Member Rick Smith

Tagged Passions:council, services, administrator, manager, development, and Development

Neighborhood Services Department Lori Schwarz, Director of Neighborhood Services Shanette Eaden, Housing Community Services Manager Tiffany Tononi McNamara, Neighborhood Engagement Manager

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services, manager, neighborhood, and housing

Consultant Team Andrew Knudtsen, Managing Principal (EPS) David Schwartz, Executive Vice President (EPS) Rachel Shindman, Associate (EPS) Linda Pavlik, President (Pavlik Associates)

Page 49 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Page 50
Tagged Passions:services

Table of Contents

1.
Executive Summary .......................................................................................... 1

Background .............................................................................................................. 1 Housing is Integral to the Economy ............................................................................. 2 Housing Issues and Challenges in Plano ....................................................................... 3 Summary of Findings ................................................................................................. 5 Conclusions ............................................................................................................ 15 Case Studies .......................................................................................................... 23 Policy Direction ....................................................................................................... 29

Tagged Passions:policy, housing, and economy

2.
Demand Trends .............................................................................................. 33

Employment ........................................................................................................... 33 Population and Households ....................................................................................... 43 Stated Preferences .................................................................................................. 56

Tagged Passions:employment

3.
Supply Trends ............................................................................................... 103

Housing Affordability ............................................................................................. 111

Tagged Passions:housing

4.
Policy Context ............................................................................................... 121

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:policy

Summary of Findings ............................................................................................. 121 Existing Regulation ................................................................................................ 122 Case Studies ........................................................................................................ 133 Development-Based Approaches ............................................................................. 142 Community-Based Approaches ............................................................................... 149 Organizational Infrastructure .................................................................................. 154 Policy Direction ..................................................................................................... 160

A p p e n d i x A : R e s i d e n t / W o r k f o r c e S u r v e y .............................................. 165 Open-Ended Responses ......................................................................................... 174 A p p e n d i x B : A d v i s o r y G r o u p S u r v e y ...................................................... 223 Survey................................................................................................................. 224 A p p e n d i x C : M e e t i n g / F o c u s G r o u p T o p i c s ............................................. 229
Tagged Passions:policy, development, regulation, and Development

Survey Instrument ................................................................................................ 230 Public Meeting ...................................................................................................... 234

Page 51 List of Figures Figure 1 Case Study City Conditions .............................................................................. 24 Figure 2 Summary of Case Study Policy Mechanisms ....................................................... 27

Tagged Passions:policy

Figure 3 Wage Salary Employment, Dallas-Ft. Worth CMSA ........................................... 33

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:employment

Figure 4 Wage Salary Employment, City of Plano ......................................................... 34

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:employment

Figure 5 Wage Salary Employment, Indexed to 2002 .................................................... 34

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:employment

Figure 6 Plano Employment Growth, 2002-2015 (2017 Metro Area Average Wage).............. 36

Figure 7 Shift in Employed Population by Age, Dallas-Ft. Worth CMSA ............................... 37 Figure 8 Shift in Employed Population by Age, City of Plano .............................................. 38 Figure 9 Plano Jobs by Industry and Commuting, 2002 .................................................... 39 Figure 10 Plano Jobs by Industry and Commuting, 2015 .................................................... 40 Figure 11 Plano Jobs by Location, 2015 ........................................................................... 41 Figure 12 Employment (2005) and Roadway Congestion (2007) ......................................... 42 Figure 13 Employment (2015) and Roadway Congestion (2017) ......................................... 42 Figure 14 Dallas-Ft. Worth CMSA Population ..................................................................... 43 Figure 15 City of Plano Population ................................................................................... 44 Figure 16 City Population as of CMSA .......................................................................... 44
Tagged Passions:Public Transit, jobs, growth, traffic, and employment

Figure 17 Indexed MSA City Population Growth .............................................................. 45

Figure 18 Shift in Population by Age, Dallas-Ft. Worth CMSA .............................................. 46 Figure 19 Shift in Population by Age, City of Plano ............................................................ 47 Figure 20 CMSA Population Change by Age ...................................................................... 47 Figure 21 City Population Change by Age ......................................................................... 48
Tagged Passions:growth

Figure 22 Consumer Price Index ..................................................................................... 49

Figure 23 Household Income, 2005-2017 ......................................................................... 50 Figure 24 Total Households by Area Median Income, 2005 ................................................. 51 Figure 25 Total Households by Area Median Income, 2016 ................................................. 52 Figure 26 Shift in Households by Income, 2005-16 ............................................................ 53

Figure 27 Residential Mortgage Lending Conditions, 2005-17 ............................................. 54

Figure 28 Owner Households with and without Mortgage, City of Plano ................................ 55

Figure 29 Respondents by Zip Code................................................................................. 57

Figure 30 Respondents by Length of Time in Current Residence .......................................... 58

Page 52 List of Figures (cont.)

Figure 31 Respondents by Age by Length of Time in Current Residence ............................... 59

Figure 32 Number of Persons per Household by Age Group ................................................ 59

Figure 33 Respondents by Household Type ....................................................................... 60

Figure 34 Respondents by Year Born ............................................................................... 61

Figure 35 Respondents by Household Type by Age ............................................................ 61

Figure 36 Other Household Type Responses ................................................................... 62

Figure 37 Respondents by Tenure ................................................................................... 62

Figure 38 Respondents by Tenure by Age ......................................................................... 63

Figure 39 Respondents by Type of Current Residence ........................................................ 63

Figure 40 Respondents by Age by Type of Current Residence ............................................. 64

Figure 41 Respondents by Work Status ............................................................................ 65

Figure 42 Other Responses to Work Status .................................................................... 66

Figure 43 Respondents by Primary Job in Plano ................................................................ 66

Figure 44 Respondents by Age by Primary Job in Plano ...................................................... 67

Figure 45 Respondents by Primary Job Industry ................................................................ 68

Figure 46 Respondents by Household Income ................................................................... 69


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