TX - Plano: City Council

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City Council

CITY COUNCIL WORK SESSION

on the Fiscal Year 2019-20 Recommended Budget Proposed CIP
Tagged Passions:council, budget, capital spending, and Capital Spending

Senator Florence Shapiro Council Chambers, Plano Municipal Center

1520 K Ave, Plano, TX Saturday, August 17, 2019 8:00 a.m. AGENDA Presenter Page

A.
Call to Order Mayor

No additional detail provided

B.
Request for Public Input on Budget CIP Council

C. Budget Work Session Overview Israelson D. Council Items and Issues for Discussion Council (Council may wish to add additional agenda items.)

Tagged Passions:council, budget, capital spending, and Capital Spending

1.
Discussion and direction regarding Community Service Drotman/Henna 3

Grants Turning Point 2. Great Update Rebate for Small Businesses Israelson

Tagged Passions:grant, business, and small business

3.
Use of Sales Tax for Consultants Israelson

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, Taxes, and services

E.
Operating Budget

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:budget

1.
Revenues

No additional detail provided

a.
Ad Valorem Tax Base Rhodes-Whitley 7

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and ad valorem

b.
Tax Rate Rhodes-Whitley 12

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

a.
Effective Tax Rate

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

b.
Rollback Tax Rate

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

c.
Tax Rate Dashboard Update 17

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

c.
Sales Tax Rhodes-Whitley 26

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, and Taxes

d.
Water Sewer Rates Rhodes-Whitley 37

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sewer, utility, Utility, water, and rates

a.
Proposed Water Rate Increase

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, and water

e.
Golf Fee Increase Reeves 45

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:golf

2.
Program Changes

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:program

a.
Salary Benefits Overview Akafia 47

No additional detail provided

b.
Additional Festival Discussion Hawkins 53

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:festival

c.
Three-year Financial Forecast General Fund Rhodes-Whitley 57

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:finance

F.
Community Investment Program Israelson/ 58

Rhodes-Whitley

Tagged Passions:program and investment

G.
Proposed Ad Valorem Tax Rate Israelson/

Rhodes-Whitley

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and ad valorem

Work Session Agenda

Page 2 of 2

H.
Adjourn

Municipal Center is wheelchair accessible. A sloped curb entry is available at the main entrance facing Municipal/L Avenue, with specially marked parking spaces nearby. Access and special parking are also

Tagged Passions:parking

available on the north side of the building. The Senator Florence Shapiro Council Chambers is

accessible by elevator to the lower level. Requests for sign interpreters or special services must be received forty-eight (48) hours prior to the meeting time by calling the City Secretary at 972-941-7120. Memorandum
Tagged Passions:services

Date: July 25, 2019

To: Mark Israelson, City Manager

Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

From: Shanette Eaden, Housing and Community Services Manager

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:services, manager, and housing

Subject: FY 2019-2020 Buffington Community Services Grant Recommendations

Summary The Community Services Division has a total of 569,400 in city general funds to be allocated for FY 2019-20. The Community Relations Commission has recommended the below programs to receive Buffington Community Services Grant (BCSG) funding: Agency/Program Recommended Amount Assistance Center of Collin County 12,836 Assistance League of Greater Collin County 21,703 City House, Inc. - RHY 18,603 City House, Inc. - TLP 22,323 Communities in Schools of the Dallas Region 18,603 Court Appointed Special Advocates of Collin County, Inc. 73,165

Tagged Passions:funding, grant, legal, boards and commissions, appointments, services, program, education, and court

Emily's Place 33,101 Hope's Door, Inc. 25,804 Jewish Family Service 86,813 Maurice Barnett Geriatric Wellness Center - Gatekeeper

14,947 Maurice Barnett Geriatric Wellness Center - Preventive Health Care 26,540 Meals on Wheels of Collin County 43,407 My Possibilities 43,590 Rape Crisis Center of Collin County dba The Turning Point 57,542 Sci-Tech Discovery Center 8,413 The Samaritan Inn, LLC. 62,010 Background

Tagged Passions:health, hotel, and seniors

In 1998, the City Council established a Community Services Grant to address the community s social service needs. The grant utilized general fund monies to support programs that provide short-term, urgent economic assistance or care services, as well as offer immediate relief of a crisis impacting the physical and/or mental health of Plano residents. In 2006, the Community Services Grant was renamed to the Buffington Community Services Grant (BCSG) in honor of the former Community Services Manager, Robert W. Buffington s, 30 years of service to Plano, primarily in the field of Community Development.

The City of Plano uses a consolidated grant process to allocate Buffington Community Service Grant (BCSG) funds. As mentioned previously, HUD funds come from the federal government. BCSG funds are appropriated by City Council at 2 per capita. BCSG funds provides public service activities directly to Plano residents, with special consideration given to those agencies offering: Short-term, urgent economic assistance, or care services; or Immediate relief of crisis impacting the physical and/or mental health of Plano residents.
Tagged Passions:funding, grant, health, council, development, services, program, Development, manager, mental health, and community development

During April and May 2019, the CRC held six (6) public meetings, including one (1) public hearing, to consider agency requests for 2019 CDBG and HOME funding provided to the City of Plano by HUD. On May 16, 2019, the Commission held a meeting to determine agency funding recommendations. Thirty (30) requests, in the amount of 2,895,752, were considered during the Consolidated Grant process. Five (5) requests were recommended by the Commission for CDBG and HOME funds; sixteen (16) requests were recommended for Buffington Community Service Grant (BCSG) funds. The Commission approved these recommendations in a vote of 6-0-1, with an abstention vote from Commissioner Virani, who was appointed after scoring for the 2019 Consolidated Grant Process was underway.

