NC - Sylva: BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

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BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

TOWN OF SYLVA BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS PROPOSED AGENDA

REGULAR BOARD MEETING OF THURSDAY MAY 14 2020

No additional detail provided

83
Allen Street

Sylva, North Carolina 5:30 P.M.
Tagged Interests: streets

CALL TO ORDER

APPROVAL OF AGENDA All items listed and adopted are for discussion or possible action.

APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA

PUBLIC coMMENTs

1.
2.

REPORTS Mayor's Report Commissioner's Report Manager' s Report Main Street Report Fire Department Report NEW BUSINESS Main Street Licensing Agreement ABC Board Chairman Appointment ADJOURNMENT CONSENT AGENDA May 14, 2020 APPROVE MINUTES: April 23, 2020, Regular Board Meeting; April 30, 2020, Budget Work Session. 2-BUDGETAMENDMENT: 22 19-530-0000 Contingency 19-530-7400 FD capital 2,000 c 2,000 D

Tagged Interests: business, streets, budget, appointments, fire departments and districts, and manager

REF: To appropriate funds for unexpected sewer pump repair. 520C 23 10-353-0000 1<-9 Donations

Tagged Interests: funding, sewer, utility, donation, Utility, and Donation

520 D10-510-4400 1<-9 Expense REF: To appropriate K-9 Donations into the Police Department budget. 24 10-660-0600 Contingency

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: budget, donation, public safety, and Donation

10-590-3700 Frontier Contract

3,490 c 3,490 D REF: To appropriate contingency to cover Frontier Maintenance Support Contract (3 years). 10-510-0200 PD Wages/Sa1aries 10-510-0100 PD Auxiliary Wages 10-510-0300 PD OT wages 3,000 c 2,000 D 1,000 D

Tagged Interests: contract

REF: To transfer salary within line items to cover short falls.

3- REPORTS: 1- Vehicle Tax Report as of March 31, 2202 2- Ad Valorem Tax Report as of March 31, 2020 3- Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, Changes in Fund Balance as of March 31, 2020 4- Quarterly Finance Report as of March 31, 2020 5- Quarterly Special Revenue Report as of March 31, 2020 4-OTHER: Entegra Bank was purchased by Select Bank and Trust. Attached is a letter that documents that the Town's money will continue to be collateralized based on North Carolina General Statues for public deposits and the North Carolina Administrative Code - Title 20, Chapter 7.
Tagged Interests: finance, taxes, Taxes, purchasing, and ad valorem

Approval of the attached resolutions authorizing the disposition of Town property: (R2020-06) Police Officer badges no longer in service (R2020-07) Police Officer 1<-9 - Don

SYLVA COLLECTIONS YEAR 2012 RENTAL VEHICLE TAX TOTAL TAX 49.71
Tagged Interests: taxes, Taxes, public safety, rental, and property

1
,638.78

1
,688.49

INTEREST 36.41 36.41 1,638.78 ,724.90 CO co

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General Fund Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balances

Revenues: Ad valorem taxes Other taxes and licenses Unrestricted intergovernmental Permits and Fees Restricted intergovernmental Investment earnings Other revenues Total revenues Expenditures: General Government Salaries Benefits Capital outlay All other expenditures Public Safety Salaries Benefits Capital outlay All other expenditures Culture and Recreation Salaries Benefits Capital outlay All other expenditures Transportation Salaries Benefits Capital outlay All other expenditures Economic and Physical Development Salaries Benefits Capital outlay All other expenditures Enviromental Protection Salaries Benefits Capital outlay All other expenditures 2019-2020 Bud eted 671 826 263 300 408,526

Tagged Interests: impact fee, taxes, Taxes, development, public safety, transportation, Development, investment, license, intergovernmental, ad valorem, and recreation

1
994 805 832 275

63,990 102,283 23,875 23,250 55,158

636 725 283 500 53,400

299,825

14
275

14,275 177 160 63 875 113,285 3/31/2020 Previousl Re orted 377,170.68 171 052.91 206,117.77

1
059 991.81 442 001.81

25,252.33 592,737.67

50
928.84 14 242.93

13,799.94 22,885.97

342 838.46 172,791.09

170,047.37

4
425.79

4,425.79

95
869.31 36 325.94

59,543.37

General Fund Actual to

Budget Statement 2019-2020 YTD Actual

Current Month Percent2019-2020 Bud et Balance Period Variance 305.00

Tagged Interests: budget

1
091 215.72 s 177,116.48 737.50

6
470.78

s s s 855.00 518,256.28 4,597.76 50,791.12 5,676.30 (18,785.01) 3161,070.92 424 498.88 191 291.72 233,207.16

1
201 908.79 474,072.66

39,466.15 688,369.98

53
868.31 15,776.60

13,799.94 24,291.77 383 337.53 177 790.92 205,546.61

7
288.79

7,288.79 110 851.26 43 939.52 66,911.74 217 324.95 s 517 866.08 s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s 45,497.70 20 238.81 25,258.89 134,168.98 61,294.51 14,213.82 58,660.65

Tagged Interests: 911

2
939.47 1 533.67

1,405.80 37,638.27 16,984.85 20,653.42 2,863.00 2,863.00 14,266.75 4 824.92 9,441.83 247,327.12 792,896.21 48,414.69 253,387.47 6,986.21 66,308.74

2
181 753.56Total 2 2 1 415 320.44237 374.17

86.85 67.80 74.46 61.35 90.44 178.93 85.92 63.19 60.25 52.67 60.20 51.06 62.57 60.65 -24.95

