VA - Fairfax County: FAIRFAX COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

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FAIRFAX COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

AGENDA Fairfax County Board of Supervisors

Health, Housing Human Services Committee May 8, 2018 3:00pm 4:30pm Government Center Room 11

Meeting called by Supervisor Hudgins Attendees: Fairfax County Board of Supervisors Please read: Handouts will be provided at the meeting
Tagged Passions:health, services, and housing

3:00 - 3:05pm HHHS Committee Chairman s Opening Remarks and Agenda Review

Supervisor Hudgins, Chairman of the Health, Housing and Human Services Committee and Hunter Mill District Supervisor
Tagged Passions:health, services, and housing

3:05 - 4:05pm Update on Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan / Status Report on the Office to Prevent and End Homelessness

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:strategic and housing

Tom Fleetwood, Director, Department of Housing and Community Development

Kerrie Wilson, Co-Chair, Affordable Housing Advisory Committee Dean Klein, Director, Office to Prevent and End Homelessness Julie Maltzman, Office to Prevent and End Homelessness
Tagged Passions:development, Development, housing, and community development

4:05 - 4:20pm Home Child Care Facilities Ordinance

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:ordinance and Child Care

Nannette Bowler, Director, Department of Family Services

Tagged Passions:services and family services

Anne-Marie Twohie, Director, Office for Children, Department of Family Services

Jene Moore, Office for Children, Department of Family Services
Tagged Passions:services and family services

4:20 - 4:30pm Update on Head Start/Early Head Start

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:poverty, family services, and preschool

Nannette Bowler, Director, Department of Family Services

Tagged Passions:services and family services

Anne-Marie Twohie, Director, Office for Children, Department of Family Services

Jennifer Branch, Office for Children, Department of Family Services
Tagged Passions:services and family services

Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan

Phase I Kerrie Wilson, Co-Chair Affordable Housing Advisory Committee Tom Fleetwood, Director Fairfax County Department of Housing and Community Development

Tagged Passions:development, strategic, Development, and housing

Health, Housing, and Human Services Committee

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:health, services, and housing

Why a Strategic Plan for Housing

Tagged Passions:strategic and housing

2
Fairfax County, based on job growth and demographic evolution, needs more housing of all types for all incomes

Wage growth is not keeping pace with the cost of housing, and low and moderate income families are falling further behind
Tagged Passions:growth and housing

To be the kind of community and economy we want to be, Fairfax County needs the people who need homes that are affordable

Background
Tagged Passions:economy

3
Developed at the direction of the Board of Supervisors, on recommendation by former Deputy County Executive Pat Harrison

The Affordable Housing Advisory Committee (AHAC), in partnership with the Department of Housing and Community Development, have led the development of the draft plan

Intended to be a community plan not a staff or agency plan A draft of the plan was sent to the Board in early April Background
Tagged Passions:development, Development, housing, and community development

4
The Plan was intended to identify housing that would be needed in Fairfax County in the next 5/10/15 years, and identify policies and programs to address that need

Plan separated into two segments: Phase I Report provides immediate strategies that can be undertaken with existing county resources Phase II will be a long-term resource plan Phase I Report

Tagged Passions:program and housing

5
Makes the case for more price-appropriate housing in terms of economic development and social equity

Describes the current and future housing needs; at a variety of incomes but with particular attention to vulnerable populations and the workforce Provides strategies that come directly from work done by AHAC over the last few years Connection to County Priorities
Tagged Passions:development, workforce, Development, housing, and economic development

6
Direct connection to the Strategic Plan to Facilitate the Economic Success of Fairfax

County Promotes equity One Fairfax Housing Blueprint Affirms that housing is a continuum of need Preventing and ending homelessness Needs and Targets
Tagged Passions:grocery, strategic, and housing

7
The average rent in Fairfax County is more than 1,700

No additional detail provided

Between 2010 and 2015, increases in rents have outstripped income growth 17 to 10

More than 115,000 individuals who are housing cost burdened; greater than the total population of 90 percent of Virginia counties Needs and Targets

Tagged Passions:grocery, growth, and housing

8
Bottom line:

31,000 families in Fairfax County earning 80 AMI and below are currently cost burdened 40,000 new units needed by 2032 for households earning up to 120 AMI, including: o 4,600 units for families below 30 AMI o 8,500 units for families between 30 and 50 AMI Needs and Targets
Tagged Passions:grocery

9
Investments of public funds and land; Partnerships and land use policy

Partnerships and land use policy Market solutions Fairfax County Community Members Next Year Next 5 Years Next 10 Years Next 15 Years Ex tr
Tagged Passions:investment, policy, market, and funding

e
m

el y Lo w In co m e A M I Seniors and persons with disabilities living on SSI, Social Security or other fixed incomes.

Tagged Passions:seniors and security

Low-wage workers, including many retail,

hospitality, restaurant workers, health care, and child care workers. V er y Lo

Tagged Passions:health, restaurants, and Child Care

w
In

co m

e
3 0

t o

5
0

A M I Seniors and persons with disabilities on fixed incomes. Families with one person working in business
Tagged Passions:seniors and business

support services, construction, or teacher s aide.

Families with two workers in the retail, hospitality, child care and some health care jobs. Lo w In co m e
Tagged Passions:health, services, Child Care, construction, and jobs

5
0

0
A M

I M o d er a te I n co m

e
8 0

No additional detail provided

0
0

A M I H ig h er I n co m

e
1 00

t o

1
20

A M I Families with one or two workers in entry- or

mid-level jobs, including police officers, fire

fighters, and school teachers, as well as workers

Tagged Passions:education, public safety, and jobs

in professional and business services,

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services and business

technology, non-profit, and health care jobs.

H ig h er In co m e

Tagged Passions:health, Technology, technology, and jobs

1
20

+ A M I Families with one or two workers in entry- or

mid-level jobs, including police officers, fire

fighters, and school teachers, as well as workers

Tagged Passions:education, public safety, and jobs

in professional and business services,

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services and business

technology, non-profit, and health care jobs.

1,289 6,445 16,141 22,585 Total New Housing Units Needed 3,152 15,756 46,430 62,184 New Households Needing Housing in Fairfax County

Tagged Passions:health, Technology, technology, housing, and jobs

Some seniors living on retirement income.

Families with one or two workers in entry-level jobs in professional and technical services, or in mid-career jobs in health care, education, construction, and the non-profit sector. Families with one or two workers in entry- or
Tagged Passions:health, education, services, retirement, construction, seniors, and jobs

mid-level jobs, including police officers, fire

fighters, and school teachers, as well as workers

Tagged Passions:education, public safety, and jobs

in professional and business services,

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services and business

technology, non-profit, and health care jobs.

4,591 Next 15 Years 8,443 5,588 9,048 11,929 22,585 62,184 3,550 6,500 4,365 6,814 9,060 16,141 46,430 Next 10 Years Strategies

Tagged Passions:health, Technology, technology, and jobs

10
Phase I approach is to identify low/no cost solutions to increase production of a range of homes that are affordable

25
total strategies recommended which can be achieved in the short to medium term

Focus on four areas: Modernizing FCRHA/HCD Administration and Processes Land Use and Zoning Considerations Funding Sources and Uses Housing for Vulnerable Populations Strategies Highlights: FCRHA/HCD Modernization

Tagged Passions:funding, housing, and zoning

11
Highlights of recommendations

Streamline Housing Blueprint application process to better align with state tax credit and other state funding processes Examine FCRHA subsidy programs to better align resources to serve those most in need

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, program, funding, and housing

Incorporate One Fairfax into the FCRHA s policymaking process

Strategies Highlights: Land Use and Zoning Considerations

Tagged Passions:zoning

12
Highlights of recommendations

Update ADU/WDU programs to provide more housing opportunities for the workforce Create guidelines for adaptive re-use of commercial space for affordable housing Develop a new preservation strategy Strategy Highlights: Funding Sources and Uses

Tagged Passions:commercial, strategic, workforce, preservation, program, funding, and housing

13
Highlights of recommendations

Preserve existing affordable housing funding resources Assess a commercial contribution policy Increase homeownership opportunities by providing down payment and closing cost assistance Strategy Highlights: Housing For Vulnerable Populations