Next Steps If the recommendations are accepted, the City Manager will include the recommended agency amounts in the FY 2019-20 Budget. xc: Jack Carr, Deputy City Manager Lori Schwarz, Director of Neighborhood Services Raini Layne, Sr. Budget Analyst Page 1 of 2 FY 2019 Buffington Community Services Grant Funding Recommendations

Tagged Passions:funding, grant, boards and commissions, budget, appointments, services, hearing, administrator, manager, cdbg, and neighborhood

Prepared for the City Council Budget Work Session August 1, 2019

Agency and/or Program Name 2019 CRC Recommended Funding 2018 Agency Funding Assistance Center of Collin County 12,836 25,000 The Assistance Center of Collin County provides information and referral assistance to Plano families and individuals needing food, shelter, employment and low cost services. Assistance League of Greater Collin County 21,703 20,952 The Assistance League of Greater Collin County manages the Operation School Bell program, which provides high-quality, new clothing, and hygiene kits to Plano ISD elementary school children in need that are referred by school officials. City House, Inc. - RHY 18,603 21,929 City House provides residential and non-residential care to children through the Runaway Homeless Youth (RHY) Program. Residential care includes no-cost emergency shelter for youth ages 10-17. City House, Inc. - TLP 22,323 15,000 City House s Transitional Living Program (TLP) provides emergency and transitional residential shelter (ages 18-21) and non-residential services (ages 16-21) to homeless youth. Communities in School of the Dallas Region 18,603 5,000 Communities in School of the Dallas Region provides case management and support to at-risk students at Plano East Senior High School who struggle in school due to poverty various other factors that are beyond their control. Court Appointed Special Advocates of Collin County, Inc. 73,165 77,662 Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of Collin County serves abused and neglected children removed by emergency court order by serving as the guardian ad litem for children. Emily's Place 33,101 10,000 Emily s Place offers a two-year commitment to provide housing, counseling, addiction recovery, vocational assistance and life skills development to women and children who are victims of domestic violence. Hope's Door, Inc. 25,804 23,429 Hope s Door offers shelter for battered and abused women and their children in Plano. Jewish Family Service 86,813 79,531 Jewish Family Service provides supportive services to frail older adults and assists them in maintaining their independence in their homes through their Older Adults program. Page 2 of 2 Agency and/or Program Name 2019 CRC Recommended Funding 2018 Agency Funding Maurice Barnett Geriatric Wellness Center - Gatekeeper 14,947 21,656 The Gatekeeper Program offers in-home social work case management services to elderly and/or severely disabled Plano residents identified as at risk for abuse, self-neglect, financial exploitation and housing insecurity, which could lead to homelessness. Maurice Barnett Geriatric Wellness Center - Preventive Health Care 26,540 30,000
Tagged Passions:funding, health, finance, council, legal, budget, appointments, disability, vocational education, development, seniors, risk, services, program, emergency, employment, Development, education, poverty, youth, domestic violence, students, homeless, court, and housing

The Preventive Health Care Program provides seniors and severely disabled Plano residents with essential health care to which they may not have access due to financial restraints. Meals on Wheels of Collin County 43,407 35,005 Meals on Wheels of Collin County Senior Food Program provides home delivered meals to home bound nutritionally at-risk seniors who are unable to prepare their own meals. My Possibilities 43,590 33,774 My Possibilities provides speech therapy, music therapy, counseling, and behavior therapy to adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD), learning differences, traumatic brain injury, and other cognitive disorders. Rape Crisis Center of Collin County dba The Turning Point

57,542 47,348 The Turning Point provides counseling, education and support to those impacted by sexual assault, harassment, or abuse. Sci Tech Discovery Center 8,413 12,805 Sci-Tech Discovery s Girl Power Program provides after-school STEM education to at-risk students at Foreman Elementary School in grades 2nd 5th. The Samaritan Inn, LLC. 62,010 83,690 The Samaritan Inn, LLC. provides transitional shelter and services for homeless persons to individuals and families experiencing homelessness.

Tagged Passions:health, finance, disability, hotel, seniors, risk, services, program, STEM, education, sexual harassment, sexual assault, students, homeless, and behavior

1
Revenues Ad Valorem Tax Base

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and ad valorem

2
Assessed Property Valuations

25.8 25.5 24.7 25.0 25.7 26.9 28.8 31.3 34.4 39.1 42.7 45.1 0.0 4.0 8.0 12.0 16.0 20.0 24.0 28.0 32.0 36.0 40.0 44.0 48.0 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18 18-19 19-20 Va lu e in B ill io ns Fiscal Year Assessed Property Valuations
Tagged Passions:property

3
Change in Plano s Taxable Value

1,523.0 829.8 -1,500 -1,000 -500

0
500

1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 3,500 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 M ill io ns o f D ol la rs Existing Property New Property
Tagged Passions:property

4
Assessed Property Valuations

50 49 50 50 50 49 48 48 50 51 50 50 50 51 52 52 0.0 3.0 6.0 9.0 12.0 15.0 18.0 21.0 24.0 27.0 30.0 33.0 36.0 39.0 42.0 45.0 48.0 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18 18-19 19-20 Va lu e in B ill io ns Fiscal Year Residential Commercial Break-out Residential Commercial 25.7 26.9 28.8 31.3 34.4 39.1 42.7 45.1

Tagged Passions:property and commercial

5
93.1M, 47.8

22.4M, 11.5 79.4M, 40.7

FY 2019-20 City of Plano Property Tax Revenue by Source 194,873,038

Single Family Multi-Family Commercial

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, commercial, and property tax

6
Taxes and the Average Home

Tax Rate Amount
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

City of Plano .4482 1,361 19.3 PISD 1.3374 4,743 67.4 Collin County .1750 631 9.0 CCCCD .0812 304 4.3 TOTAL TAXES/YEAR 2.0418 7,039 100.0

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

2019-20 Proposed Tax Rates (All Taxing Entities Subject to Change)

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and rates

Average Home Value 379,629

Using the 2019-20 Proposed Tax Rates and the 2019 Average Home Value, this assumes that the General Homestead Exemptions were taken for the City of Plano (20 ), for PISD ( 25,000), Collin County (5 ), and CCCCD (greater of 5,000 or 1 ).
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and rates

7
Tax Revenue From Ad Valorem Tax Exemptions

Average Home Value **Total Exemptions APV Revenue Savings From Exemptions Revenue Savings 65 Over Tax Freeze FY 2012-13 243,118 5.37 billion 26.2 million 753,197 FY 2013-14 248,817 5.53 billion 27.0 million 780,493 FY 2014-15 265,930 6.30 billion 30.8 million 1.1 million FY 2015-16 291,717 7.80 billion 38.1 million 1.8 million FY 2016-17 326,099 8.48 billion 40.6 million 2.7 million FY 2017-18 352,496 9.12 billion 42.7 million 3.5 million FY 2018-19 369,050 9.78 billion 45.0 million 4.6 million FY 2019-20 379,629 10.34 billion 46.3 million 5.0 million

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and ad valorem

8
City of Plano Residential Tax Exemptions Tax Freeze

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

20
Homestead Exemption Only on one property

Accounts for a 340 savings annually for the average homeowner. 40,000 Senior/Disability Exemption If 65 over - 65 or disabled Either/Or scenario Accounts for a 179 savings for 65 over homeowner. Each 10K in exemption is approximately 750K in tax revenue.