9
75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00

75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00

11.85 -7.20

No additional detail provided

-0.54 -13.65

15.44 103.93 10.92 11.81 14.75 22.33 14.80 23.94 12.43 14.35

Revenues over expenditures

Other financing sources (uses):

Transfers in Appropriated fund balance Contributed Capital Sale of Assets Loan Proceeds Transfers to other funds: Transfers out Transfer to Capital Reserve Total other financing sources (uses) Revenues and other sources over expenditures and other uses Analysis: s s s s s s s s s 81,863 393,985 364,324 758,309 840,172 840 172 (81,863) 1,011,692.15 393,985.00 364,324.00 758,309.00 718,672.00 121,500.00 840,172.00 (81,863.00) 929,829.15 979,317.36 393,985.00 364,324.00 758,309.00 718,672.00 121,500.00 840,172.00 (81,863.00) (20,049.22) (897,454.36) (897,454.36)
Tagged Interests: funding and sale

Timing Of State Revenues and Grants

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Tagged Interests: grant

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Town of Sylva Special Revenue Funds Quarterly Report

Tagged Interests: funding

Public Art Fund (Fund 23): Original Ordinance (2017-01) Fund Balance (6/30/2019) Revenue - Donations/ Interest

Expenditures Balance to Date

Tagged Interests: ordinance, arts, donation, and Donation

Sidewalk SRF (Fund 27): Note: Amended from RLFOriginal Ordinance (2017-02)

Tagged Interests: ordinance, streets, and Pedestrian

Budget Amendment 1 (Skyland Drive 7/11/19) GF Transfer In from GF (Hwy 107) Revenue/lnterest

Expenditures (Skyland Drive) Balance to Date 506 3,165 -1,351 2,320 103,713 174,687 150,000 4,324 -17,200 415,524 Select Bank Lynn Bryant, Chief Financial Officer

Tagged Interests: finance and budget

Town of Sylva 83 Allen Street

Sylva, NC 28779
Tagged Interests: streets

RE: General Fund-Money Market and General Fund Central Depository Collateralization Rules For Public Deposits

Dear Lynn, This letter is to inform you that Select Bank Trust complies with North Carolina General Statutes as it relates to the collaterization rules for public deposits. More specifically, we will collaterize deposits referenced above in compliance with rules noted in the North Carolina Administrative Code-Title 20, Chapter 7. This will also apply to the Town's current deposit relationship in place with Select Bank and Trust. It would also apply to any sweep services the Town may elect. Let me know if you have any questions in regards to the above. Again, we appreciate your relationship with Select Bank and Trust and look forward to providing you the quality of service you so rightfully deserve. Sincerely, J rry H. Olli ice Presi nt ylva Office 1-877-610-7315 10020-06

Tagged Interests: market, services, and compliance

Resolution Authorizing the Disposition of Town Property

WHEREAS, the Town of Sylva, North Carolina desires to declare surplus and dispose of certain Town owned personal property; and
Tagged Interests: surplus and property

WHEREAS, G.S. 160A-266 allows for the disposal of Town owned property; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Sylva Police Department has purchased new badges for the entire department; and WHEREAS, the Town of Sylva Police Department desires to dispose of the badges previously used in service; and
Tagged Interests: public safety, purchasing, and property

WHEREAS, the estimated value of the surplus property is estimated to be 1,000 or greater; and

WHEREAS, the badges will be donated to the officers of the Town of Sylva Police Department; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town of sylva Board of Commissioners that the following described property is hereby declared to be surplus to the needs of the Town: Police Officer Badges no longer in service
Tagged Interests: public safety, surplus, and property

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Town Manager is hereby authorized to dispose of the aforementioned personal property by any means allowable by law.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: property and manager

Adopted this the 14th day of May, 2020

Lynda Sossamon, Mayor Town of Sylva

Attest: Amanda W. Murajda, Town Clerk Town of Sylva R2020-07

Resolution Authorizing the Disposition of Town Property

WHEREAS, the Town of Sylva, North Carolina desires to declare surplus and dispose of certain Town owned personal property; and
Tagged Interests: surplus and property

WHEREAS, G.S. 160A-266 allows for the disposal of Town owned property; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Sylva Police Department implemented a 1<-9 officer program in October 2016; and WHEREAS, the Town of Sylva Police Department purchased their first K-9, Don, a Belgian Malinois in November 2016; and WHEREAS, the Town of Sylva Police Department desires to retire K-9 Don due to health issues affecting his ability to perform essential job functions; and
Tagged Interests: health, public safety, program, purchasing, and property

WHEREAS, the estimated value of the surplus property is estimated to be 1,000 or greater; and

WHEREAS, 1<-9 Don will be donated to his respective K-9 officer; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town of sylva Board of Commissioners that the following described property is hereby declared to be surplus to the needs of the Town: o Police Officer K-9 Don
Tagged Interests: public safety, surplus, and property

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Town Manager is hereby authorized to dispose of the aforementioned personal property by any means allowable by law.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: property and manager

Adopted this the 14th day of May, 2020

Lynda Sossamon, Mayor Town of Sylva

Attest: Amanda W. Murajda, Town Clerk Town of Sylva

REGULAR BOARD MEETING Town of Sylva Board of Commissioners

The Town of Sylva Board of Commissioners held a regular meeting on April 23, 2020 at 9:00 a.m. hosted in the Board Room of Municipal Hall, 83 Allen Street, Sylva, N.C. and held electronically by Zoom meeting. PRESENT: ABSENT: Lynda Sossamon, Mayor Barbara Hamilton, Vice-Mayor Mary Gelbaugh, Commissioner Ben Guiney, Commissioner Greg McPherson, Commissioner David Nestler, Commissioner
Tagged Interests: streets

Paige Dowling, Town Manager Amanda Murajda, Town Clerk Eric Ridenour, Town Attorney

Mayor Sossamon called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m. STAFF PRESENT: Lynn Bryant (Finance Officer), Chris Hatton (Police Chief) and Jake Scott (Public Works Director).
Tagged Interests: finance, legal, public safety, Public Works, public works, and manager

VISITORS: Kelly Donaldson, Julie Donaldson, Rose Bauguess, Dave Russell, Holly Kays, Kin Cook, Anita Puerto, David Porter and Zac Newland.