Tagged Passions:commercial, policy, strategic, funding, and housing

14
Highlights of recommendations

No additional detail provided

Expand access to housing options for persons with special needs

Support aging in place Continue to address the efficiency of Fairfax County s existing homeless and housing supports network

Tagged Passions:government efficiency, housing, and homeless

15
Next Steps

No additional detail provided

16
Request Board endorsement of Phase I Plan at upcoming meeting

Begin implementation of Phase I strategies; those requiring Board approval will be brought forward individually Incorporate Phase II work into planned Countywide Strategic Plan led by County Executive Bryan Hill Questions/Comments

Tagged Passions:strategic

17
Investments of public funds and land; Partnerships and land use policy

Partnerships and land use policy Market solutions Fairfax County Community Members Next Year Next 5 Years Next 10 Years Next 15 Years Ex tr em el y Lo

Tagged Passions:investment, policy, market, and funding

w
In

co m

e
<3

No additional detail provided

0
A

M I Seniors and persons with disabilities living on SSI, Social Security or other fixed incomes. Low-wage workers, including many retail, hospitality, restaurant workers, health care, and child care workers.
Tagged Passions:health, restaurants, Child Care, seniors, and security

208 1,041 3,550 4,591 Ve

ry Lo

w
In

co m

e
30

No additional detail provided

0
A

M I Seniors and persons with disabilities on fixed incomes. Families with one person working in business support services, construction, or teacher s aide. Families with two workers in the retail, hospitality, child care and some health care jobs. Lo w In co m e 50 to
Tagged Passions:health, services, Child Care, construction, seniors, business, and jobs

8
0

A M I M od er at

e
In

co m

e
80

00 A M I Hi gh

er In

co m

e
10

0 to

1
20

A M I Families with one or two workers in entry- or mid-level jobs, including police officers, fire fighters, and school teachers, as well as workers in professional and business services, technology, non-profit, and health care jobs. Hi gh
Tagged Passions:health, education, public safety, services, Technology, technology, business, and jobs

er In

co m

e
12

No additional detail provided

0
+

AM I Families with one or two workers in entry- or

mid-level jobs, including police officers, fire fighters, and school teachers, as well as workers in professional and business services, technology, non-profit, and health care jobs.

1,289 6,445 16,141 22,585 Total New Housing Units Needed 3,152 15,756 46,430 62,184 New Households Needing Housing in Fairfax County

Tagged Passions:health, education, public safety, services, Technology, technology, housing, business, and jobs

Some seniors living on retirement income. Families with one or two workers in entry-level jobs in professional and technical services, or in mid-career jobs in health care, education, construction, and the non-profit sector.

Families with one or two workers in entry- or mid-level jobs, including police officers, fire fighters, and school teachers, as well as workers in professional and business services, technology, non-profit, and health care jobs. 4,591 Next 15 Years 8,443 5,588 9,048 11,929 22,585 62,184 3,550 6,500 4,365 6,814 9,060 16,141 46,430 Next 10 Years Needs and Targets
Tagged Passions:health, education, public safety, services, Technology, grocery, retirement, technology, construction, seniors, business, and jobs

UP TO 6 MONTHS

UP TO 12 MONTHS

UP TO 24 MONTHS DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION PARTNERS

DESCRIPTION PARTNERS

A1: Streamline the Housing Blueprint Application Process

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing

A6: Incorporate the One Fairfax Policy into FCRHA s Policymaking Process

FCRHA FCRHA CEX A5: Examine FCRHA s Deep Subsidy Programs
Tagged Passions:policy and program

A4: Develop a Plan to Expand Use of FCRHA Bonds

FCRHA AHAC FCRHA OPEH/GB

Tagged Passions:bond

DPZ/PC

NCS DFS CSB OPEH/GB FCRHA CA

DPZ/PC

AHAC DPZ/PC

DPZ/PC

C6: Provide Downpayment and Closing Cost Assistance

DPZ/PC

FCRHA PARTNERS*

DPZ/PC

FCRHA AHAC FCRHA AHAC DFS CSB

Phase 1 Strategy Completion Schedule

KEY KEY KEY B3: Develop a Preservation Strategy
Tagged Passions:strategic and preservation

B5: Incorporate Guidelines for Public Land into the Capital Improvement Program (CIP)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:capital spending, Capital Spending, and program

COMMUNITYWIDE HOUSING STRATEGIC PLAN

C4: Explore Using Existing Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) Policies to Promote Housing Affordability D3: Facilitate Opportunities for Faith Communities to Develop Affordable Housing
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, TIF, strategic, and housing

D4: Continue to Address the Efficiency of Fairfax County s Existing Homeless and Housing Support Networks

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:government efficiency, housing, and homeless

C1: Preserve Existing Affordable Housing Resources

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing

C5: Expand the Scope of Local Rental Housing Subsidy

Tagged Passions:rental and housing

A2: Maximize the Potential of FCRHA-Owned Properties

A3: Plan for Reinvestment of Savings from Refinancing of Wedgewood and Crescent

DFS CSB

C2: Create Guidelines for Tysons Housing Fund

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing

D2: Support Aging in Place

DPZ/PC

FCRHA

B4: Streamline the Process for Public-Private Partnerships Using Publicly-Owned Land

OPEH/GB

CA

DPZ/PC

C7: Review Options for Restructuring Housing Trust Fund
Tagged Passions:housing

B1: Update the Affordable Dwelling Unit (ADU) and Workforce Dwelling Unit (WDU) Programs

Tagged Passions:workforce and program

B2: Create Guidelines for Adaptive Reuse of Commercial Space

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:commercial

B6: Modify the Accessory Dwelling Unit Policy

B7: Explore Zoning Districts that Allow for Missing Middle Housing
Tagged Passions:policy, housing, and zoning

D1: Expand Access to Housing Options for Persons with Special Needs

DESCRIPTION PARTNERS
Tagged Passions:housing

DPZ/PC

*Key Partners: HCD is the coordinating agency for each Strategy. Listed partners are entities that are anticipated to have an active role in the implementation of the specific Strategy. Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority (FCRHA) Office of the County Executive (CEX) Affordable Housing Advisory Committee (AHAC) Department of Planning and Zoning and/or Planning Commission (DPZ/PC) County Attorney (CA) Department of Family Services (DFS) Community Services Board (CSB) Office to Prevent and End Homelessness and/or Governing Board of the Fairfax-Falls Church Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness (OPEH/GB) Department of Neighborhood and Community Services (NCS) Office of Community Revitalization (OCR)

C3: Assess a Commercial Contribution Policy B8: Integration with the Zoning Ordinance Modernization Project DPZ OCR KEY
Tagged Passions:church, legal, policy, boards and commissions, services, ordinance, family services, strategic, housing, neighborhood, planning, and zoning

GoalS: DRAFT HOUSING BLUEPRINT: At a glance FY 2019

Need NEW UNITS DEVELOPED To End Homelessness in Ten Years (December 2018): 2,650 UNITS/OPPORTUNITIES NEEDED
Tagged Passions:housing

To Provide Affordable Housing Options to Special Needs Population

Tagged Passions:housing

To Increase Workforce Housing through Creative Partnerships

and Public Policy New PROGRAM ADMISSIONS/Turnover 150 323 655 350 FCRHA Fairfax County Rental Program: FCRHA Federal Resources: Bridging Affordability: Non-profit acquisitions/federal resources: 5 Workforce Dwelling Units (WDUs) (estimate): Affordable Dwelling Units (ADUs) (estimate): 300 50 BLUEPRINT PROJECT ON THE HORIZON FY 2019 Targets A WA RD WINNING housing blueprint
Tagged Passions:policy, rental, grocery, workforce, program, and housing

A
ordable Housing Advisory Committee Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority Fairfax-Falls Church Community Partnership on Ending Homelessness Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board Disability Services Board

Cross-Cutting Initiatives
Tagged Passions:church, disability, services, and housing

FCRHA Federal Resources: Bridging Affordability:

99 78

5
Meet the Affordable Housing Needs of Low Income Working Families

Tagged Passions:housing

According to the 2017 Point in Time survey, there were 964 people who were literally homeless in the Fairfax-Falls Church community. This represents a 9 percent reduction from the number counted in January 2015, or 95 less people. The total decrease in the homeless population from 2008 to 2017 is 47 percent, which represents 871 less people homeless on one night in January 2017 than were counted in January 2008. Ten Year Goal is 2,650 housing opportunities; through FY 2015, a total of 1,032 opportunities have been created through new housing development, new subsidy sources, and turnover in existing resources.