Tagged Passions:disability, taxes, Taxes, and property

65
Over Tax Freeze Tax is frozen at age 65

Amount cannot go up but can go down Really more like a tax ceiling New improvements will be added to the tax freeze
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

If you move, establishment of a new tax freeze is done on a percent basis called porting

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

9
QUESTIONS?

1
Property Taxes

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

2
Proposed 2019-20 Property Tax Rate

Operating Maintenance Rate = 33.72 cents per 100 valuation
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

Interest Sinking Rate (Debt) = 11.10 cents per 100 valuation

Total Property Tax Rate = 44.82 cents per 100 valuation Equal to a 1.21 cents tax rate decrease from 46.03 cents to

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

44.82 cents per 100 of valuation

3
Ad Valorem Tax Rate vs. Effective Tax Rate

49.85 46.85 45.85 45.35 47.35 48.86 48.86 47.86 46.86 46.03 44.82 48.83 46.87 44.24 42.86 44.32 49.04 52.03 48.06 48.54 47.75 46.96 47.75 45.80 44.13 44.05 44.82 40.00 41.50 43.00 44.50 46.00 47.50 49.00 50.50 52.00 53.50 55.00
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, and ad valorem

Tax Rate History in Cents per 100 Valuation

Ad Valorem Tax Rate Effective Tax Rate
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, ad valorem, and history

4
Property Tax Definitions

Effective Tax Rate Rollback Tax Rate

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

5
Proposed FY 2019-20 Effective Tax Rate

The Effective Tax Rate is basically the tax rate you would pass
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

to collect the same tax revenue as last year (FY 2018-19) using

this year s (FY 2019-20) appraised values. The City s 2019-20 Effective Tax Rate is 44.82 cents which is
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

equal to the recommended tax rate.

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

6
Rollback Tax Rate

The City s 2019-20 Rollback Tax Rate is 47.70 cents or 2.88 cents over the proposed tax rate of 44.82 cents. The rollback rate is not an issue this year because we are proposing a rate less than the rollback tax rate. Our revenue collections will be ( 12,981,568) less than the rollback tax rate of 47.70 cents.
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

7
Tax Rate Publications and Public Hearings

Notice of 2019-20 Tax Year Proposed Tax Rate 44.82 cents Published August 15th in Dallas Morning News Currently running on PTV and posted on website Will conduct a Property Tax Public Hearing on Monday, August 26, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. City Council is set to vote on the Budget, CIP and set the tax

Tagged Passions:council, budget, taxes, Taxes, capital spending, Capital Spending, property, hearing, and property tax

rate on Monday, September 9th.

8
Senate Bill 2

Property Tax Reform
Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

9
Senate Bill 2 New Terminology

Effective Rate Replaced with No-New-Revenue Rollback Rate Replaced with Voter-Approval Rate Mandatory November Election if Rate Set Above Voter-Approval Rate Lowers the Voter-Approval Rate (Rollback Rate) from
Tagged Passions:voting and election

8
to 3.5

Added Unused Increment to the Formula De Minimis Rate for Small Cities

Effective January 1, 2020

No additional detail provided

10
Questions?

Plano Metric Scorecard August 2019

Budget Work Session

Tagged Passions:budget

2
City of Plano Mission Statement

The City of Plano is a regional and national leader, providing outstanding services and facilities through
Tagged Passions:services

cooperative efforts that engage our

citizens and that contribute to the quality of life in our community.

3
Overview

Compare Plano to other large North Texas cities (Populations >100,000)

No additional detail provided

Provide City Council, Residents Staff meaningful points of comparison to inform policy development and budgetary decisions

Today: update from original scorecard presented in January using fresh data
Tagged Passions:council, budget, development, Development, and policy

Request guidance from Council for areas to expand/improve going forward

Tagged Passions:council

4
Average Home Value

No additional detail provided

5
Average Home Value: Sample Range

6
Property Tax Rate

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

7
Change in Property Tax Rate: 2015-16 to 2019-20

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

8
Tax Relief Measures

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

9
City Property Tax Bill to Average Homeowner

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

10
Change in Average City Property Tax Bill to Average Homeowner: 2015-16 to 2019-20

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

11
Property Tax Bill to Average Plano Home: 2016 = 292K, 2020 = 380K

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

12
380K Homes Across DFW Metroplex

No additional detail provided

13
Property Tax Base: Total Taxable Value

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes, Taxes, property, and property tax

14
Local Option Sales Tax

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, Taxes, and Local Option Sales Tax

15
Tax Supported Debt per Capita

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

16
General Obligation Bond Rating - Updated

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:bond

17
Public Safety Accreditation - Updated

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:public safety and accreditation

18
Questions Comments

No additional detail provided

1
Sales Tax Revenues

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, and Taxes

1
2

Sales Tax Cap Policy 2008 Cap on Sales Tax Projections 57 Million Limits the
Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, Taxes, and policy

amount of

collections used for existing operating expenditures Any amount collected over 57M cap One-time expenditures

Capital Maintenance Fund

Economic Development Incentive Fund Offset following year s budget 2012 Cap changed to three-year average Stabilizes revenue source during periods of declining sales tax 2019 Revised methodology to reflect a mid- year true up that re-estimates expected sales tax revenue
Tagged Passions:economic development, budget, sale, taxes, Taxes, development, Development, and incentive

3
Sales Tax Cap Policy Funding Initiatives since 2008

Provided an additional 20.1 million to the Capital Maintenance Fund Capital Maintenance now funded at 75 of annual depreciation - goal 75 Provided an additional 6.8 million to the Economic Development Incentive Fund
Tagged Passions:funding, economic development, sale, taxes, Taxes, development, Development, policy, and incentive

1
million for Salt Sand Storage One-time

500,000 for one-time expenditures at Oak Point Nature Preserve 1.3 million for land located at McDermott and Robinson for Fire

Training Center and Police Sub-station

900K for additional funding for Sand and Salt Facility Construction

Tagged Passions:funding, construction, facility, public safety, and training

4
* FY 2018-19 Re-Estimate. ** FY 2019-20 Proposed Budget.