AGENDA: Commissioner Hamilton made a motion to approve the agenda. The motion carries with a unanbnous vote. CONSENT AGENDA: Commissioner Gelbaugh made a motion to approve the consent agenda. The motion carries with a unanimous vote. PUBLIC COMMENTS: None.

MAYOR'S REPORT: Mayor Sossamon thanked all staff, emergency management and Jackson County who has worked hard during this time of the Coronavirus pandemic. Sossamon had been attending webinars related to the virus and management.

COMMISSIONER'S REPORT: Commissioner Nestler reported that the Community Table is seeing a greater number of attendees, thus the need for food donation is greater. He also reported that TWSA had revised their cutoff and late fees in accordance with state guidelines during the pandemic. Commissioner Guiney thanked Town staff for their dedication and work during the pandemic. He reminded everyone to keep social distancing and using masks and gloves. Commissioner McPherson noted he was proud of the Town for their response during the pandemic. Commissioner Hamilton thanked the Police Department and Public Works Department for their work. MANAGERS REPORT: Manager Dowling reported the following: Draft Budget Budget Process: The board has received their draft budget for FY 2020-2021. The draft budget will be posted on the Town's website. The next budget work session is Thursday, April 30, 2020 at 9:00 a.m.
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, impact fee, budget, donation, public safety, Donation, emergency, Public Works, public works, and manager

COVID-19 Operational Update: All staff are continuing to conduct business through calls and emails, handling financial duties, and working on the budget. All staff are attending various office hours and teleconferences with the NC League of Municipalities, School of Government, and our own state associations for our positions. There are weekly calls with those our state associations. Dowling thanked the Town staff for their hard work and dedication during this unprecedented time and the Board for their support and understanding.

Tagged Interests: coronavirus, business, finance, budget, and education

Regular Board Meeting April 23, 2020 2

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT: Jake Scott reported that blush pick-up had tripled, they are running 2 garbage trucks to comply with social distancing, limiting access to store purchases and are providing masks, gloves and sanitizer to employees. Scott announced that he had received notification that a grant was funded through the Community Waste Reduction and Recycling Grant. That money will be used for cans on Mill Street and Bridge Park. The department has also purchased, in conjunction with the Police Department, a traffic cone trailer. He thanked administrative staff for their support during the pandemic. POLICE DEPARTMENT: Chris Hatton reported that the department was adjusting to a new way of policing because of the Covid-19 pandemic. They have seen an increase in the homeless population in Sylva, possibly due to the virus. He commended the Jackson County Emergency Management Department for their work during the pandemic and thanked the Town staff for their work. Sergeant Hyatt has just completed K-9 training. PLANNING BOARD REPORT: The March and April meetings were cancelled because of the virus. Ordinance review work by Kristy Carter will be completed in May. NEW BUSINESS CHANGE TIME OF MAY 28, 2020 REGULAR BOARD MEETING TO 5:30 P.M.: Commissioner Nestler made a motion to change the time of the May 28, 2020 meeting to 5:30 p.m. due to the budget public hearing. The ntotion carried with a unanimous vote. RESOLUTION FOR NCDOT TO ASSUME OWNERSHIP OF CALDWELL STREET: Manager Dowling explained that with the R-5600 project, changes to the Sunrise Park and Cherry Street intersections with NC- 107 will put more traffic on Caldwell Street. Caldwell Street's traffic counts average 1,400 cars per day now. NCDOT projects an increase of 1,200, which would bring the traffic count to an estimated 2,600 after the construction is completed. This is only an estimate, but traffic on Caldwell Street will increase since traffic from Sunrise Park travelling North onto 23-Business and West towards downtown will need to travel on Caldwell Street, to the traffic signal on Cherry Street, and tum onto NC-107. This resolution is the Town's official request for NCDOT to take over the maintenance of Caldwell Street. The street is 0.17 miles, so the Powell Bill funds we receive based on the street are limited. NCDOT typically requires a street meet their standards of 1 8' wide with 3' shoulder before they will take over maintenance, but it needs to be an official request since Caldwell Street is in the project area and the traffic volume is increasing significantly. Commissioner Nestler made a motion to approve the resolution. The motion carried with a unanimous vote. RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING REMOTE/ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION OF BOARD MEMEBERS: This resolution authorizes the Town of Sylva Board of Commissioners to meet electronically during a state of emergency declaration. This includes local, state, or federal declarations. Commissioner McPherson made a motion to approve the resohdion. The motion carried with a unanimous vote.
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, planning, funding, grant, ordinance, recognition, construction, business, streets, budget, travel, public safety, hotel, downtown, transportation, emergency, purchasing, training, parks, Public Works, public works, recycling, hearing, commercial, manager, traffic, and homeless