Tagged Passions:church, development, Development, housing, and homeless

36
45 54

With Federal Funding: New Private Partner 100-unit Acquisition or Construction Goal of 10 percent to serve former homeless households 10 units Possible inclusion of Project Based Vouchers (if available)

Tagged Passions:construction, funding, and homeless

Route 50/West Ox (Sully District) Permanent supportive emergency housing Shelter rebuild/renovation and possible permanent supportive housing through bond referendum Reevaluation of Bridging Affordability program relative to serving people coming out of homelessness and with special needs

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:bond, program, housing, referendum, and emergency

Implementation of Diversion First Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan Identify new funding opportunities for affordable housing development Sustainable housing work group and report card Homelessness Strategic Plan Work with Building Repurposing workgroup

Tagged Passions:development, strategic, Development, funding, and housing

CSB: 2011 report identified housing needs for 1600 customers in total Other High Priorities Seniors Domestic Violence Victims Large Families/Extremely Low Incomes Persons with Physical and/or Sensory Disabilities

Persons with physical/sensory disabilities: Persons with CSB eligible disabilities: Households leaving domestic violence situations
Tagged Passions:domestic violence, seniors, and housing

State Rental Assistance Program: Construction of new Lewinsville Senior facility (Dranesville District):

Tagged Passions:rental, program, construction, and facility

9
10

9
12Non-Profits: Federally-Funded Group Home Beds:

350 58 162 New Private Partner 100-unit Acquisition or Construction Goal of 10 percent to serve persons with special needs 10 units Possible inclusion of Project Based Vouchers (if available) New Private Partner 100-unit Acquisition or Construction 8,000,000 Goal of approximately 80 units
Tagged Passions:construction

Residences at North Hill Park (Mount Vernon District) 60 units Oakwood site (Lee District) approximately 120 units of senior housing Domestic violence shelter expansion South County Little River Glen campus expansion (Braddock District) approximately 60 units of senior housing One University (Braddock District) approximately 60 units Arden project (Mount Vernon District) - (pending funding and tax-credit award) - approximately 8 units

Tagged Passions:university, taxes, Taxes, expansion, domestic violence, watershed, funding, housing, and parks

Residences at North Hill Park (Mount Vernon District) 219 units Redevelopment of Certain FCRHA Public Housing Properties under HUD Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) FCRHA property renovations: Wedgewood, Murraygate, Mount Vernon Gardens, RAD properties One University (Braddock District) approximately 180 units Preservation of Parkwood Apartments (Mason District) 220 units Arden project (Mount Vernon District) - (pending funding and tax-credit award) - approximately 118 units

Tagged Passions:property, university, taxes, Taxes, rental, preservation, funding, housing, and parks

According to the Center for Housing Research at Virginia Tech, the total affordable housing gap in Fairfax County for low- and moderate-income renters (earning 80 percent of the area median income (AMI) and below) is approximately 31,360 units.

About 40,000 net new housing units affordable to households earning up to approximately 120 percent of AMI are needed based on projected housing needs through 2032. Consider tax exemption for developers providing housing affordable to extremely low-income households (30 percent of area median income and below) Develop and implement policy for use of Tyson s housing funds Identify opportunities to expand FCRHA income GMU Health study One Fairfax Policy
Tagged Passions:health, taxes, Taxes, policy, poverty, funding, and housing

FCRHA Federal Resources: Bridging Affordability: Continuum of Care (turnover):

Apply for additional Family Unification Program and Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing vouchers Explore increased flexibility in policies concerning serving persons graduating from permanent supportive housing FCRHA- Fairfax County Rental Program (Seniors): Continued implementation of FCRHA Moving to Work designation Faciliate affordable studio development countywide Health and Human Services System Integration Identify opportunities to expand FCRHA income Explore updating of Workforce Dwelling Unit policy
Tagged Passions:health, veterans, policy, services, development, rental, workforce, program, Development, seniors, and housing

15
114 85 350 FY 2019 Net Increase

No additional detail provided

14
82

Com munit

ywide Housing Strategic Plan

Draft Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan April 2018 A Fairfax County, Va publication

Tagged Passions:strategic and housing

Executive Summary:

Fairfax County is a great place to live and to do business. However, a lack of housing options is putting the County s well-being and future prosperity at risk. One in five renters in the County pay more than 50 percent of their income for housing, requiring them to make difficult choices among what necessities they are able to afford. In the next 15 years, over 18,000 new housing units will be needed for households earning less than 80 percent of the Area Median Income. These are just two examples that illustrate the need for more price-appropriate housing in Fairfax County.
Tagged Passions:risk, housing, and business

Without a sufficient supply of housing affordable to individuals and families all along the income spectrum Fairfax County will not be able to reach its full economic development potential and remain a first-class community. The Fairfax County community has come together in recent years to develop the Strategic Plan to Facilitate the Economic Success of Fairfax County to support a strong economic development strategy, and the One Fairfax Policy to support inclusivity and shared prosperity. This Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan (the Plan) marks a continuation of Fairfax County s emphasis on building and maintaining a vibrant, resilient community.

The Board of Supervisors requested the Plan and it was developed by the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and the Affordable Housing Advisory Committee (AHAC) to address the significant need for price-appropriate housing options for current and projected residents of Fairfax County. Phase 1 of the Plan identifies 25 short-term strategies that can be implemented without major policy changes or significant sources of new revenue to start the process of creating more housing options for future and current County residents and workers. Phase 2 of the plan, to be developed subsequent to Board approval of Phase 1, will include longer-term strategies for developing new tools, policies, and resources to support the production, preservation and access to housing that is affordable to all who live and work in our community. This document accomplishes Phase 1 of this communitywide effort 25 strategies that represent near-term, measurable action items that will have a significant impact. They are organized under four broad categories:
Tagged Passions:policy, development, strategic, preservation, Development, housing, economic development, and community development

Modernizing FCRHA / HCD Administration and Processes: making existing processes more efficient, using existing resources more innovatively, and leveraging partnerships to support the development and preservation of the continuum of affordable housing

Tagged Passions:development, preservation, Development, and housing

Land Use and Zoning Tools: identifying ways to use land more creatively to build partnerships and expand housing options

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing and zoning

Funding Sources and Uses: deploying existing resources more efficiently and focusing existing efforts on those most in need

Housing for Vulnerable Populations: ensuring the continuum of housing options through making affordable and accessible housing options available for persons with disabilities, seniors, and extremely low-income individuals and families, including those transitioning from homelessness These strategies are immediate steps that can be taken to address the need for more price-appropriate housing in one to two years. It is clear, however, that Phase 2 of the Plan a long-range implementation and resource plan will be necessary to address the 62,184 new housing units that will be needed in Fairfax County in the next 15 years. The market, alone, will not produce the necessary housing options for Fairfax County s future. The Fairfax County Department of Housing and Community Development and the Fairfax County Affordable Housing Advisory Committee are proud to share Phase 1 of the Fairfax County Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan.

Tagged Passions:poverty, development, strategic, market, Development, funding, seniors, housing, and community development

1
Why a Strategic Plan for Housing? Fairfax County is an extraordinary community with an exceptionally strong local economy and high quality of life. The median income for a household of four is 110,300, making it one of the highest-income areas in the country. However, in a county of approximately 1.2 million people, thousands and thousands of households are living paycheck-to-paycheck due in large part to severe lack of price-appropriate housing. Price-appropriate housing means housing that costs 30 percent of the household s annual gross income or less. In other words, all households in Fairfax County, regardless of income, should have a variety of housing options they can afford.