Annual Sales Tax Receipts 62.3 62.1 56.5 58.0 62.6 69.9 68.7 73.9 76.8 76.3 81.5 85.6 87.7 86.1

Tagged Passions:budget, sale, taxes, and Taxes

0
10

20
30

No additional detail provided

40
50

60 70 80 90 100 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18 18-19* 19-20** M ill io ns 5 Annual Sales Tax Receipt Percentage Changes From Prior Year Actual 12.3 6.2 -0.3 -10.2 3.6 8.0 11.6 -1.6 7.6 3.9 -0.6 6.8 5.0 2.5 -15.0 -10.0 -5.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19* * Projected

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, and Taxes

6
Retail Business to Business Collections Comparison

50 51 51 47 43 42 42 45 44 46 46 45 45 50 49 49 53 57 58 58 55 56 54 54 45 55
Tagged Passions:business

0
5,000,000

10,000,000 15,000,000 20,000,000 25,000,000 30,000,000 35,000,000 40,000,000 45,000,000 50,000,000

2001-2019 YTD As of June 30, 2019

Retail Business to Business

Tagged Passions:business

7
Plano s Major Non-Retail Industries

No additional detail provided

0
1,000,000

2,000,000 3,000,000 4,000,000 5,000,000 6,000,000 7,000,000 8,000,000 9,000,000 10,000,000

8
Geo Area Data

8
9 Envision Oak Point Sales Tax Geo Area

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, and Taxes

10
TOTAL GEO AREA 591,804

Annual data from July 2018 through June 2019

11
Collin Creek Mall Sales Tax Geo Area

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, Taxes, and commercial

12
Annual data from July 2018 through June 2019

No additional detail provided

13
Downtown Sales Tax Geo Area

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, Taxes, and downtown

14
TOTAL GEO AREA 199,786

Annual data from July 2018 through June 2019

15
Legacy Town Center Sales Tax Geo Area

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, and Taxes

16
TOTAL GEO AREA 812,882

Annual data from July 2018 through June 2019

17
Preston Park Sales Tax Geo Area

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, Taxes, and parks

18
TOTAL GEO AREA 2,376,731 TOTAL GEO AREA 2,925,394

Annual data from July 2018 through June 2019

19
Shops of Willow Bend Sales Tax Geo Area

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale, taxes, and Taxes

20
TOTAL GEO AREA 4,114,881 TOTAL GEO AREA 4,342,846

Annual data from July 2018 through June 2019

21
QUESTIONS

No additional detail provided

1
Water Sewer Rates

Tagged Passions:sewer, utility, Utility, water, and rates

2
Water Sewer Fund-

On July 31st, North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) gave the City preliminary projections of 2019-20 Water increasing by 2.4 , from 2.92 to 2.99 per thousand gallons, and Wastewater increasing by 4.7 , from 2.14 to 2.24 per thousand gallons. In addition, the Upper East Fork Interceptor is projected to increase 5.4 , from 1.47 to 1.55 per thousand gallons.
Tagged Passions:sewer, utility, Utility, and water

City of Plano proposed rate increase for water is 2 , however, due to increased wastewater volume, no (0 ) increase is proposed for sewer rates.

The total NTMWD expenditure increase to the 2019-20 Operating Budget is 675,396, or 0.59 , over the 2018-19 Original Budget for a total of 79,892,229 to pay for the Take or Pay Water contract of 26.7 billion gallons. The City has not used the minimum gallons since the water year period that ended July 31, 2001.
Tagged Passions:sewer, budget, utility, Utility, contract, water, and rates

As of 7/31/19 (end of water year), water usage is 18.8 billion gallons, resulting in a net cost to the City of approximately

19.9 million for undelivered water under the NTMWD Take-Or-Pay Agreement. This includes the City projecting to receive a credit from the district of approximately 3.2 million for the unused operating expenditures at the treatment
Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, and water

plant. The credit has not been accounted for in the revised fund summary.

Revised Working Capital at 57 days. Revised Fund Summary included in packet
Tagged Passions:plant

3
Take or Pay Undelivered Water

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, and water

4
Historical Water Usage

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:historical, utility, Utility, and water

5
Water Sewer Rate NTMWD and City of Plano

Tagged Passions:sewer, utility, Utility, and water

6
North Texas Municipal Water District Water Rate Projections

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, and water

As of July 16, 2019 Partnering Meeting

7
History of NTMWD Contract Expenditures

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:contract and history

8
Retain Low Block Water Rate Plan Effective Effective Nov-18 Nov-19

Water Rates -- Residential Monthly Minimum Charge--3/4 24.51 25.00 1,001 5,000 0.75 0.77 5,001 20,000 3.71 3.78 20,001 40,000 7.41 7.56 40,001 Above 8.98 9.16 Water Rates -- Non-Residential Monthly Minimum Charge
Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, water, and rates

3/4 24.51 25.00

1
55.39 56.49

1
1/2 108.51 110.68

2
171.25 174.68

Non-Residential Volume Rate Per 1,000 Gal 1,001 5,000 3.71 3.78 5,001 Above 3.71 3.78 Residential Sprinkler Volume Rate Per 1,000 Gal 1,001 5,000 3.71 3.78 5,001 20,000 3.71 3.78 20,001 Above 7.41 7.56 Commercial Sprinkler Volume Rate Per 1,000 Gal 1,001 5,000 3.71 3.78 5,001 20,000 3.71 3.78 20,001 Above 7.41 7.56
Tagged Passions:commercial