DILLSBORO BRIDGE DISCUSSION: A request from Ted Adams, NCDOT Construction Engineer, was received wanting to know if Sylva has an issue with the contractor closing the bridge between Sylva and Dillsboro instead of building a temporary bridge beside the original bridge. There will be another temporary bridge on Hometown Place Road (behind B A1's) that connects to the Monteith Park/Appalachian Women's Museum for local and emergency traffic. The official detour will be from Exit 83 to US-74/US-441. The benefit of closing the bridge and having a detour is the project time is expected to be reduced from 3 year to 9 months. There will be a 3- month period (June 8 - September 25) where there will not be a bridge at all. This will increase emergency response time. The construction firm on the project wants Dillsboro, Sylva, and Jackson County to weigh in on their thoughts. Jake Scott noted that he is concerned about the rushed timeline and thinks transparency is even more important during this time. Manage Dowling is also concerned that the 2015 public comments are not being utilized. Chris Hatton is concerned with traffic issues and challenges as well as public safety and emergencies during a rushed timeframe. Commissioner Guiney echoed the concerns mentioned about the timeline. Commissioners Gelbaugh, Hamilton, McPherson and Nestler also noted their concerns with the change in consfi uction time. Rose Bauguess, of the Southwestern Commission, added that the timeframe seemed rushed and that greater analysis would have typically been completed on freight management.

The Board of Commissioners discussed drafting a letter to NCDOT stating their opposition to changes in the construction timeline and closing bridges between Sylva and Dillsboro instead of building a temporary bridge.
Tagged Interests: contractor, Homebuilder, construction, boards and commissions, streets, public safety, emergency, parks, and traffic

Regular Board Meeting April 23, 2020 3

Manager Dowling will draft the letter for the board to review. This is a time sensitive issue and must be addressed

by the following day.

Tagged Interests: manager

ADJOURNMENT: Conunissioner Guiney made a motion to adjourn the meeting at 10:00 a.m. The motion carries with a unanimous vote.

Lynda Sossamon Mayor Amanda W. Murajda Town Clerk

BUDGET WORK SESSION Town of Sylva Board of Commissioners

The Town of Sylva Board of Commissioners held a budget work session on April 30, 2020 at 9:00 a.m. hosted in the Board Room of Municipal Hall, 83 Allen Street, Sylva, N.C. and held electronically by Zoom meeting. PRESENT: ABSENT: Lynda Sossamon, Mayor Barbara Hamilton, Vice-Mayor Mary Gelbaugh, Commissioner Ben Guiney, Commissioner Greg McPherson, Commissioner David Nestler, Commissioner
Tagged Interests: streets and budget

Paige Dowling, Town Manager Amanda Murajda, Town Clerk

Mayor Sossamon called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m. STAFF PRESENT: Lynn Bryant (Finance Officer), Chris Hatton (Police Chief) and Jake Scott (Public Works Director). VISITORS: Dave Russell and Holly Kays.
Tagged Interests: finance, public safety, Public Works, public works, and manager

CALLED TO ORDER: The budget work session was called to order at 9:00 a.m.

Tagged Interests: budget

OVERVIEW OF BUDGET PROCESS/UPDATE ON FINANCIAL CONDITION: Manager Dowling reviewed the budget process and calendar for the upcoming meetings. She reminded the board that the budget is a planning document for the upcoming fiscal year and that it is the board's budget. She told the board that department heads submitted requests and staff has been working on balancing the budget. Dowling presented the board with a preliminary budget and reviewed upcoming changes.

Upcoming Changes: -Economy downfall during COVID-19 pandemic -Main Street Director-part-time contract position -Ordinance review as required by general statutes
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, planning, ordinance, finance, streets, budget, contract, manager, and economy

DISCUSSION: Review of Preliminary FY 2020-2021 Budget:

Manager Dowling reviewed the line item budget with the board. -Main Street Director this position has been added to contracted services and is expected to be a part-time contract position -Commissioner Gelbaugh questioned if the GUTM Coordinator position would be eliminated because this position would be created. Manager Dowling reported that the GUTM position would not be eliminated and that person would focus on the festival. -Ordinance review general statutes will require a land use plan to be established by 2021 and the money set aside in the proposed budget will be to fund the review and development of such requirements. -Police Vehicles in budget requests for the upcoming year, Chief Hatton requested Dodge Durango SUVs for the 2020-2021 replacement schedule. The SUVs cost approximately 6,000- 7,000 more than Dodge Chargers. The consensus of the board was to change the request to Chargers to save money during an already tight budget. -Parking Lot Rental An addition 2,700 has been added to the proposed budget for the full cost of renting the Cogdill parking lot. The Town rented a parking lot owned by First Baptist Church during 2019-2020. Manager Dowling asked the Board if they were interested in renting that lot for 2020-2021. The monthly amount would increase from 255 to 400. The Board discussed the pros and cons of renting the lot and ultimately the consensus was to rent the lot for the 2020-2021 budget year.

Tagged Interests: ordinance, streets, budget, development, contract, public safety, services, church, Development, rental, manager, festival, and parking

April 30, 2020 Budget Work Session

-Fund Balance Manager Dowling reported that in light of having to take money from fund balance to balance the 2020-2021 budget, the Town's fund balance percentage was still very healthy. She reiterated the impoftance of keeping a healthy fund balance for times such as these.

Tagged Interests: budget and manager

Fee Schedule: The board discussed the proposed fee schedule and did not have changes at this time.

No additional detail provided

Next Meeting: A tentative budget work session is scheduled for May 14, 2020 at 3:00 p.m.

Budget Public Hearing: A public hearing for the FY 2020-2021 budget will be on May 28, 2020 at 5:30 p.m.

Tagged Interests: budget and hearing

ADJOURNMENT: Commissioner Hamilton made a motion to adjourn the meeting at 10:45 a.m. The motion

No additional detail provided

2
carries with a unanimous vote.