Fairfax County s reputation as an exceptional place to live, and its position as a place where businesses want to locate and stay, is threatened by the lack of price-appropriate housing for all of its residents and workers. When everyone has access to housing that is affordable for them:
Tagged Passions:strategic, housing, business, and economy

Simply put, Fairfax County is at a crossroads. Wage growth is not keeping pace with the cost of and demand for housing and families, particularly those that would be considered low- or moderate-income, are falling further and further behind. The economic viability of Fairfax County is at stake, as evidenced by Fairfax County s 2015 Strategic Plan to Facilitate the Economic Success of Fairfax County. Furthermore, the lack of a range of price-appropriate housing in the county hinders the full implementation of the county s One Fairfax policy, which calls for equitable access to communities of high-opportunity.

1See, for example, Brennan, Maya, Lisa Sturtevant and Patrick Reed. 2014. The Impacts of Affordable Housing on Education. Washington DC: National Housing Conference; and Viveiros, Janet, Mindy Ault and Nabihah Maqbool. 2015. The Impacts of Affordable Housing on Health: A Research Summary. Washington DC: National Housing Conference. Persons with disabilities have access to housing that is appropriate for their needs and the elderly are more able to age in place
Tagged Passions:health, education, policy, strategic, growth, and housing

People have better prospects for upward economic mobility and self-sufficiency

Employers can hire workers who are able to live close to where they work, and there is less congestion on our roads Positive outcomes are more likely for families and children, including better educational outcomes for children and better health outcomes for people of all ages1
Tagged Passions:health, streets, and traffic

2
Why Housing Matters in Fairfax County

Tagged Passions:housing

Housing supports sustainable local economic growth

______
Tagged Passions:growth and housing

Housing opportunities to encourage people to

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing

both live and work in the community

Short commutes, easier to attract and retain workers Communities that are world-class places to

live, work and play

No additional detail provided

Housing is the basis for inclusive and diverse

communities ______ Equitable access to opportunities and services, regardless of race and socioeconomic status Communities in which everyone can prosper Housing serves as a platform for individual and family well-being ______
Tagged Passions:services and housing

Economic self-sufficiency and upward mobility

No additional detail provided

Student achievement and academic success

Physical and mental health and well-being How Housing Supports the County s Plan for Economic Success Housing affordability is critically important for ensuring that businesses want to locate to Fairfax County and then stay here. The Economic Success plan lays out six broad goals to maintain, diversify, and enhance the strong and vital Fairfax County community in order to sustain and grow our economic prosperity:

Tagged Passions:health, mental health, housing, and business

1.
Further Diversify our Economy 2. Create Places Where People Want to Be 3. Improve Speed, Consistency and Predictability of the Development Review Process 4. Invest in Natural and Physical Infrastructure 5. Achieve Economic Success through Education and Equity 6. Increase Agility of County Government

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:education, development, Development, and economy

Housing is an important element in every single goal. When advocating as a community for more price- appropriate housing, we fail to effectively communicate why it is important. We fail to discuss its value; how it is the foundational element of economic resilience and competitiveness in local communities. How it improves the local tax base and stabilizes family units. How communities benefit from public investments; ensuring that opportunities for individuals and families of all income levels are available.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:investment, taxes, Taxes, competitiveness, and housing

3
The Urban Land Institute reports that more than half of the large companies with more than 100 employees cite a lack of price-appropriate housing near their business as a significant challenge; and 58 percent of the companies claim to have lost employees due to burdensome commutes. By having housing that is affordable, employees are able to live where they work and support the local economy. In addition, having a larger pool of waged workers makes for a more attractive location for businesses to relocate, which in turn, improves the commercial tax base so that local government is less reliant on residential real estate property taxes. It s all connected.

Tagged Passions:property, taxes, commercial, Taxes, property tax, housing, business, and economy

It is time we start the conversation about the economic benefits of having price-appropriate housing in our communities. It is time to start showing that it is more than housing assistance; that it is a valuable economic resource that benefits us all. Price-appropriate housing is good for the local economy, improves the local tax base, stabilizes family units, allows workers to live where they work, and provides opportunities for individuals and families of all income levels. It is not just an issue for the lower-income and underserved populations - it benefits us all.

How Housing Promotes Equity In addition to the connection between housing and the county s economic success, price-appropriate housing is directly connected to the success of households at the individual level. National research bears out the correlations having homes that are affordable correlates to better mental health, less stress for our children, more economic mobility; just to name a few examples. One connection that is particularly important in Fairfax County is the one between housing and the ability to ensure equitable access to communities of opportunity. The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors and the Fairfax County School Board adopted the One Fairfax racial and social equity policy in 2017, to ensure all individuals in our community have an opportunity to reach their highest level of personal achievement. Stable, affordable and high-quality housing is the key to increasing access to opportunities and ensuring all residents can prosper.
Tagged Passions:health, taxes, education, Taxes, policy, mental health, discrimination, racial, housing, and economy

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As a community, we can agree that where a person lives and the associated opportunities and services present in that neighborhood should not be a leading determinant in the health of their family. In fact, a person s ZIP code is a stronger predictor of his or her overall health than other factors, including race and genetics. And it s not just life expectancy access to care, access to health information, and quality of life are all affected by where one lives. Fairfax County policymakers, as well as affordable housing developers, have an opportunity to create a comprehensive and thoughtful approach to the planning for new housing that can play a role in driving socioeconomic integration, reversing racial disparity trends, eliminating institutional or structural racism, and ensuring that outcomes and opportunities for all people in our community are no longer predicted by where a person lives.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:health, services, discrimination, civil rights, racial, disparity, housing, neighborhood, and planning

Objectives of the Strategic Plan

The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors requested the development of the strategic plan for housing in 2016, and the Affordable Housing Advisory Committee (AHAC) took primary responsibility for overseeing the development of the plan. AHAC led a communitywide effort that benefited from input from residents and employers through numerous public meetings, one- on-one conversations, and an online survey. More than five thousand members of our community contributed their voices to the plan over the past year. As a result, the plan reflects the shared desire to maintain and grow our extraordinary community.
Tagged Passions:development, strategic, Development, and housing

There were several objectives for this strategic planning process:

To create a shared community vision of how housing supports local economic growth and community sustainability
Tagged Passions:sustainability, strategic, growth, housing, and planning

To quantify the housing needed to accommodate future growth and support the County s economic sustainability

To develop specific, measurable, and actionable strategies for meeting Communitywide housing goals
Tagged Passions:sustainability, growth, and housing

To identify the program and policies, and specific funding sources, that will be required to address housing needs in 5, 10, and 15 years even as we experience current housing shortages

It is anticipated that this document will be the first step in a two-part process, identifying the need in our community, setting targets for housing production, and suggesting initial implementation steps that can be addressed in the next one to two years. The second, and more challenging step, will be identifying long-term implementation strategies, and the additional resources needed to carry out those strategies. 5

Tagged Passions:grocery, program, funding, and housing

In fact, a person s ZIP code is a stronger predictor of his or her overall health than other factors, including race and genetics. And it s not just life expectancy access to care, access to health information, and quality of life are all affected by where one lives.2

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:health

2
Graham, Garth, Ostrowski, MaryLynn and Alyse Sabina. Defeating The ZIP Code Health Paradigm: Data, Technology, And Collaboration are Key.