Volume Rate Per 1,000 Gal

Page 40

9
Wastewater Rate Plan Effective Effective Nov-18 Nov-19

Wastewater Rates -- Residential Monthly Minimum Charge 14.67 14.67 Volume Rate/1,000 Gal 5.80 5.80 Wastewater Rates -- Non-Residential Monthly Minimum Charge 3/4 14.67 14.67
Tagged Passions:sewer and rates

1
28.60 28.60

1
1/2 51.73 51.73

2
79.56 79.56

3
153.66 153.66

4
236.99 236.99

No additional detail provided

6
468.60 468.60

8
697.28 697.28

Volume Rate/1,000 Gal 5.80 5.80

10
RESIDENTIAL COMPARISON WITH PLANO HOUSEHOLD AVERAGE MONTHLY USAGE

Page 41

11
COMMERCIAL 2 COMPARISON FOR 50,000 GALLONS

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:commercial

12
TML Water Survey

TML 2019 Water and Wastewater Rate Survey www.tml.org/229/Water-Wastewater-Survey-Results Water Fees by Population Category Population Group No. of Cities Reporting Avg. Total Customers Average Usage 5,000 Gal. 10,000 Gal 50,000 Gal. 200,000 Gal 2,000 or Less 268 406 4,795 43.63 70.27 317.22 1,240.21 2,001 5,000 112 1,282 5,559 40.15 64.35 322.83 1,258.87 5,001 10,000 68 2,620 6,786 37.51 58.31 291.52 1,132.69 10,001 15,000 38 4,358 6,029 34.30 55.87 338.66 1,435.62 15,001 20,000 27 5,476 6,961 31.40 49.73 260.92 864.64 20,001 25,000 11 6,616 7,185 36.96 57.25 259.97 1,006.82 25,001 30,000 9 8,322 7,039 32.69 54.56 276.15 1,010.39 30,001 50,000 27 12,812 8,074 36.73 61.84 324.82 1,149.03 50,001 75,000 9 18,310 6,423 43.73 73.22 378.13 1,282.04 75,001 100,000 8 26,534 9,656 24.59 39.85 215.65 750.55 100,001 200,000 20 38,624 7,345 32.41 54.82 280.31 1,026.84 200,001 350,000 4 75,589 8,879 33.83 57.09 319.96 1,062.89 More than 500,000 4 321,808 6,866 25.32 46.05 244.68 943.64 Total/Averages 605 6,816 5,809 39.76 63.98 310.06 1,193.91 Average Fee for Average Fee for Residential Commercial Page 42

Tagged Passions:sewer, utility, Utility, water, and commercial

13
Plano Water Costs Compared to TML Survey

*TML Survey resulted in 4 responses from cities with population size of between 200,001 350,000

Tagged Passions:utility, Utility, and water

14
TML Wastewater Survey

TML 2019 Water and Wastewater Rate Survey www.tml.org/229/Water-Wastewater-Survey-Results Wastewater Fees by Population Category Population Group No. of Cities Reporting Avg. Total Customers 5,000 Gal. 10,000 Gal 50,000 Gal. 200,000 Gal 2,000 or Less 242 408 27.15 35.71 140.52 480.86 2,001 5,000 115 1,172 33.50 49.42 208.12 752.13 5,001 10,000 66 2,401 31.52 44.46 211.68 769.44 10,001 15,000 38 4,126 36.30 64.24 269.31 909.13 15,001 20,000 27 5,593 32.68 51.15 241.52 917.71 20,001 25,000 11 7,409 41.11 131.44 214.29 866.72 25,001 30,000 9 8,200 34.40 57.55 242.57 976.34 30,001 50,000 27 12,825 34.18 55.09 251.97 948.15 50,001 75,000 9 17,820 35.23 55.70 268.85 945.89 75,001 100,000 8 24,132 26.50 42.59 192.68 697.32 100,001 200,000 20 38,210 28.25 45.04 220.16 807.89 200,001 350,000 4 72,181 30.90 49.83 251.20 912.58 More than 500,000 4 296,955 30.92 54.72 283.18 885.97 Total/Averages 580 6,704 30.67 46.17 193.27 699.49 Average Fee for Average Fee for Residential Commercial Page 43

Tagged Passions:sewer, utility, Utility, water, and commercial

15
Plano Wastewater Costs Compared to TML Survey

*TML Survey resulted in 4 responses from cities with population size of between 200,001 350,000

Tagged Passions:sewer

16
Questions?

Page 44 Pecan Hollow Golf Course Proposed Fee Increase

Tagged Passions:golf

2
Proposed Increase 2019-20

RATE TUES-FRI SAT-SUN Regular 1 3
Tagged Passions:college prep

Super Twilight 1 1

No additional detail provided

Late Twilight 1 1

No additional detail provided

Juniors Seniors 1 n/a

Page 45

Tagged Passions:seniors

3
Fee Comparison Pecan Hollow Plano

Pecan Hollow Plano Watters Creek Plano Traditions Course Firewheel Garland Bridges Course Ridgeview Ranch Plano

Sherrill Park Richardson Course 1

Woodbridge Golf Club Wylie
Tagged Passions:parks and golf

Adults Current Proposed Tues Thur 41 42 45 52 42 44.39 35 Friday 41 42 49 52 49 44.39 45 Sat/Sun 56 59 59 62 64 57.38 55

Tagged Passions:college prep

Seniors Mon Thur 33 (* 28) 34 (* 29) 35 35 (* 30) 32.00 33.56 (*24) 25 Fri 33 (* 28) 34 (* 29) 39 35 (* 30) 32.00 33.56 (*24) 25

Sat/Sun 56 56 52 35 (* 30 after 12:00pm) 54.00 57.38 35 *Punch Card
Tagged Passions:college prep and seniors

4
Proposed Fee Increase

Golf Fund Enterprise Fund 70,000 additional annual revenue Seniors least impacted Last increase 2016 Fee study Page 46 Compensation and Benefits Update

Tagged Passions:compensation, seniors, and golf

2
Strategic Vision for Excellence

Attract and retain the very best employees. Excellent service is expected as the benchmark. Service delivery must be
Tagged Passions:strategic

evaluated within the context of both cost and impact on citizen services. It is recognized that efficiency and effectiveness can be counter balances to each other and the underlying goal is not merely low cost, nor merely high quality, but a high value proposition.