Lynda Sossamon Mayor

Amanda Murajda Town Clerk

20.
'2.'110

No additional detail provided

Name of City/ Town: Sylva

Date: May 14, 2020

2020-2021 Annual Agreement North Carolina Main Street@ Designation

Tagged Interests: streets

Designated Main Street communities (Main Street Director and Main Street Board Chair or City/ Town Manager) must sign this document and return to the NC Main Street Rural Planning Center no later than June 30 2020 to remain

Tagged Interests: planning, rural, streets, and manager

active in the program.

Tagged Interests: program

A
signed document confirms that the local Main Street program has a thorough understanding of the benefits and

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: streets and program

requirements of active participation in the NC Main Street program. In July 2020, so that the local government

understand the benefits and requirements and as a means of communication, the NC Main Street Rural Planning
Tagged Interests: planning, rural, streets, program, communications, and Communications

Center will send a signed copy to the Town/City Manager, if they were not required to sign.

Tagged Interests: administrator and manager

Retain a signed copy for your records, and return an original, signed copy of the entire document by mail or a scanned,

signed copy of the entire document by email (preferred method) no later than June 30, 2020, to: To: Naomi Riley, Coordinator, Downtown Services NC Main Street Rural Planning Center 4346 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699-4346 Naomi.riley@nccommerce.com Program Background
Tagged Interests: planning, rural, streets, downtown, services, and program

Nationally: Main Street America has been helping revitalize older and historic commercial districts for nearly 40 years. Today it is a network of more than 1,200 neighborhoods and communities, rural and urban, who share both a commitment to place and to building stronger communities through preservation-based economic development. Main Street America is

a program of the nonprofit National Main Street Center, a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Main Street AmericaTM is a movement. Main Street America has been helping revitalize older and historic commercial districts for nearly 40 years. It is the leading voice for preservation-based economic development and community revitalization across the country. Made up of small towns, mid-sized communities, and urban commercial districts, Main
Tagged Interests: nonprofit, Homebuilder, historic preservation, rural, economic development, streets, development, historic, program, Development, preservation, commercial, and neighborhood

NC Main Street Rural Planning Center NC Department of Commerce Rural Economic Development Division-

5/8/20204346 Mail Setvice Center, Raleigh NC 27699-4346 (919) 8144658

Tagged Interests: planning, rural, economic development, streets, development, and Development

2
P age 2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION

Street America represents the broad diversity that makes this country so unique. Working together, the programs that
Tagged Interests: streets, program, and diversity

make up the Main Street America network help to breathe new life into the places people call home.

Main Street America is a mark of distinction. It is a seal, recognizing that participating programs, organizations, and communities are part of a national movement with a proven track record for celebrating community character, preserving local history, and generating impressive economic returns. Since 1980, over 2,000 communities have been
Tagged Interests: recognition, streets, program, and history

part of Main Street, bringing renewed energy and activity to America's downtowns and commercial districts, securing

79 billion in new investment creating 640,017 net new jobs and rehabilitating 284,936 buildings. Main Street America is a time-tested strategy. Main Street America communities are encouraged to make use of a time-
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, strategic, streets, downtown, investment, commercial, energy, jobs, and job creation

tested approach, known as the Main Street Approach. The Main Street Approach is rooted in a commitment to broad- based community engagement, a holistic understanding of the factors that impact the quality of life in a community, and

strategic focus on the core principles of downtown and neighborhood revitalization: Economic Vitality, Quality Design, Effective Promotion, and Sustainable Organization. For more information, visit www.mainstreet.org. In North Carolina: The NC Main Street Rural Planning Center within the N.C. Department of Commerce, is the licensed agency that is charged with administering the Main Street program throughout the state. The Center is committed to following the

Tagged Interests: planning, rural, strategic, streets, downtown, program, license, and neighborhood

program guidelines and licensing agreement as outlined by the National Main Street Center and signed by the N.C.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: streets and program

Department of Commerce.

The N.C. Department of Commerce designates communities as a North Carolina Main Street community . When designated, the local city or town government, and specifically the chief elected official, is notified of the designation. The city or town government determines who will administer the Main Street program at the local level and the city or town From time-to-time, thatmanager communicates that information to the N.C. Main Street Rural Planning Center. administration may change. If there is a change, this document outlines the steps that must be followed for a change in local administration to occur. Since 1980, over 111 communities have directly benefitted from the North Carolina Main Street program, bringing
Tagged Interests: planning, rural, streets, and program

economic strength to North Carolina's downtown commercial districts, securing 3.25 billion in new investment creating

more than 27,000 net new jobs and rehabilitating 6,600 buildings. Benefits for NC Main Street Communities North Carolina Main Street communities benefit from the following: 2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION Partnership:

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, streets, downtown, investment, commercial, jobs, and job creation

Communities selected to participate in the Main Street program become partners with the North Carolina

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: streets and program

Department of Commerce, NC Main Street Rural Planning Center in a long-term, asset-based economic

Tagged Interests: planning, rural, and streets

development effort that has proven to have a positive impact on investment and job creation. Main Street communities are limited in number and therefore receive focused and personal attention from NC

Main Street staff. North Carolina communities are selected through a competitive process and only a few are designated; therefore, Main Street designation is an honor bestowed upon only a few special communities. In the first three years of a local Main Street program, the state of North Carolina invests approximately 100,000 in on-site visits, training and technical assistance. After the initial start-up phase, the state annually invests approximately 5,000 in each Main Street community in the form of ongoing town-specific technical assistance, and statewide and on-site training for directors and volunteers. Training: Main Street communities are eligible to attend and participate in the NC Main Street Conference, NC Main Street
Tagged Interests: streets, development, program, training, Development, investment, volunteer, and job creation