Housing Needs More price-appropriate housing is needed in Fairfax County at a range of income levels, in both the rental and homeownership markets. The national post-recession recovery has been slow and has had a particularly strong impact on Fairfax County due to housing costs that have continued to rise even as incomes have stayed flat or risen moderately; and due to the region s dependence on federal government contracting. In fact, it has become increasingly difficult for many households to find housing they can afford in Fairfax County. Between 2010 and 2015, the average rent in Fairfax County has increased 17 percent and typical home prices for single- family homes, town homes and condominiums were up 15, 23 and 27 percent respectively. Over the same period, the average household income in the County increased by only 10 percent and for many low-wage workers incomes did not increase at all. As housing costs, particularly rents, increase more than incomes, households find themselves more likely to be cost-burdened. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines cost- burdened as any household that spends more than 30 percent of household income for mortgage costs or gross rent. Households spending more than 50 percent are considered to be severely cost-burdened. In Fairfax County, according to the most recent American Community Survey, 44.3 percent of renters (more than 55,000 households) and 22.9 percent of homeowners (more than 60,000 households) in Fairfax County spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing. This means that there are more people in the County who are cost-burdened (115,000) than over 90 percent of the total populations of counties in the Commonwealth of Virginia. There are more individuals in the County who are cost-burdened due to housing (115,000) than over 90 percent of the total populations of counties in the Commonwealth of Virginia.
Tagged Passions:health, contract, Technology, development, rental, technology, market, Development, housing, and community development

Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Surveys, 2010 and 2015; MRIS

Tagged Passions:community development

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Current Housing Needs for Vulnerable Households

While the cost-burden situation is problematic for any household that pays more than 30 percent of their income in housing costs, it can become a crisis for those households with extremely low-incomes or those with fixed incomes. For example, the lack of price-appropriate housing in the county has a direct connection to the cause of much of the homelessness in Fairfax County. The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors recognized this when they endorsed the Blueprint for Success: Strategic Directions for the Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness in the Fairfax-Falls Church Community in 2007. Much progress has been made since then in reducing the overall number of homeless households in our community and yet our most vulnerable residents continue to be at risk of housing instability and homelessness. On the night of the January 2017 Point in Time count, nearly 1,000 people in Fairfax County were homeless3. Low incomes and expensive housing are the main reasons for homelessness.
Tagged Passions:church, recognition, poverty, risk, strategic, housing, and homeless

In addition to those households that are experiencing homelessness, more than 70,000 Fairfax County residents have a disability. Data shows that individuals with disabilities are much more likely to have extremely low-incomes and often face a compounded problem - finding housing that is price-appropriate AND has the accessibility features they need to live comfortably in their homes. Similarly, our elderly neighbors, many of whom have worked in Fairfax County throughout their careers and have contributed to their communities and the local economy, are having difficulty affording their homes on fixed incomes. Compared to all households in Fairfax County, a larger proportion of households with at least one person who is 75 or older have very low-incomes. Elderly households present the second greatest need for more affordable housing, behind small family households and singles. As housing costs increase, more senior households will likely become cost burdened or more cost burdened, since many elderly households have relatively fixed incomes.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:disability, poverty, housing, and economy

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3 Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. 2017. Homelessness in Metropolitan Washington: Results and Analysis from the Annual Point-in-Time (PIT) Count of Homeless Persons

Current Housing Needs for Low- and Moderate-Wage Workers Individuals and families with the lowest incomes face the greatest challenges finding housing they can afford. These households include many workers who are essential to the Fairfax County community. For example, a typical retail salesperson in the County earns less than 30,000 per year. Restaurant workers, housekeepers, childcare providers, home-health aides, bus drivers and security guards in Fairfax County also have an average income of around 30,0004. Working households earning 30,000 per year can only afford to pay 750 per month for housing, but the average rent in Fairfax County is more than 1,7005. The majority of overcrowded households include at least one child and have incomes below 50 percent of AMI. These workers are a critical component of our local economy and they deserve to have an opportunity to live and work in Fairfax County. What happens when working families earning low wages cannot find housing they can afford? In many cases, they live in overcrowded housing or commute to Fairfax County from other jurisdictions. Overcrowded housing continues to be a critical challenge in Fairfax County, with a total of 4,640 households overcrowded (1.01-1.5 people per room), and nearly 1,900 households severely overcrowded (more than 1.51 people per room). The majority of overcrowded households include at least one child and have incomes below 50 percent of Area Median Income (AMI). Given the prevalence of children in overcrowded households, families in our community may be outgrowing their housing units, but at the same time are unable to afford a larger home they can afford. Many public sector workers who serve the Fairfax County community cannot afford to live here.

Tagged Passions:health, council, restaurants, Child Care, Public Transit, housing, security, economy, and homeless

Teacher Starting Salary - 47,046 Would need to work 11 years before earning enough to rent the average one bedroom unit.

No additional detail provided

Police Officer Starting Salary - 50,265 Would need to work 5 years before earning enough to rent the average one bedroom unit.

Public Health Nurse Starting Salary - 51,254 Would need to work 6 years before earning enough to rent the average one bedroom unit The average monthly rent in Fairfax County was 1,764 in 2015. You need an income of at least 70,560 to afford the typical rent.

Tagged Passions:health and public safety

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National Housing Conference, Paycheck to Paycheck 2016 5 2015 American Community Survey

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing and community development

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, 2015 American Community Survey; Economic, Demographic and Statistical Research; Fairfax County Department of Neighborhood and Community Services

Tagged Passions:services, neighborhood, and community development

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The Challenge of Homeownership

In addition to the difficulty in finding price-appropriate housing options in the rental market, increasingly, high housing costs in Fairfax County burden households with middle and higher incomes and put homeownership opportunities out of reach. Households with higher incomes occupy many of the homes that would be affordable to low-income households. For example, 67 percent of the owned or for-sale housing stock that would be affordable to very low-, low- and moderate-income households is occupied by households with income greater than is required to comfortably afford those units, indicating that homebuyers with lower incomes face intense competition for affordable homes from households with higher incomes. Many workers, including Millennials and young families, find they are not able to afford to buy a home in our community. The ability of young households to purchase a home in Fairfax County has dropped precipitously over a ten-year period. In 2005, more than half of 25- to 34-year olds in Fairfax County (52.9 percent) were homeowners. In 2015, only 38 percent of young adults in their late 20s and early 30s living in Fairfax County own a home. Recent research has shown that the desire for homeownership among young adults is as strong now as it has ever been, but this cohort faces new obstacles including rising debt and fewer affordable homeownership options which are leading to delays in home buying6. Future Housing Needs Our community already faces a deficit of more than 31,000 rental homes affordable to low-income individuals and families. Over time, the gap between the need and the supply will grow considerably without new approaches for expanded housing availability and affordability. Over the next 15 years, the County is expected to add more than 62,000 households, primarily working households7. These are household projections based on the County s analysis of recent growth and the capacity for residential development based on current land use and zoning. To support sustainable population growth and bolster our economy, it is important to think about how we plan for price-appropriate housing to address the current housing gap and to meet the needs of the growing workforce. 2015 2005
Tagged Passions:purchasing, poverty, development, rental, workforce, market, growth, Development, housing, sale, economy, and zoning

38
of young adults in their late 20s and early 30s living in Fairfax County own a home.

52.9 of 25- to 34-year olds in Fairfax County were homeowners.

6
See, for example, Thompson, Derek. 2016. Millennials: The Mobile and the Stuck. The Atlantic August 24. 7 For background on the County s forecasts, see Demographics Reports 2016 County of Fairfax, Virginia, available online https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/demogrph/demrpts/report/fullrpt.pdf.

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As our community grows it will need to grow in order to ensure economic vitality and prosperity the County will add workers and families all along the income spectrum. Based on projections from the County and the George Mason University (GMU), over the next 15 years, the County is expected to add:

4,591 extremely low-income households (income <30 AMI) 8,443 very low-income households (30-50 AMI) 5,588 low-income households (50-80 AMI) 9,048 moderate-income households (80-100 AMI) 11,929 households with incomes between 100 and 120 of AMI 22,585 households with incomes above 120 of AMI8 While housing production has been on the rise since the Great Recession, Fairfax County is not producing enough housing to close the existing housing gap and will not be able to meet future housing needs. The County would need to add 4,146 new units each year for 15 years to meet the 2032 target above, but the County issued building permits for only 3,720 units in 2004 at the height of building in the 1992- 2016 period, before heading into the housing bubble. Without incentives or other changes that reduce the cost of building or removal of disincentives for building, the opportunity for the County to deliver more than 3,720 units in a single year seems unlikely.
Tagged Passions:university, poverty, grocery, housing, and incentive

These forecasts also suggest that over the next 15 years, there will be demand for 18,622 homes affordable to households with incomes below 80 percent of AMI (29.9 of total new homes needed). Given housing market conditions in the Washington DC region and in Fairfax County, it is challenging to build new housing with rents or prices that are affordable to households at this income range without some form of subsidy. There are several reasons why lower-cost housing isn t produced in our community:

High costs of land and construction make it difficult to provide sufficient housing at more moderate prices and rents;

Tagged Passions:market, construction, and housing

Federal, state and local regulations add to the cost of building housing, and these added costs are passed along to residents in the form of higher rents and prices; and

Opposition to new construction or increased density from existing Fairfax County residents results in too little housing being built, limiting supply and putting upward pressure on prices and rents. The private market meets the demand for housing for higher-income households; however, housing for low-income households is difficult and expensive to provide. In order to develop new housing or often to preserve existing housing at rents or prices that are affordable to our community s low- and moderate-income residents and workers, it is necessary for there to be some type of subsidy, either a financial subsidy provided in the form of a low-interest loan, grant or tax credit, a subsidy in the form of reduced land costs, an incentive in the form of an increase in the allowable density, a reduction in development approval requirements or all of the above.