Affirm and Reinforce Plano s Commitment to Exceptional City Services Page 47
Tagged Passions:recognition, services, and government efficiency

3
Employee Compensation

Tagged Passions:compensation

4
Compensation: Private v. Public Private Sector:

Merit Increases Bonus Systems: Organizational Performance Sign-on Referral Across the Board Adjustments (COLA) Stock Options Public Sector: Merit Increases Across the Board Adjustments (COLA) Tenure Pay ( 4 per month/per year. Max: 1,200 for 25 years of employment) Page 48

Tagged Passions:compensation, performance, and employment

5
Compensation Adjustment Linkage: Private

Source Projected Increase
Tagged Passions:compensation

WorldatWork Economic Research Institute (ERI) Willis Towers Watson Business Legal Resources (BLR)

3.2 3 3.1 2.5 -3 Average 3.1

Tagged Passions:business, legal, cell tower, and Cell tower

NOTE: These figures have been constant since 2015

6
Compensation Adjustment Linkage: Public City Projected Adjustment

Tagged Passions:compensation

Allen* Arlington Carrollton^ Denton* Ft. Worth* Frisco** Garland ^^ Grand Prairie Irving* Lewisville* Mesquite McKinney* Richardson*

4
2 4 3 4 3 2 3

2.5 Average 3.0

*Figures are merit based adjustments **Average merit is 4 ( range is 3 -5 ) ^^ Effective 1/1/2020^ Pay plan adjustment

Page 49

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Recommendations for October 1, 2019

No additional detail provided

Employees would receive 3 increase in their base salary

No additional detail provided

8
Across the Board Adjustments

Average Salary Annually Hourly

*Fire hourly rate is based on 40 hour workweek

49,088 1,473 0.713 89,759 2,693 1.293 90,915 2,708 1.303

Application of 3

Page 50

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Employee Benefits

10
Vision The City of Plano Health Plan vision is to

provide affordable health insurance to our employees while encouraging responsible behaviors and quality care that is outcome driven with a focus on prevention. Priorities Invest in Prevention Develop a Disease Specific Attack Plan Cultivate Smart Consumers of Healthcare Member Accountability Data Analysis Page 51
Tagged Passions:health, strategic, insurance, health insurance, healthcare, accountability, and behavior

11
Questions?

Page 52

1
City Council Work Session Additional Festival Discussion

Michelle Hawkins, Arts, Culture Heritage Manager
Tagged Passions:council, arts, manager, and festival

2
New Festival Considerations

Tagged Passions:festival

What s the goal?

Who s the audience?

Does the festival connect with the city s identity? Page 53
Tagged Passions:festival

3
New Festival Considerations

Industry trends- Mega Music Festivals
Tagged Passions:festival

4
Competition

Expectations Innovation Location New Festival Considerations Page 54

Tagged Passions:festival

5
Plano Balloon Fest Example

Expenses Revenue What happened in 2018?

6
Texas Music Revolution Example

History Demographic End of March Page 55
Tagged Passions:history

7
Suggestions

Start with a concept on a small scale Find your following

Ramp up the

Resources

8
Questions?

Michelle Hawkins, Arts, Culture Heritage Manager 972-941-5800 michelleha@plano.gov Page 56 General Fund Update Three-Year Financial Forecast
Tagged Passions:finance, arts, and manager

1
THREE-YEAR FORECAST GENERAL FUND SUMMARY - UPDATE

2019-20 thru 2021-22 2018-19 Re-Estimate 2019-20 2021-22 2021-22 BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 52,213,524 42,627,168 23,191,068 23,234,518 TOTAL RESOURCES 366,630,370 357,152,678 344,696,956 351,569,040 TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 324,003,202 333,961,609 335,389,846 334,245,422 ENDING FUND BALANCE 42,627,168 23,191,068 9,307,110 17,323,617 Required 30 Day Balance 23,156,403 23,234,518 23,110,761 Add'l Revenues or Program Reductions to Meet 30 Days ( 13,927,408) ( 5,787,143)
Tagged Passions:funding and program

DAYS OF OPERATION 51 30 12 22

Debt tax rate transferred to operations 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 Equivalent Amount 0 0 0 Page 57
Tagged Passions:taxes and Taxes

1
Community Investment Program

Tagged Passions:program and investment

2
Community Investment Program

A five-year financial plan which directs development and
Tagged Passions:finance, development, program, Development, and investment

improvements to the city s infrastructure.

Streets Sidewalks Alleys Screening Walls Traffic Signals Parks Trails Athletic Fields Maintenance Facilities City Facilities Fire Stations Police Stations Libraries Service Centers Water Sewer Utility Lines Pump Stations Lift Stations Municipal Drainage Improvements Erosion Control Page 58
Tagged Passions:sewer, streets, utility, Utility, public safety, fire departments and districts, water, parks, trails, Pedestrian, athletics, traffic, library, and stormwater

3
The CIP Covers Five Years

The five-year CIP guides the city s capital planning Year One Outlines projects
Tagged Passions:planning, capital spending, and Capital Spending

included within the

annual appropriation ordinance adopted by Plano City Council Following Four Years A plan for future expenditures, but are not covered by the annual appropriation ordinance Allows for a reasonable time horizon before authorizing future year expenditures via an appropriation ordinance
Tagged Passions:funding, ordinance, and council

4
Proposed 2019-20 CIP Budget 257.8 Million

0.2 6.1 6.8 12.5 32.9 38.6 46.7 114.1 - 20.0 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0 120.0 Technology Public Infrastructure Improvements Municipal Drainage

Tagged Passions:budget, capital spending, Capital Spending, Technology, technology, and stormwater

Plano Event Center Garage

Municipal Facilities Water Sewer Parks Recreation Centers Street Improvements Project Expenditures in Millions Page 59

Tagged Passions:sewer, streets, utility, Utility, events, water, streetscape, parks, and recreation