Basic Training, Board and Committee Training, NC Main Street Directors' Meetings, Biannual Regional Meetings,

and subject specific workshops. Designated North Carolina Main Street communities receive two free registrations to the North Carolina Main Street Conference held in March. Technical Assistance: The North Carolina Main Street program staff guides designated communities through a strategic planning process which helps communities create a vision, develop strategies and produce action plans so that limited resources are focused, and results are magnified. The North Carolina Main Street staff guide participating communities through board development, volunteer development and downtown director training. The North Carolina Main Street staff provide guidance and support to communities on ways to find and develop financial resources. Property and business owners in Main Street cities receive free building exterior design recommendations from design specialists at the UNC-Greensboro School of Interior Architecture, in collaboration with the NC Main Street
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, planning, business, finance, strategic, streets, development, downtown, program, training, Development, property, education, and volunteer

Rural Planning Center staff.

North Carolina Main Street staff has extensive experience in organizational development and nonprofit management, historic preservation, building rehabilitation, investment tax credits, incentive programs, tourism development, marketing, image building, special event development, communications, and a range of other pertinent areas. The North Carolina Main Street staff is among the nation's leading authorities on downtown development with experience helping North Carolina towns with revitalization challenges. The North Carolina Main Street staff assists communities with Main Street Director recruitment and selection. The North Carolina Main Street staff conducts an annual program assessment and review of each Main Street program. The North Carolina Main Street staff conducts an annual budget and salary analysis of Main Street programs. The North Carolina Main Street staff conducts an annual statistical data collection and analysis.

Tagged Interests: nonprofit, Homebuilder, historic preservation, planning, rural, market, streets, budget, taxes, Taxes, development, tourism, historic, downtown, events, program, Development, communications, preservation, investment, Communications, selection, and incentive

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2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION North Carolina Main Street communities may use the Main Street trademarks on materials designed to promote the work of their program in collaboration with the State of North Carolina and the National Main Street Center. The North Carolina Main Street network possesses some of the most experienced downtown development

Tagged Interests: streets, development, downtown, materials, program, and Development

professionals in the country.

Main Street communities may take advantage of and participate in a special network of Main Street cities statewide and nationally, with over 1,600 communities across the nation, and 45 city, state, and regional Coordinating Programs, that participate in the Main Street program. This allows them to learn best practices, techniques and strategies for downtown development. Funding: When available, Main Street communities are eligible to apply for Main Street Solutions Funds, or other such NC Main Street funding programs, to assist small business development and property rehabilitation. The NC Main Street Rural Planning Center maintains and distributes a funding guide of federal, state, corporate and foundation sources commonly used for funding downtown projects. Resources: Through the North Carolina Main Street program, communities can identify resource people, consultants and specialists on topics of interest to the community. Economic Impact: Since 1980 when the program began, Main Street communities in North Carolina have had over 3.25 billion in new investment in their downtowns, a net gain of over 6,500 new businesses and a net gain of over 27,000 new jobs. This is serious economic development The North Carolina Main Street staff facilitate statewide economic impact studies and collects data to determine trends in Main Street and Small Town Main Street communities. Recognition:
Tagged Interests: planning, funding, rural, recognition, business, economic development, streets, development, downtown, services, program, Development, small business, property, investment, foundation, and jobs

Designated North Carolina Main Street communities are eligible to receive statewide recognition through the

North Carolina Main Street Awards and Main Street Champions programs. In addition, designated communities are eligible for recognition by the National Main Street Center as a Nationally

Tagged Interests: recognition, streets, and program

Accredited Main Street community.

Tagged Interests: streets

Designated North Carolina Main Street communities are eligible to apply for national recognition from the National

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Tagged Interests: recognition and streets

Main Street Center through the Great American Main Street Awards@ (GAMSA) program. North Carolina Main Street communities receive publicity about their programs through press releases distributed

through the N.C. Department of Commerce, NC Main Street Rural Planning Center newsletters and annual reports, Main Street presentations and the NC Main Street Center social media sites. P a ge 2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION51

Tagged Interests: planning, rural, sites, streets, program, and social media law

*Note in the event of a natural disaster or pandemic event, programs and services may be changed, conducted virtually or cancelled in accordance to

recommended guidelines from the Center for Disease Control and NC State Emergency Management.
Tagged Interests: services, events, program, and emergency

Requirements of Designated N.C Main Street Communities

Main Street communities must be 50,000 and under in population at the time of designation.
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Participate in all services provided to the local community by the NC Main Street Rural Planning Center.

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Tagged Interests: planning, rural, streets, and services

Employ a full-time - 40 hours/week paid professional Main Street Director, who is dedicated to downtown and will coordinate and facilitate the work of the program. Communities with a population of 5,001-9,999 MAY

employ two or more persons that equal one or more full-time equivalent position(s). One of the positions must be designated as the director. Communities with a population of 5,000 or less MAY employ a part-time - 20+ hours/week position paid professional Main Street Director. The Main Street Director should be paid a salary consistent with those of other community development professionals within the city, state, or region in which the program operates. The Director should be adequately trained and should continue learning about revitalization techniques and about issues affecting traditional commercial districts. The Director should have a written job description that correlates with the roles and responsibilities of a Main Street Director. There should be a formal system in place for evaluating the performance of the Director on an annual basis. Adequate staff management policies and procedures should be in place. Obtain a 501(c) 3, 4, or 6 nonprofit designation OR be designated as a department of the local municipal government.