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, poverty, development, finance, market, construction, Development, housing, grant, regulation, and incentive

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8 See Appendix for details on methodology.

No additional detail provided

8
See Appendix for details on methodology.

Strategies to Expand Housing Options in Fairfax County

Tagged Passions:housing

In order to ensure that our community remains vibrant and diverse, and that our economy is strong and resilient, we must take action to ensure that there is enough housing of the right types and at rents and prices that are affordable to support growth in the County s workforce and broader community, and that current and anticipated housing needs are met.

Fairfax County s Housing Blueprint was a first step in achieving this vision, as it has focused affordable housing policies and resources on serving those with the greatest need, including homeless families and individuals, persons with special needs, and households with extremely low-incomes. The overarching principle of the Blueprint is that home affordability refers to a continuum of income and ability. The research and outreach conducted as a part of this strategic plan has re-affirmed this principle and the four main goals of the Blueprint: 1. To end homelessness in ten years; 2. To provide affordable housing options to special needs populations; 3. To meet the affordable housing needs of low-income working families; and 4. To increase workforce housing through creative partnerships and public policy

Tagged Passions:policy, poverty, strategic, workforce, growth, housing, economy, and homeless

To meet the full range of housing needs in our community, and particularly the housing needs of individuals and families who earn below 80 percent of AMI, it will be necessary for the County, the Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority (FCRHA), non-profits, the faith community, and local businesses and employers to come together to find ways to help fill the gap between what it costs to build housing in our community and the prices and rents that our workers, seniors, vulnerable populations and others can afford.

In Fairfax County there already exists a range of policies, programs and partnerships designed to address the community s needs as identified in the County s Housing Blueprint9, examples of which include: TO END HOMELESSNESS IN TEN YEARS
Tagged Passions:program, seniors, housing, and business

TO PROVIDE AFFORDABLE HOUSING OPTIONS TO SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS

Tagged Passions:housing

TO MEET THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING NEEDS OF LOW-INCOME WORKING FAMILIES

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:poverty and housing

TO INCREASE WORKFORCE HOUSING THROUGH CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS AND PUBLIC POLICY

Administering the Bridging Affordability programAdministering the Bridging Affordability Program Providing a homeless preference in the FCRHA s federal rental programs Facilitating home repairs for older individuals to help them stay in their residences Providing affordable adult housing and assisted living facilities Providing state-funded rental assistance to persons with developmental disabilities Owning and managing 818 senior and specialized housing units Assisting individuals in crisis, to ensure they can maintain their housing assistance Owning and managing over 3,000 affordable multifamily rental units Fostering the creation of affordable and workforce units by non-profit and for-profit developers Administering the First-Time Homebuyers Program to assist low- and moderate-income prospective buyers with information on homeownership and opportunities to meet with lenders
Tagged Passions:policy, rental, workforce, program, housing, and homeless

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9 The Housing Blueprint was created in the wake of the 2007 recession to focus affordable housing policies and resources on serving those with the greatest need, including homeless families and individuals, persons with special needs, and households with extremely low-incomes.

Phase 1 of the Communitywide Housing Strategic Plan contains 25 specific strategies Fairfax County can take within one to two years and with no new additional public resources to begin to produce and preserve more affordable and workforce housing. However, it is clear that in the mid- and longer- term, new and substantial resources will be required to ensure that all County residents and workers who want to live in the County including those with the lowest incomes and the most vulnerable economic situations can have access to safe, stable and affordable housing. These Phase 1 strategies are intended to be adopted as a full package of actionable steps; will require inter-departmental coordination and participation from the business and non-profit communities; and will set the groundwork for longer-term, more comprehensive strategies that will be detailed in the forthcoming Phase 2 of the Plan.

Tagged Passions:poverty, strategic, workforce, housing, business, and homeless

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A. Modernizing FCRHA/HCD Administration and Processes

Within the Fairfax County Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and the Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority (FCRHA), there are opportunities to make existing processes more efficient and to use existing resources more innovatively to leverage partnerships, bringing non-local money to the County to support the development and preservation of housing. These recommendations involve modifications to existing procedures within HCD and the FCRHA, as well as a move towards re- positioning FCRHA assets to use them more efficiently.

Tagged Passions:development, preservation, Development, housing, procedure, and community development

A1. Streamline the Housing Blueprint Application Process to Better Align with the LIHTC Application Process. The Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the primary way that new affordable housing developments are financed and is a source of substantial non-local funding for new and preserved housing in Fairfax County. With small changes to its Housing Blueprint application process and with increased communication with the developer community, the County/FCRHA-supported projects can be better able to compete for LIHTC dollars to support the development of housing for low- and moderate- income working families in the County.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, development, finance, program, Development, funding, and housing

A2. Maximize the Potential of FCRHA-Owned Properties. The FCRHA has significant resources in terms of the land and properties it owns. While not all FCRHA assets can or should be re-positioned, the FCRHA should continue to evaluate which sites have the greatest potential for development/redevelopment at higher densities and with non-profit and for- profit developer partners. Potential redevelopment and expansion of FCRHA-owned properties offers opportunities for innovative public-private partnerships.

Tagged Passions:development, expansion, sites, and Development

A3. Plan for Reinvestment of Savings from the Refinancing and/or Maturing of Debt Service of Wedgewood and Crescent Properties. As refinancing opportunities become available and/or the debt service on these properties is paid down, a strategy should be developed to determine how to reallocate eventual savings for other affordable housing priorities. Currently, nearly half of the amount in the County s Affordable Housing Fund ( Penny Fund ) are allocated for debt service on Wedgewood and Crescent.

Tagged Passions:strategic and housing

A4. Develop a Plan to Expand Use of FCRHA Bonds. The FCRHA has the authority to issue bonds to support the development and preservation of affordable housing. The FCRHA should create a more aggressive outreach program to better publicize FCRHA bond financing to support the goals of the community.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:development, preservation, bond, program, Development, and housing

A5. Examine the FCRHA s Deep Subsidy Programs to Better Align Resources to Serve Those Most in Need. As federal resources remain constrained, it is important that the County is directing those resources to meet its overarching principles of ensuring a continuum of housing and to serve residents with the greatest needs. The FCRHA should review existing Federal housing preferences and evaluate how well existing programs meet residents needs.

Tagged Passions:program and housing

A6. Incorporate the One Fairfax Policy into the FCRHA s Policymaking Process. One Fairfax commits the County and Schools to intentionally consider equity when making policies or delivering programs and services. As part of the FCRHA s regular consideration of policy and funding decisions, develop an equity lens that enables staff to evaluate how its recommendations meet the vision of One Fairfax.

Tagged Passions:education, policy, services, strategic, program, and funding

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B. Land Use and Zoning Tools

There are many ways in which changes to land use or zoning, or new approaches to uses on certain types of land, could significantly increase the supply and availability of housing affordable to the Fairfax County workforce. The County is currently undertaking a comprehensive update of its Zoning Ordinance and there are also planning efforts underway for particular neighborhoods in the County (e.g. the Route 1 corridor). These recommendations build off the County s current and recent land use and zoning studies, and go further to identify ways to use land more creatively to build partnerships and expand housing options.