5
2020 General Obligation Bond Sale Bond Authority Amount Issued

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:sale and bond

2017 Street Improvements 40,000,000

2017 2019 Park Improvements 17,000,000 2017 Recreation Centers 9,100,000 2017 Library Facilities 7,000,000 2013 Public Infrastructure Improvements 6,000,000
Tagged Passions:streets, streetscape, parks, library, and recreation

2019 Existing Municipal Facilities 2,665,000

TOTAL 81,765,000 Park Improvements: Carpenter Park Renovation II, Trail System Projects, Community Neighborhood Park Renovations, High Point Park Maintenance Facility Recreation Centers: High Point Tennis Center Renovation Oak Point Recreation Center Outdoor Pool Construction Library Facilities: Davis Library Expansion Harrington Library Expansion
Tagged Passions:construction, facility, expansion, parks, trails, neighborhood, library, and recreation

6
2019-20 CIP Operating Expenses CIP Category Ongoing Expenses One-Time Expenses Total

Park Development 858,800 35,000 893,800 Police Substation Operations 131,990 662,782 794,772 Fire Training Center Outfitting 0 750,000 750,000 Facilities Maintenance Services 173,308 0 173,307 Recreation Center Operations 11,691 0 11,691 TOTAL 1,175,788 1,447,782 2,623,570 Park Development: Synthetic Turf Maintenance at Carpenter Park, Contractual Maintenance for Los Rios Park and Park Ponds, Maintenance parts, supplies and materials supporting growth development across Park System. Police Substation Operations: Partial year funding for 2 Public Safety Officers, 2 Records Technicians plus furniture, fixtures equipment from Criminal Investigation Fund Facilities Maintenance Services: Partial year funding for utilities, maintenance custodial expenses at Police Substation, Neighborhood Services Building, High Point Tennis Center Fire Administration Building Recreation Center Operations: Sam Johnson Recreation Staffing and Liberty Rec Center Equipment Maintenance (includes additional offsetting revenues) Page 60
Tagged Passions:funding, equipment, utility, development, capital spending, Utility, public safety, Capital Spending, materials, services, training, parks, Development, human resources, neighborhood, growth, and recreation

7
Goal established to have

No additional detail provided

Capital Maintenance Fund

revenues equal 75 of the annual depreciation expense of Plano s governmental assets (Streets, Parks and Municipal Facilities)
Tagged Passions:streets and parks

Capital Maintenance Fund History

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:history

Considered a Government Finance Officers Association Best Practice

Established in 1985 with 1.0 million transfer from General Fund to pay for infrastructure maintenance and replacement projects on a pay-as-you-go basis
Tagged Passions:finance

8
Capital Maintenance Fund

Funded primarily by annual transfers from Operating Funds for rehab and repair projects. Streets Arterial Residential Street Concrete Repair Sidewalk Repairs Replacement Pavement Maintenance
Tagged Passions:funding, streets, and Pedestrian

Screening Wall Reconstruction

Alley Repairs Parks Athletic Field Renovations Playground Equipment Replacement Irrigation Landscape Renovations Trail Repairs Facilities Roof Repairs Replacements HVAC Replacement Flooring Replacement Facility Renovations Painting Utility Others Pump Station Maintenance Rehab Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance Projects Page 61
Tagged Passions:equipment, facility, streets, disability, arts, utility, Utility, parks, trails, buildings and grounds, compliance, and athletics

9
2019-20 Capital Maintenance Funding

57
Tagged Passions:funding

38
44

53 53 70 64 61 53

39
39 38

46 59 68 72 73 67 75 83 82 82

0
25

50 75 100 FY 01 FY 02 FY 03 FY 04 FY 05 FY 06 FY 07 FY 08 FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 FY 15 FY 16 FY 17 FY 18 FY 19* FY 20* FY 21* FY 22* Capital Maintenance Fund Revenues as a of Annual Depreciation

10
QUESTIONS??

Page 62 Memorandum

Date: August 16, 2019

To: Mark D. Israelson, City Manager
Tagged Passions:administrator and manager

From: Robin Reeves, Director of Parks and Recreation

Tagged Passions:parks and recreation

Subject: City of Plano Trail System Funding

History/Background

Tagged Passions:funding, trails, and history

City surveys indicate that trails are one of the most used elements of the City s park system and that continuing to develop the trail system is a high priority for many residents. Construction of trails in the City of Plano began in the 1970 s in conjunction with the adoption of the City s first Park Master Plan. Today there are approximately 83 miles of multiuse concrete trails in Plano. The trails are located within parks throughout the City such as Bob Woodruff Park, Arbor Hills Nature Preserve, Hoblitzelle Park and many others. Trails are also located in flood plain areas such as Chisholm Trail, White Rock Trail Park and Legacy Trail. Two of the City s longest trails, Bluebonnet Trail and Preston Ridge Trail, are located within major electric transmission line easements. Whenever possible, these trails connect to schools and larger parks in the area.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:construction, electric, flooding, parks, trails, education, and easement

One of the City s goals, and a frequent request from trail users, is to connect the various trails around the City to each other and to trails in adjacent cities. As far back as the 1970 s, local cities began discussing the possibility of completing a trail along Rowlett Creek that would run through Garland, Richardson, Plano, Allen, McKinney and Frisco. The Six Cities Trail Plan was developed to identify other trail connections between these cities. Collin County and the North Center Texas Council of Governments have also developed regional trail master plans that include Plano and other area cities. A link to the City of Plano Trail System Map and the Six Cities Trail Plan are included below. The City s Trail System Map identifies all existing and proposed trails. These trails are part of the City s Park Master Plan that was last updated and approved by the Parks and Recreation Planning Board and City Council in the fall of 2018.

https://www.plano.gov/DocumentCenter/View/364/City-Wide-Map-Front?bidId= https://www.plano.gov/DocumentCenter/View/21154 Land for trails has typically been acquired as development takes place. Flood plain and major electric transmission line easements have been acquired as subdivisions or businesses were developed and these otherwise unusable properties were acquired for trails at comparatively low cost to the City. There are still undeveloped areas of the City that create gaps in the trail system. These gaps will only be completed when the City has an opportunity to acquire the land or the easement that is needed. At any given time, it is difficult to predict when various parcels will be available. Their availability is not within the City s control. Multiple options for completing these connections are usually considered and evaluated based on cost, quality of the route and likely availability of the property. This requires us to be flexible in how we allocate our trail funding in order to make it possible to move forward when opportunities present themselves. Page 63 Funding for New Trails
Tagged Passions:planning, funding, business, council, development, subdivision, electric, flooding, parks, trails, Development, property, easement, and recreation