Tagged Interests: nonprofit, streets, development, downtown, procedure, program, performance, Development, commercial, and community development

Establish broad-based support for the commercial district revitalization process with strong support from both

the public and private sectors. The Main Street organization should have the active participation of various stakeholders at the committee and board levels. Participants should contribute financial, in-kind, and volunteer support for the revitalization program. Participants should look for, and act on, opportunities to make connections between other programs or organizations in order to form partnerships that help further the revitalization process. The program should include an ongoing process for volunteer recruitment, orientation, and recognition, constantly refreshing its pool of volunteers and involving new people each year. The revitalization program has broad-based philosophical support from the community. Municipal government demonstrates a philosophical commitment to commercial district revitalization. Establish and maintain an active Board of Directors and Committees using the Main Street Four-Point Approach@ and develop a comprehensive Main Street Work Plan using the Main Street Four-Point Approach@. Main Street revitalization by nature is a community-driven process. Therefore, community members must take an active role in leading and implementing positive change. While the Director is responsible for facilitating the work of volunteers, this staff member is not tasked with single-handedly revitalizing the commercial district. The direct involvement of an active board of directors and committees are keys to success.

Tagged Interests: recognition, finance, streets, program, commercial, and volunteer

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P age 2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION

If a Main Street organization is housed within another entity (e.g., a community development corporation), it is still important to have its own board of directors and committee structure. The board is a working, functional board that understands its roles and responsibilities and is willing to put forth the effort to make the program succeed. Committee members assume responsibility for the implementation of the work plan. The program has a dedicated governing body, its own rules of operation, its own budget, and its own bylaws, and is empowered to carry out Main Street's mission, even if the Main Street program is a part of a larger organization. The board has well-managed, regular monthly meetings, with an agenda and regular distribution of minutes. Committees have regularly scheduled monthly meetings with an agenda that addresses the committee work plan. Establish an annual work plan/planning process for downtown. A comprehensive annual work plan provides a detailed blueprint for the Main Street program's activities; reinforces the program's accountability both within the organization and in the broader community; and provides measurable objectives by which the program can track its progress. The work plan should contain a balance of activities in each of the four broad program areas that comprise the Main Street approach Economic Vitality, Quality Design, Effective Promotion, and Sustainable Organization. The work plan should contain measurable objectives, including timelines, budgets, desired outcomes, and specific responsibilities. The work plan should be reviewed, and a new one should be developed annually. Ideally, the full board and committees will be involved in developing the annual work plan. At a minimum, the full board should adopt/approve the annual work plan. The work plan should distribute work activities and tasks to a broad range of volunteers and program
Tagged Interests: planning, streets, budget, development, downtown, program, Development, accountability, volunteer, and community development

pa rticipants. There has been significant progress in each of the four points based on the work plan submitted for the

previous year. Adopt and exhibit a Historic Preservation Ethic and design management program. Historic preservation is central to the Main Street program's purpose and is what makes historic and traditional commercial districts authentic places. Historic preservation involves saving, rehabilitating, and finding new uses for existing buildings, as well as intensifying the uses of the existing buildings, through building improvement projects and policy and regulatory changes that make it easier to develop property within the commercial district. The program has, or is working toward putting in place, an active and effective design management program (which may include financial incentives, design assistance, regulatory relief, design review, education, and other forms of management). The program encourages appropriate building renovation, restoration, and rehabilitation projects. When faced with a potential demolition or substantial structural alteration of a significant, historic, or traditional building in the Main Street district, the program actively works to prevent the demolition or alteration, including working with appropriate partners at the state, local, or national level to attempt to stay or alter the proposed activity; developing alternative strategies for the building's use; and/or educating local leaders about the importance of retaining existing buildings and maintaining their architectural integrity.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, historic preservation, regulation, finance, streets, historic, program, preservation, property, demolition, commercial, education, policy, and incentive

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P a ge 2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION The program works to find creative adaptive use, financing, and physical rehabilitation solutions for preserving old buildings. The program recognizes the importance of planning and land-use policies that support the revitalization of existing commercial centers and works toward putting planning and land-use policies in place that make it as easy (if not easier) to develop property within the commercial district as it is outside the commercial district. Similarly, it ensures that financing, technical assistance, and other incentives are available to facilitate the process of attracting investment to the historic commercial district. The program builds public awareness for the commercial district's historic buildings and for good design.

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, planning, recognition, streets, historic, program, property, investment, commercial, and incentive

Demonstrate an established vision for downtown and a mission that defines the role of the organization that will manage the downtown initiative.

The organization has an appropriate written mission statement. The mission statement is reviewed annually and updated as appropriate. The organization has an appropriate written vision statement for downtown that is reviewed annually and updated as appropriate. The vision statement should define the economic potential of downtown.
Tagged Interests: strategic and downtown

New Main Street Director attendance at Main Street Orientation, held each month in Raleigh, within three

Tagged Interests: streets

months of start date (if not previously attended).

Main Street Director attendance at Main Street Basic Training each time there is a change in management (if not previously attended). Fund the local Main Street program through both public and private partnerships at a level allowing for full
Tagged Interests: streets, program, and training

implementation of the program based on the Four-Point Approach@ and the adopted annual work plan.

The Main Street programls budget should be adequate to achieve the program's goals. The dollar amount that is adequate for a program budget may vary. The budget should be specifically dedicated to revitalizing the commercial district. The Main Street program's budget should contain funds adequate to cover the salary and benefits of staff; office expenses; travel; professional development; and committee activities. Revenue sources are varied and broad-based, including appropriate support from the municipal
Tagged Interests: funding, streets, budget, travel, development, program, Development, and commercial

government. There is a strategy in place to help maintain stable funding.