Tagged Passions:ordinance, corridor, workforce, housing, neighborhood, planning, and zoning

B1. Update the Affordable Dwelling Unit (ADU) and Workforce Dwelling Unit (WDU) Programs. Both the ADU and WDU programs have been effective at generating new affordable housing in Fairfax County. However, there is a need for updating and revising both programs to respond to housing needs and current market conditions. As part of the Zoning Ordinance update, the County should work with a comprehensive group of stakeholders to make improvements to the ADU and WDU programs.

Tagged Passions:ordinance, workforce, market, program, housing, and zoning

B2. Create Guidelines for Adaptive Reuse of Commercial Space for Affordable Housing. Housing created through the reuse of commercial buildings, or through the use of land currently zoned for commercial uses, can create more opportunities for mixed-income housing. The County should build off of the recommendations from the Office Building Repositioning and Repurposing Task Force and move forward to develop policy direction and a pilot for creating new housing options through adaptive reuse.

B3. Develop a Preservation Strategy. Preserving existing subsidized and market affordable housing is vital to meeting the needs of low- and moderate-income individuals and families. The County should develop a comprehensive strategy that includes principles and guidelines around affordable housing preservation.

Tagged Passions:commercial, policy, strategic, preservation, market, housing, and zoning

B4. Streamline the Process for Public-Private Partnerships that Make Use of Publicly-Owned Land. Making vacant or underutilized publicly-owned land available for affordable and mixed-income housing is an important way to expand housing options without direct public financial subsidy. These public land projects necessarily involve public-private partnerships. The County should review the Public Private Education and Infrastructure Act (PPEA) framework and consider moving to a more streamlined process for public land projects that involve affordable housing.

Tagged Passions:education, finance, and housing

B5. Incorporate Guidelines for Public Land into the Capital Improvement Program(CIP) Process. Co-locating housing with new and/or redeveloped public facilities is an effective way to create affordable housing options in mixed-use settings. The County s CIP process should be amended so an assessment of the appropriateness of co-locating housing is done in all projects involving building new public facilities or redeveloping existing facilities.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:commercial, capital spending, Capital Spending, program, and housing

B6. Modify the Accessory Dwelling Unit Policy. Within the larger Zoning Ordinance update, the County should review the current requirements for creating accessory units. Working with a broad set of stakeholders, improve the accessory dwelling unit requirements to allow for the creation of more accessory units.

Tagged Passions:policy, ordinance, and zoning

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B7. Explore Zoning Districts that Allow for Missing Middle Housing. As part of the Zoning Ordinance update, identify zoning districts where flexibility in housing types would be appropriate. Missing middle refers to a range of multi-unit or clustered housing types (e.g., duplexes, triplexes, etc.) compatible in scale with single-family homes that help meet the growing demand for walkable urban living. Review other local jurisdictions policies on missing middle housing and explore options for Fairfax County.

B8. Integration with the Zoning Ordinance Modernization Project. In 2017 the Office of Community Revitalization and the Department of Planning and Zoning initiated an effort to modernize the County s Zoning Ordinance to restructure it to make it more user friendly, and to prioritize key amendments for updating the Ordinance. Changes to the Ordinance might affect the ability to develop certain types of housing in specified areas of the County, and improvements to the Ordinance could enable more innovative housing preservation and development opportunities. The County should ensure that the preservation and development of affordable housing is considered during each relevant phase of the Zoning Ordinance Modernization process.

Tagged Passions:ordinance, development, preservation, Development, housing, planning, and zoning

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C. Funding Sources and Uses

While the short-term strategies presented in this report do not include recommendations for dedicated funding for housing, it will be important in the mid- and longer-term to identify new resources to support housing development and preservation. In the short-term, there are ways the County and the FCRHA can deploy their existing resources more efficiently and to explore ways to shift certain resources to be used for those most in need. At the same time, the County should be planning for ways to identify new resources to support the development and preservation of affordable and workforce housing.

Tagged Passions:development, workforce, preservation, Development, funding, housing, and planning

C1. Preserve Existing Affordable Housing Resources. Currently, Fairfax County has several resources that are dedicated to the acquisition and preservation of affordable housing, including the Housing Trust Fund and the Penny for Affordable Housing Fund. These are critical, local funding streams that allow Fairfax County to provide capital funding to private and nonprofit affordable housing developers. Given the expected demand for price-appropriate housing as the population of Fairfax County continues to increase, these resources must be maintained at current levels and should be considered for further expansion.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:expansion, preservation, funding, and housing

C2. Create Guidelines for the Tysons Housing Fund. The Tysons Plan recommended contributions from commercial development to a housing trust fund which would be dedicated to supporting affordable and workforce housing options in Tysons. The County should formalize guidelines for the use for these funds to ensure that they are used as efficiently as possible to serve low- and moderate-income workers in the Tysons area.

C3. Assess a Commercial Contribution Policy. The link between job growth and housing availability and affordability is clear. Commercial contributions to the Affordable Housing Fund can be an efficient way for employers to support housing development that benefits the workforce. The County should assess its current policy of commercial contributions and re-visit the countywide commerical linkage policy in transit-oriented development areas to determine whether a new commercial contribution policy should be adopted. C4. Explore Using Existing Tax Incremental Financing (TIF) Policies to Promote Housing Affordability. TIF allocates future increases in property taxes from a designated area to pay for improvements within that area, which could include affordable housing. Explore the use of the county s existing authority to implement TIF and associated policies as a means to promote affordable housing development and preservation.
Tagged Passions:property, taxes, commercial, Taxes, policy, development, TIF, workforce, preservation, growth, Development, funding, property tax, and housing

C5. Dedicate Resources to Expand the Scope of Local Rental Housing Subsidy. With the decline in Federal housing resources and, in particular, with insufficient Federal commitment to the Housing Choice Voucher program, Fairfax County needs to expand the scope of its local rental housing subsidy program, known as Bridging Affordability, to assist its lowest-income families find housing they can afford. The Bridging Affordability program should be re-focused on meeting the needs of people with disabilities and other special needs (including victims of domestic violence, and those experiencing homelessness) and should allow for project basing of subsidies in affordable rental units.

C6. Provide Downpayment and Closing Cost Assistance. Use proceeds from the sale of ADUs that are currently contributing to the Affordable Housing Fund to expand assistance to moderate-income first-time homebuyers in the County. In addition, look for ways to partner with County employers to expand employer downpayment assistance programs. C7. Review Options for Restructuring the County s Housing Trust Fund. Evaluate the structure of the Housing Trust Fund in light of the processes, funding and procedures of local trust funds in neighboring and comparable communities. Develop a plan for moving forward on changes that will create an efficient and effective trust fund. 16

Tagged Passions:rental, domestic violence, program, funding, housing, sale, and procedure

D.
Housing for Vulnerable Populations

As part of its commitment to ensuring that Fairfax County has a continuum of housing options, the community will continue to work to make affordable and accessible housing options available for persons with disabilities, seniors, and extremely low-income individuals and families, including those at risk of or transitioning from homelessness.

Tagged Passions:poverty, risk, seniors, and housing

D1. Expand Access to Housing Options for Persons with Special Needs. Finding affordable, appropriate housing is a particular challenge in Fairfax County for persons with special needs, many of whom are in some types of crisis (including victims of domestic violence, and those experiencing homelessness) or have a disability that prevents them from attaining full employment. The County should make efficient use of existing resources to create housing options, including transitional housing where appropriate, and should develop a plan with partners, such as the Governing Board of the Fairfax-Falls Church Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness for connecting individuals with affordable and appropriate housing.

Tagged Passions:church, disability, domestic violence, housing, and employment

D2. Support Aging in Place. The vast majority of older adults would prefer to age in their homes. However, it can be increasingly challenging to maintain a home as mobility declines. Property taxes can also make staying in a home unaffordable. The County should support programs and services to help enable seniors to remain in their homes by providing education and outreach to residents and connecting residents with existing privately-run programs.