The majority of funding for trails has come through bond elections and grants from other government agencies. The Park Fee Program has also provided funding for trails. Park Fee funding has most often been used to acquire the land while bond funds and grants have funded most of the construction. The Capital Maintenance Fund is used to make major trail repairs. Replacement of large sections of trail will typically be funded by bond programs.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:funding, grant, construction, voting, bond, election, program, parks, and trails

2013 Bond Election Proposition No. 2 - Park Improvements ( 27,000,000) was approved by the voters. 2017 Bond Election Proposition No. 3 Park Improvements ( 78,850,000) was approved by the voters. 11,500,000 from those bond programs is allotted to new trail construction.

Trail construction may also be included in improvements to parks such as Windhaven Meadows Park, Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve and Los Rios Park that all contain trails within the park. Trails within these parks also connect to other major trails in the City. Current Trail Projects
Tagged Passions:construction, voting, bond, election, program, parks, and trails

Cottonwood Creek Greenbelt South - 670,000 Bond Funds, 400,000 County Grant and 437,000 Park Fee Funds.

Legacy Trail from Penelope Lane to Means Drive - 2,100,000 Bond Funds and we have applied for a Collin County Grant. Legacy Trail North of Means Drive - 175,000 allocated for trail design. DART Silver Line (Cotton Belt) Trail Design funded totally by a NCTCOG Grant of 773,054. DART Silver Line (Cotton Belt) Trail - 1,705,000 City of Plano Bond Funds and 1,705,000 Texas Department of Transportation Grant. This is a good example of the need for flexibility. At the time of the 2017 Bond Election, it did not appear that this project would happen for many years. Having flexibility on the timing of projects allowed us to take advantage of the TxDOT matching grant. Oak Point Park Phase II - 750,000 for trail construction in conjunction with other park improvements. Los Rios Park - 750,000 of trail construction in conjunction with other park improvements. Preston Ridge Trail Connection South to Dallas and Richardson - 450,000 allocated at this time for design and easement acquisition. This connection is the highest priority trail for many bicyclists. The project cannot move forward until all easements needed are acquired. It is a very difficult connection to make happen. One owner of a large undeveloped tract of land is not yet willing to move forward with providing an easement until the property is developed. The owner currently has no time frame in mind for when they may choose to develop the property. When that day comes, it would be useful to be prepared to move forward with the easement acquisition and trail construction as soon possible.

Tagged Passions:funding, grant, construction, voting, bond, election, transportation, parks, trails, property, and easement

Trail Repair and Replacement Funding

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:funding and trails

2019 Bond Election Proposition B ( 17,890,000) was approved by the voters and included 1,315,000 for trail replacement along Chisholm Trail and in Hoblitzelle Park.

Annual Capital Maintenance Funds 2019-20 Proposed Budget includes 650,000 for trail repairs.
Tagged Passions:funding, budget, voting, bond, election, parks, and trails

2
Page 64

Trail Maintenance The Parks Division employs two (2) full time Trail Maintenance Technicians to care for existing trails. The general duties of the Trail Technician is to inspect, clean, maintain and repair the trail system. The annual budget allotment specific to the two Trail Technicians (including salary/benefits, work equipment, tools, parts and supplies) is approximately 310,000.
Tagged Passions:equipment, budget, parks, and trails

310,000 is the amount for routine maintenance of the City s trail system. This amount does not include forestry work, signage, mowing, edging, trimming and litter removal along the trails. These functions are performed by other areas with the Parks Division.

Following rain events, other resources within the Parks Division are diverted from their regular duties to assist with trail system clean up, exceeding resources allotted for routine trail inspection, repair and maintenance.
Tagged Passions:advertising, signage, events, parks, trails, and Forestry

Many of the City s trails are located in low-lying areas: along creeks, flood plains, floodways and underpasses. These areas quickly hold water, gather mud and silt, and are slow to drain and dry. Unfortunately, work crews cannot begin working trouble spots until after water has receded enough to allow safe access for equipment and personnel, which can take up to two weeks or more after heavy or sustained rain. Several of the most challenging locations continue to suffer from seeping water long after other areas are completely dry. These areas can be slippery, as the steady stream of seeping water slowly flows over the trail. As the City becomes aware of such areas, the trail is cleaned using a power washer and cautions signs are installed to advise trail users of wet/slippery conditions.

cc: Jack Carr, Deputy City Manager Renee Jordan, Park Planning Manager Ron Smith, Park Services Manager
Tagged Passions:planning, equipment, utility, personnel, Utility, services, water, flooding, parks, trails, administrator, and manager

3
Page 65

Parks Recreation Department Trails

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:parks, trails, and recreation

2
Page 66

3
4

Page 67

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New Trail Funding

Approved Bond Fund Allocation 2013 and 2017 - 11,500,000 ( 4,640,000 spent or encumbered) ( 3,320,000 allocated to current projects or engineering/design)
Tagged Passions:funding, bond, and trails

Federal, State and County Grants 2013 to Present - 7,015,000 ( 4,410,000 spent or encumbered) ( 2,605,000 allocated to current projects)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:grant

Park Fee 2019-20 Budget - 2,424,119

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:budget and parks

6
Trail Repair and Replacement Funding

Tagged Passions:funding and trails

2019 Bond Election - 1,315,000 Trail Replacement Funding

No additional detail provided

Tagged Passions:funding, voting, bond, election, and trails

2019-20 CMF Trail Repair Funds - 650,000

Page 68
Tagged Passions:funding and trails

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Trail Maintenance Funding

General Fund Trail Maintenance Budget - 310,000 Includes 2 FT Employees, salary, benefits, equipment, tools, parts and supplies.

Tagged Passions:funding, equipment, budget, and trails

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