There is a process in place for financial oversight and management. Regular monthly financial reports are made by the treasurer to the board. Main Street Director's attendance at Main Street Directors' Meeting held once a year in August. (In the case of a

Tagged Interests: funding, finance, strategic, streets, Treasurer, TREASURER, and financial report

vacancy or illness/emergency, a substitution for the director may be made for this meeting).

Main Street Director (or Volunteer if Director cannot) attendance at a minimum of one of two bi-annual regional meetings each year. (Held in May and October/November.) *It is recommended that the Director attends both meetings, not just one. Main Street Director and a minimum of one volunteer attendance at the annual NC
Tagged Interests: streets, emergency, and volunteer

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Main Street Conference - (NCMS provides each designated MS community with two complimentary registrations).

Submit annual Statistical data in July and Budget Salary information and Program Assessment Survey in January as requested to the NCMS Center.

Tagged Interests: streets, budget, and program

Maintain an annual membership with the National Main Street Center at a 375 Main Street America Community Member level.

Tagged Interests: streets

Reimbursement of NC Main Street Rural Planning Center's travel expenses, when traveling to the local community, at the IRS state rate plus meals at the state per diem rate and lodging in accordance to the NC Main

Street Rural Planning Center Travel Policy. Main Street Program must also sign and follow the attached National Main Street sublicense agreement and must comply with all Accredited or Affiliate community requirements. Logos and Website language will be sent following receipt of signed agreements. Documents Needed for a Change in Administration of the Local Main Street Program, including if the organization changes from a nonprofite government or quasi-public-private structure to a different structure:
Tagged Interests: planning, rural, streets, travel, program, policy, information technology, and Information Technology

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The City/ Town Council has the authority to designate another agency/entity to administer the Main Street

program. North Carolina Main Street Center requires: A resolution from the City/ Town Council that authorizes this change.
Tagged Interests: council, streets, and program

Minutes of the City/ Town Council Meeting clearly demonstrating the majority vote.

Documentation demonstrating how the entity that will be administering the Main Street Program will address the items listed under the requirements section of this document.
Tagged Interests: streets and program

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2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION

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Benefits of Membership with The National Main Street Center

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Designated Main Street Member

(Required for all active, designated N.C. Main Street and Small Town Main Street communities) As a Designated Main Street Member, your program is a recognized leader among the largest network of commercial district organizations in the world. Tap into the expertise of our large network of Main Street Programs, BIDS, CDCs, planners, local government agencies, consultants, and others to learn, research and share useful experience with each other. This guide explains the benefits of membership and how to access these tools. We want you to get as much out of your membership as possible Please contact us if you require any assistance with your benefits. Your benefits include:
Tagged Interests: rfp, RFP, recognition, streets, services, program, and commercial

Exclusive eligibility to be recognized as an Affiliate or Accredited Main Street America program; Exclusive eligibility to enter into a Licensing Agreement with the NMSC, or your Coordinating Program, to use Main Street AmericaTM name and logo; Eligibility to apply for the Great American Main Street Awards and other special awards and grant programs. Up to six free sub-memberships to share access to resources with your team Access to The Point, our exclusive online member networking platform; Access to Main Street News, a weekly newsletter on new trends, stories from the field, and need-to-know information for those in the commercial district revitalization field; Members-only rates at the annual Main Street Now Conference, and the Main Street America Institute; State of Main, our annual printed publication; Access to our digital library of must-read revitalization publications and resource guides, including exclusive training materials on the Main Street Approach and full archives of the Main Street Now journal; Free online training opportunities; Full access to the Main Street Resource Center with sample documents, articles, reports, and more from your peers and experts in the field all at your fingertips; Ability to post job openings for your local program through the National Trust for Historic Preservation's online Career Center.

P a ge 2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION10 Access to tailored insurance products from the National Trust Insurance Services, LLC. Family level membership with the National Trust for Historic Preservation including a subscription to Preservation magazine. And more Annual Dues: 375 Information from: https://www.mainstreet.org/ioin Signature Page

Tagged Interests: historic preservation, grant, recognition, streets, historic, materials, services, program, insurance, training, preservation, commercial, networking, rates, and library

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Designated Main Street City/ Town: (Please Print Clearly) Sylva

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Tagged Interests: streets

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Name of Local Main Street Administrating Organization: (Please Print Clearly) Main Street Sylva Association

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Tagged Interests: streets

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Check Which One Applies: Public (City/ Town) Administered Private (Non-Profit) Administered Quasi Public-Private (Town/Non-Profit) Administered

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Tagged Interests: nonprofit

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Name of Main Street Director: (Please Print Clearly) Paige Dowling

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Tagged Interests: streets

Title: Town Manager, Main St. Economic Development Director

Signature:
Tagged Interests: economic development, development, Development, and manager

Date: Mav 14, 2020

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5a. For Quasi-Public-Private Administered OR Private Non-Profit Administered Programs:

Tagged Interests: nonprofit and program

Name of Main Street Board Chair: (Please Print Clearly)

John Wermuth
Tagged Interests: streets

Signature of Board Chair:

Date: May 14, 2020

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5b. For Public OR Quasi Public-Private Administered Programs: Name of City/ Town Manager: (Please Print Clearly)

Paige Dowling, Town Manager Title: (Please Print)
Tagged Interests: program and manager

Signature of City/ Town Manager:

Tagged Interests: manager

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P a ge 2020-21 ANNUAL AGREEMENT NORTH CAROLINA MAIN STREET@ DESIGNATION

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Tagged Interests: streets