D3. Facilitate Opportunities for Faith Communities to Develop Affordable Housing. Houses of worship in Fairfax County including churches, temples, synagogues and mosques often have underutilized land that could be appropriate for housing, particularly housing for vulnerable populations. Working with regional partners, the County should increase education and awareness about opportunities for housing development on land owned by faith communities, and connect these communities with available technical and financial assistance.
Tagged Passions:church, property, taxes, education, Taxes, services, development, finance, program, Development, property tax, seniors, and housing

D4. Continue to Address the Efficiency of Fairfax County s Existing Homeless and Housing Supports Networks. As the Office to Prevent and End Homelessness works with its Governing Board and community to establish new goals, and as the 10 Year Plan comes to an end, a broader focus on housing for all will be established in the Health and Human Services system. This focus will include housing for homeless, mental heath and domestic violence. It is clear that additional housing resources are needed that provide solutions to some of our most vulnerable residents.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:health, services, government efficiency, domestic violence, housing, and homeless

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Department of Housing and Community Development and Office to Prevent and End Homelessness: Effective Partnership, Enhanced Collaboration

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:development, Development, housing, and community development

Health, Housing, and Human Services Committee

Tom Fleetwood, Director Fairfax County Department of Housing and Community Development Dean Klein, Director Office to Prevent and End Homelessness About the Office to Prevent and End Homelessness (OPEH) Established in 2008 to coordinate the implementation of Housing First and the Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness in Ten Years Highly successful model which has reduced homelessness in the community by 46 since 2008

Tagged Passions:health, services, development, Development, housing, and community development

OPEH is serving those with the most severe housing barriers

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:housing

Pairing housing and supportive services 2

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services and housing

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OPEH and HCD

The Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) and the Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority (FCRHA) focus on long-term housing HCD/FCRHA have been the essential partner in providing long-term housing options for persons coming out of homelessness
Tagged Passions:development, Development, housing, and community development

Excellent working partnership but there are opportunities for more collaboration in order to improve services while increasing efficiencies 33

Tagged Passions:services

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Areas of Enhanced Collaboration/Efficiencies

Bridging Affordability Housing Collaborative
Tagged Passions:housing

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Bridging Affordability

Bridging is the county s local rent subsidy program

Paid for with rental proceeds from Wedgewood
Tagged Passions:rental and program

Currently serves 126 families, with a total of 420 served since inception

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Bridging Affordability (Continued) HCD and OPEH will work together to redesign the admissions to the program to more purposefully serve
Tagged Passions:program

homeless households and others with special needs

Will include a community input process Result in a new procurement for the program HCD will continue to manage the program once procured HCD and OPEH will make programmatic decisions by consensus

Tagged Passions:purchasing, program, and homeless

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Housing Collaborative Currently OPEH coordinates the landlord outreach component of the Housing Collaborative
Tagged Passions:rental and housing

Cornerstones provides the current services under contract with the county

Tagged Passions:contract and services

Exploring realigning this function into HCD to optimize efficiencies, and will potentially include the landlord outreach as part of a new Bridging Affordability contract

Tagged Passions:contract and rental

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Questions/Comments

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Board of Supervisors Health, Housing and Human Services Committee

Tagged Passions:health, services, and housing

Home Child Care Facilities Ordinance Amendment Chapter 30 Summary of Proposed Changes

Background
Tagged Passions:ordinance and Child Care

Chapter 30, Article 3 of the Fairfax County Code governs Home Child Care Facilities and is intended to protect

Tagged Passions:Child Care

the health and safety of children who receive care in county family child care homes.

The Office for Children, Department of Family Services, issues home child care permits to individuals who care

Tagged Passions:health, services, Child Care, and family services

for up to four children in their homes. Residents who wish to care for more than four children must be state

No additional detail provided

licensed. The Office for Children supports family child care providers to offer quality child care programs that

promote the health, safety and education of children in their care. Regular monitoring visits, technical assistance and professional development opportunities are provided to assist providers to reach quality standards. Proposed Changes The Office for Children will be proposing the following amendments to Chapter 30 of the Code of the County of Fairfax to reflect new requirements and delete language no longer valid.
Tagged Passions:health, education, license, Child Care, development, program, and Development

Chapter 30, Article 1 of the Code of the County of Fairfax provides definitions for words and phrases

pertaining to minimum private school and child care facility standards. o Section 30-1-1 Add new barrier crimes that were approved by the Virginia General Assembly in 2017. This amendment will bring the county code definition of barrier crimes in line with those offenses that mandate a denial or revocation of the state child care license.
Tagged Passions:education, license, Child Care, crime, and facility

Chapter 30, Article 3 of the Code regulates home child care facilities in which a person cares for four or fewer children.

o Section 30-3-2 Propose the following changes to background check requirements: Replace the current search of the Virginia Central Criminal Records Exchange with a
Tagged Passions:Child Care

fingerprint-based national background check for applicants and all adult residents

every five years, with the requirement that existing providers and adult residents

complete the fingerprint-based national background check by September 30, 2018. In addition, the amendment will change the child protective services search requirement from every three years to every five years for applicants, adult residents, and all minors 14 years and older. Currently, the cost to complete a background check is 15.00. The current cost of the fingerprint-based national background check is 33.72, which will be an increase of 18.72. The state charges 57.00 per person to complete the fingerprint background checks for licensed family child care providers and centers.

Tagged Passions:license, services, and Child Care

Please see Additional Information for comparison of costs.

Home Child Care Facilities Ordinance Amendment Summary Page 2 of 2

Office for Children May 2018 Obtain a copy of the results of the central registry or other child abuse and neglect registry maintained by another state in which the applicant and/or adult resident has
Tagged Passions:ordinance, Child Care, and child abuse

resided in the preceding five years for any founded complaint of child abuse and

neglect. This amendment would reflect the state requirement which is in compliance with background check requirements in the Child Care and Development Block Grant. o Section 30-3-4 Delete language in reference to time deadlines for annual training hour requirements that are no longer valid. Additional Information
Tagged Passions:compliance, Child Care, development, child abuse, training, Development, and grant

10
Year Cost Comparison of Background Checks for a Provider (individual cost)

Year Current Cost for Background Checks for Fairfax County Permitted Family Care Providers (every 3 years) Proposed Cost for Fingerprint- based National Background

Check for Fairfax County Permitted Family Child Care

Tagged Passions:Child Care

Providers (every 5 years)

Cost for Fingerprint-based National Background Checks

for State Licensed Family Child Care Providers (every 5

years)* 2018 15.00 33.72 57.00 2019 2020 2021 15.00 2022 2023 33.72 57.00 2024 15.00 2025 2026 2027 15.00 2028 33.72 57.00 TOTAL 60.00 101.16 171.00 *(Please note that the state is waiving this fee for providers until September 30, 2018. After that date, the cost will

Tagged Passions:license and Child Care

be 57.00 per person.)

No additional detail provided

Board of Supervisors Health, Housing and Human Services Committee

May 8, 2018 Fairfax County Head Start Updates Head Start/Early Head Start Grant Submissions
Tagged Passions:health, services, poverty, family services, preschool, housing, and grant

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The Head Start/Early Head Start grant and the Early Head Start Child Care Partnership grant renewals were both submitted prior to the April 1, 2018 deadline. This renewal year is the third year for the Head Start/Early Head Start grant and is the fifth and final year of the Early Head Start Child Care Partnership grant.

McKinney Emerging Leader Scholarship
Tagged Passions:poverty, Child Care, family services, preschool, and grant

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FCPS Early Head Start teacher Stephanie Kayal and Higher Horizons parent Jamanda Crossland were awarded Virginia Head Start Association McKinney Emerging Leader Scholarships. The scholarships encourage leadership growth and development opportunities for Head Start staff and families.

Tagged Passions:poverty, development, family services, preschool, growth, and Development

Early Head Start Family Child Care Enrollment

o Staff has developed a plan to address Early Head Start Family Child Care program under-enrollment. The plan has been submitted to the federal Head Start Regional Office. Self-Assessment o Staff has completed the 2018 program self-assessment. The self- assessment process engages families and community stakeholders and supports the continuous improvement of service delivery. Enrollment o All Head Start programs are fully enrolled; the Early Head Start family child care program is currently enrolling. There is a waiting list of 481 Head Start/Early Head Start children (347 HS/134 EHS).
Tagged Passions:poverty, Child Care, family services, preschool, program, and enrollment

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